Divinity Oil

Mother Jai’s Pure Divinity Oil

This oil blend is purely divine with historically healing oils including Frankincense, Myrrh, Sandalwood, Jasmine and Ylang Ylang. This blend smells divine and is amazing for balancing hormones and alleviating depression. Use it as a full body moisturizer or natural perfume.

Frankincense: is used by either inhaling the oil or absorbing it through the skin, usually mixed with a carrier oil, such sunflower oil. It’s believed that the oil transmits messages to the limbic system of the brain, which is known to influence the nervous system. A little bit of oil goes a long way; it should not be ingested in large quantities as it can be toxic.

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The health benefits of frankincense essential oil can be attributed to its properties as an antiseptic, disinfectant, astringent, carminative, cicatrisant, cytophylactic, digestive, diuretic, emmenagogue, expectorant, sedative, tonic, uterine, and a vulnerary substance. Frankincense oil relieves pain associated with rheumatism and arthritis. It helps to heal boils, infected wounds, acne, circulatory problems, insomnia, and various types of inflammation as well.

Jasmine: also known as the “Queen of the Night” or “King of Oils” is a highly intoxicating plant. Its strong, heavy yet sweet scent has been used for years to invoke love and happiness.

The health benefits of jasmine essential oil can be attributed to its properties as an antidepressant, antiseptic, aphrodisiac, antispasmodic, cicatrisant, expectorant, galactagogue, emmenagogue, parturient, sedative, and a uterine substance.

Myrrh: Myrrh is a sap-like substance (resin) that comes out of cuts in the bark of trees that are members of the Commiphora species. It is familiar to many as one of the traditional resinous gifts mentioned in the Bible. It has been used for thousands of years in traditional healing therapies and in religious ceremonies. Its amber scent creates a warm, calming environment. The oil is often used during meditation to create a relaxing and uplifting atmosphere.

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Myrrh is commonly used for indigestion, ulcers, colds, cough, asthma, lung congestion, arthritis pain, cancer, leprosy, spasms, and syphilis. It is also used as a stimulant and to increase menstrual flow. Applied directly to the mouth for soreness and swelling, inflamed gums (gingivitis), loose teeth, canker sores, bad breath, and chapped lips. It is also used topically for hemorrhoids, bedsores, wounds, abrasions, and boils.

Sandalwood: commonly known for its woodsy, sweet smell. It is frequently used as a base for products such as incense, perfumes, cosmetics and aftershave. It also easily blends well with other oils. Sandalwood essential oil helps users to achieve more clarity and calmness due to its extensive therapeutic benefits. This special essential oil can also have an effect on overall well-being and mental health, along with many other surprising healing properties.

Sandalwood oil has a classic scent and a very interesting agglomeration of benefits. It has antiseptic, anti-inflammatory, antiphlogistic, antispasmodic, astringent, cicatrisant, carminative, diuretic, disinfectant, emollient, expectorant, and hypotensive properties. Sandalwood essential oil is a great memory booster, sedative, and tonic.

Ylang Ylang: (Cananga odorata) essential oil comes from flower petals of the large, tropical ylang ylang tree. Ylang ylang actually means “flower of flowers” and was given this name because of its sweet, floral scent. In fact, you can recognize ylang ylang’s smell as one of the key ingredients used in the legendary perfume Chanel No. 5.

Research shows that this oil has positive effects on immune health, blood flow and emotions, making it a natural remedy for the endocrine, cardiovascular, reproductive and digestive systems.

So as you see Mother Jai’s Divinity Oil is an amazing blend that smells wonderful and provides the body with a multitude of nourishing and healing compounds. Get your bottle below.

Myrtle Oil

Myrtus communis (flowers with Puccinia psidii). Location: Maui, Lower Kimo Rd Kula http://www.starrenvironmental.com/

Myrtle leaf oil (Myrtus communis)

Myrtle essential oil comes from the same family as eucalyptus, tea tree, bayberry and English bog myrtle. It is a small tree or large bush with lots of small, tough branches, small shaply pointed leaves and flowers followed by small, black berries. The leaves and flowers have a prominent fragrance.

Myrtle has been used in herbal medicine since ancient Egyptian times, as there are records showing the leaves being steeped in wine to combat fever and infection. The plant was dedicated to Aphrodite in Ancient Greece and Dioscórides prescribed macerated Myrtle wine to patients suffering from lung and bladder infections, as well as for tuberculosis. Dr Delious de Savgnac (1876) recommended Myrtle for the treatment of hemorrhoids, pulmonary infections, genital infections and problems with the bladder and urinary system.

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The therapeutic properties of myrtle essential oil are anticatarrhal, antiseptic, astringent, bactericidal, expectorant and balsamic. The main chemical components are alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, limonene, cineole, alpha-terpinen-4-ol, myrtenol, geraniol, linalyl acetate, myrtenyl acetate and carvacrol.

Blends well with: atlas, bergamot, benzoin, black pepper, cedarwood, clary sage, clove, coriander, elmi, eucalyptus, frankincense, ginger, hyssop, jasmine, lavender, lemongrass, melissa, myrrh, neroli, peppermint, rose, rosemary, rosewood, spearmint, thyme, tea tree and ylang ylang essential oils.

Precautions: It is classed as a non-toxic, non-irritant and non-sensitizing oil – excessive use of it can lead to headaches and nausea.

Uses for Myrtle oil

Myrtle essential oil is primarily used for chronic pulmonary conditions, to expel phlegm and catarrh from the lungs. It is useful for acne prone skin and also as a sleeping aid, to uplift, refresh and restore. Myrtle oil is said to be of great benefit in helping people to cope with withdrawal from addiction. It has an uplifting effect on the body and mind and is helpful when used in cases of self-destructive behavior – it is said to cleanse the inner being and dissolve disharmony.

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Myrtle, along with willow tree bark, occupies a prominent place in the writings of Hippocrates, Pliny, Dioscorides, Galen, and the Arabian writers. It has been prescribed for fever and pain by ancient physicians since at least 2,500 BC in Sumer. Myrtle’s effects are due to high levels of salicylic acid, a compound related to aspirin and the basis of the modern class of drugs known as NSAIDs.

CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2256192

Nutritional Value of Myrtle

Myrtle leaves and fruit contains a unique combination of organic compounds and nutrients that make it not only an interesting dietary addition as an herb but also as an invaluable source of essential oil. Myrtle contains various antioxidants and flavonoid compounds, including myricetin, as well as quercetin, catechin, citric and malic acids, linalool, pinene, tannins, and other sugars.

Benefits of Using Myrtle Essential Oil

Aphrodisiac: associated with Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love. It works very well to alleviate problems like impotency, frigidity, erectile dysfunctions, and loss of libido.

Anticancer Potential: highly praised for its high levels of antioxidants, including quercetin, tannins, myricetin, and catechin. These antioxidants have been widely studied and have been found to have anti-carcinogenic and anti-mutagenic properties. According to a research report in Natural Product Communications Journal, myrtle is quite similar in chemical composition to sandalwood, which has been connected to a reduction in prostate and breast cancer.

Astringent Properties: If used in mouthwash, myrtle essential oil makes the gums contract and strengthen their hold on the teeth. If ingested, it also makes the intestinal tracts and muscles contract. Furthermore, it contracts and tightens the skin and helps to diminish wrinkles. It can also help stop hemorrhaging by inducing the blood vessels to contract.

Eases Breathing: counters the accumulation of phlegm and catarrh in the respiratory tracts. This property also curbs the formation of mucus and provides relief from coughs and breathing trouble.

Eliminates Bad Odor: It can be used in incense sticks and burners, fumigants, and vaporizers as room fresheners. It can also be used as a body deodorant or perfume. It has no side effects like itching, irritation or patches on the skin like certain commercial deodorants.

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Expectorant: reduces the presence and further deposition of phlegm. It also clears congestion of the nasal tracts, bronchi, and lungs resulting from colds and provides good relief from coughing.

Fights Infections: inhibits infections since it is a bactericidal, germicidal, fungicidal, and antiviral substance. It also helps to reduce infections in the stomach and intestines, while helping to stop diarrhea.

Hormone Balance: Extensive research has been conducted around the world regarding the effects of myrtle essential oil on the endocrine system, primarily in regulation of the thyroid gland. It has been shown that myrtle essential oil, whether consumed or inhaled, can positively affect the release of hormones, including those related to the ovaries and women’s reproductive health.

Maintains Healthy Nerves: It maintains the stability of the nerves and keeps you from becoming nervous or unnecessarily stressed over small issues. It is a beneficial agent against nervous and neurotic disorders, shaking limbs, fear, vertigo, anxiety, and stress.

Prevents Infections: This property makes myrtle essential oil a suitable substance to apply on wounds. It does not let microbes infect the wounds and thereby protects against sepsis and tetanus, in case of an iron object being the cause of the damage.

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Relaxes the Body: The essential oil of myrtle relaxes and sedates. This property also provides relief from tension, stress, annoyance, anger, distress, and depression, as well as from inflammation, irritation, and various allergies.

Myrtle can be used for skin care and against hemorrhoids, acne, pimples, cystitis, infections in the urinary tract, and chronic problems like leucorrhea. And, it is effective against chest infections in both babies and the elderly.

Words of Caution: There is no inherent risk in using myrtle essential oil, but as always, pay attention to your body’s reaction to any new substance or supplement, and consult a doctor if anything unusual occurs.

References:

https://www.aromaweb.com/essential-oils/myrtle-oil.asp

https://www.rockymountainoils.com/myrtle.html/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24706627

https://essentialoils.co.za/essential-oils/myrtle.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myrtus

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/6fcd/0559ad9e36b544d09f503040df4d63e151c5.pdf

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/b0db/33d673dd4f71b8075dc1dafd5ca30765c2ec.pdf

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10496475.2011.556986

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0944501313001766

https://www.mdpi.com/1420-3049/23/10/2502

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/283500310_Identify_the_essential_oils_in_Myrtus_communis_L_leaves

https://www.organicfacts.net/myrtle-essential-oil.html

Coconut Soap

Mother Jai’s Coconut Oil Soap

Home made and hand blended soap made of only Organic Coconut Oil, Distilled Water, and Sodium Hydroxide (yes, Lye). Mother Jai uses only silicon molds for this soap to prevent metal and releasing agent contamination. Silicon is inert and does not release any chemicals into products.

This is a ‘superfat’ blend. That means when the soap is made Mother Jai includes extra Coconut Oil to ensure all of the Lye reacts and to make the soap super moisturizing. This soap produces a wonderful fluffy foam that nourishes the skin and hair. Rub soap bar onto a loofa or wash cloth and scrub face and body.

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As a shampoo bar it leaves hair clean and soft without over drying. It also works great to preserve hair dye as it is not a ‘detergent’ like many commercial shampoos. Hair with bright colored hair dye do extremely well with this coconut oil soap. Simply rub the bar on wet hair until foam forms then massage through hair with fingertips. Don’t forget to massage your scalp to improve hair growth by stimulating follicles.

As a hand soap it leaves hands soft and sanitized without ‘antibacterial’ chemicals. You can use the bar whole or dissolve it for sanitary purposes. Simply break up the soap bar into smaller pieces and dissolve in distilled water. One 4oz bar to 20oz of Water in a jar. Allow it to dissolve completely and pour into soap pump. It is more ‘liquidy’ than commercial soaps because it lacks artificial fillers and stabilizers. This liquid soap works great on surfaces, dishes and clothes as well.

Organic Coconut Oil

Coconut oil soap is an excellent moisturizer for both the skin and the hair. The properties of the coconut oil also help remove dead skin cells and dirt away from the body. The oils also help prevent or reduce acne. It also helps firm up your skin helps you look younger as the soap is rich in antioxidants.

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Lauric, Capric, and Caprylic Acid – These fatty acids from the coconut are antimicrobial agents.  They help fight against nasty things like viruses, bacteria, fungi, and yeast.  Who needs anti-bacterial soap when you can just use coconut oil!

Micronutrients – Including calcium, potassium, magnesium, manganese, copper, zinc, iron, selenium, and vitamins C and E.  These micronutrients can pack a world of benefits from lowering blood pressure (manganese) to dandruff alleviation and prevention of skin aging (selenium).  

Antioxidants – Many of these micronutrients also act as anti-oxidants meaning that they block potentially harmful free radicals which can prevent disease and improve skin condition.

Distilled Water

Water that has been boiled into vapor and condensed back into liquid in a separate container. Impurities in the original water that do not boil below or near the boiling point of water remain in the original container. Thus, distilled water is one type of purified water. This means that distilled water is only H2O and all of the minerals, chemicals, bacteria and molds have been removed. This leaves a clean base for making clean soap.

Sodium Hydroxide (NaOH)

Is an inorganic compound with the formula NaOH. It is a white solid ionic compound consisting of sodium cations Na+ and hydroxide anions OH. Sodium hydroxide is a highly caustic base and alkali that decomposes proteins at ordinary ambient temperatures and may cause severe chemical burns. It is highly soluble in water, and readily absorbs moisture and carbon dioxide from the air.

This chemical is used to manufacture soaps, rayon, paper, explosives, dyestuffs, and petroleum products. It is also used in processing cotton fabric, laundering and bleaching, metal cleaning and processing, oxide coating, electroplating, and electrolytic extracting. It is commonly found in commercial drain/ oven cleaners. According to the the FDA, sodium hydroxide is considered a direct food recognized as safe, where it serves as a pH control agent and follows good manufacturing guidelines. Interestingly, sodium hydroxide has been studied for its use in the treatment of prion disease (as occurs in mad cow disease and kuru). The use of this compound has been shown to effectively reduce prion levels in an in vitro inactivation assay.

Sodium hydroxide is used in several food processing applications, such as curing foods like olives or helping to brown Bavarian-style pretzels, giving them their characteristic crunch. Sodium hydroxide is used to remove skins from tomatoes, potatoes and other fruits and vegetables for canning and also as an ingredient in food preservatives that help prevent mold and bacteria from growing in food.

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Get your home made superfat lye soap here.

Lye Soap

Soap is the result of a chemical reaction called saponification that occurs between lye and a type of molecule called a triglyceride (a fat or oil), where both substances are chemically transformed, creating soap and natural glycerin. Neither of the original ingredients exists anymore. All the lye – either sodium hydroxide for bar soap or potassium hydroxide for liquid soap – is consumed in the reaction.

So, while soap is made with lye, it doesn’t contain lye. Modern methods and measuring scales – as opposed to what was available to frontier women – allow soap-makers to use the proper mixture of oils and lye, ensuring that all lye is consumed. In addition, many soap-makers, including Mother Jai’s, add more oil than is required for the chemical reaction, further ensuring the neutralization of lye and adding to the soap’s moisturizing qualities. Including extra fats in the mixture is known as superfatting.

Still, some soap-makers make a point of positioning themselves as lye “alternatives,” insisting – for example – they use glycerin instead, or make their soap without the involvement of lye. In both these cases, misinformation seems to be a factor. Glycerin is a natural result of saponification. And the first step in creating bases for melt-and-pour soap-making – the most convenient home-based process? Saponification.

Understanding chemistry can go a long way toward informing public perceptions, including those of your customers. As negative as some perceptions of lye can be, all soap is made with lye – whether it’s bar or liquid – and soap made well can be great for your skin. The distinction between soap and commercial cleansers is especially clear with liquid soaps. Since most weren’t made with lye, what you’re buying isn’t soap, but a factory-made detergent for the skin. These are chemical emulsifiers usually derived from petroleum.

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The truth about lye in soap-making is simple: there is no true soap, as defined by the FDA, without lye. There’s also a huge difference between “made with lye” and “containing lye.”

Lye isn’t a villain, nor is soap made with lye something to avoid. In fact, in the hands of good soap-makers, it’s a product made with your skin and health in mind, and is far superior in overall quality and gentleness to commercial, non-soap cleansers. Lye is what you should be using.

Get your home made superfat lye soap here.

By Walkerma – Own work, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=5190866

Benefits Using of Lye Soap

Despite popular belief, lye soap is not harsh and it doesn’t burn skin. When farmers and homesteaders in the past made soap, they did not use correct proportions of lye and fats. They produced soap with residual lye in it. That soap burned skin. Unfortunately, the oldies ruined reputation of lye soap for us. Fortunately, modern homesteaders and soap makers have great resources available to them to make lye soap that is cleansing, soothing, conditioning, and pampering.

General Skin Care : Daily pampering with lye soap cleanses and conditions skin, gets rid of dry and itchy skin, rashes and irritations.

Acne Cure: Lye soap unclogs pores, reduces inflammation, and balances skin pH. Washing face with lye soap daily reduces acne and blackheads. It leaves skin silky and radiant.

Balancing Dry or Oily Skin: Lye soap fends both dry skin and oily skin. The way it works is very simple and ingenious.

  • Dry skin: Glycerin in the soap moisturizes dry skin. There is very little need or no need at all to use lotions any more.
  • Oily skin: This is the type of skin that has overactive oil (sebaceous) glands. When harsh soaps are used on oily skin, they make skin overly dry, but just for a short period of time. Oily skin reacts to dryness by producing extra lubricants by the oil glands. Such skin becomes oily almost immediately after washing.

Using lye soap on oily skin leaves the skin mildly moisturized by glycerin. Under these conditions, the oily skin doesn’t have to work overtime to produce oils any more. You must be patient though. This doesn’t happen overnight. You have to “train” your oily skin to slow down oil production by the hyperactive glands. It may take weeks to achieve noticeable results.

Seborrheic Dermatitis & Dandruff Treatment: Lye soap is used in the treatment of seborrhea and dandruff. Simply washing your hair and affected areas with lye soap reduces the flaky skin and irritation. Some lye soaps prescribed by dermatologists are medicated with aspirin, coal tar, zinc, or other additives.

Eczema, Psoriasis Relief: Because of the emollient qualities of lye soap, it is used by people with eczema and psoriasis to relief itching, irritation, and minimize the symptoms.

Sun Burn Treatment and Prevention: Using lye soap on the bare skin before going out in the sun minimizes sunburns. Lye soap helps cure inflamed skin if the sunburns already happened. Lather lye soap on the sunburned area and leave it overnight. Repeat until sunburn is gone. Lye soap speeds up the healing process.

Poison Ivy, Poison Oak, Poison Sumac Treatment: Washing the affected skin area with lye soap immediately after contact with the poisonous plants may help avoid the reaction altogether. If some time is passed after the contact, the reaction is very likely to happen. To minimize the reaction, wash the area with lye soap as soon as possible, and rinse with water. Repeat washing a few times. Lather lye soap on the affected skin and leave it on until the next wash. Skin reaction will disappear soon.

Insect Bites Cure and Insect Repellent: Washing the bites with lye soap reliefs itching and swelling almost immediately. Lather lye soap on your bare skin to repel mosquitoes. A bar of lye soap in your kitchen cabinets will keep ants in check.

Lye Soap Slows Down Skin Aging: Soothing, moisturizing, and antioxidant qualities of lye soap slows down formation of wrinkles and age spots when used daily.

Hunters’ Trick (can be a health benefit at times): Wash with unscented lye soap to become “invisible” when you go hunting. Lye soap removes human scent and animals become unaware of you presence. Happy hunting!

Get your home made superfat lye soap here.

Dandelion

Franz Eugen Köhler, Köhler’s Medizinal-Pflanzen

Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)

Botanical Name: Taraxacum officinale, Taraxacum mongolicum, Taraxacum palustre, Taraxacum vulgar.

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Mother Jai’s Detox Tea features organic dandelion root and leaf.

Other Common Names: Blowball, canker wort, clock flower, dente de lion, dudhal, dumble-dor, fairy clock, huang hua di ding (yellow flower earth nail), Irish daisy, lion’s tooth, lowenzahnwurzel, mælkebotte, milk gowan, min-deul-rre, monk’s head, mongoloid dandelion, priest’s crown, puffball, swine snout, tell-time, white endive, wild endive, witches’ milk.

Habitat: Dandelion can be found in the temperate regions of Europe, Asia, and North America. Hundreds of species of this hardy and beneficial herb are found throughout the Northern Hemisphere. Some botanists believe that the plant is circumpolar; that is, native to all the temperate regions of the northern hemisphere. Other botanists classify the dandelion as a species introduced to North America from Eurasia. It is found growing wild in meadows, pastures, waste grounds, sand, gravel, rocks, and even cracks in concrete. Most commercial dandelion is cultivated in Bulgaria, Hungary, Poland, Romania and the United Kingdom.

Plant Description: Dandelion is a hardy, variable perennial that is closely related to chicory (Cichorium intybus) that can reach a height of nearly 12 inches. The roots are fleshy and brittle roots are filled with a white milky substance that is bitter and slightly odorous. The dark brown roots may reach into the soil for a foot or more. The shiny, hairless leaves are irregularly dentate or pinnate, either oblong or spatulate. The leaves grow in a rosette from the milky taproot. The grooved leaves funnel rainfall down to the roots. The yellow flowers grow singly on a straight stem that is leafless, hollow, smooth and pale green; it may be tinged with mauve. The flowers are light-sensitive, opening in the morning and closing in the evening or in the event of cloudy weather. The familiar puff-ball that succeeds the flower is a globular cluster of achenes, each of which is fitted with a parachute-like tuft that easily floats on the breeze in order to distribute the seeds. Dandelion flowers open with the sun in the morning and close in the evening or during gloomy weather. The dark brown roots are fleshy and brittle and are filled with a white milky substance that is bitter and slightly smelly.

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Plant Parts Used: Leaves, flowers, and root. Dandelion leaves act as a diuretic, increasing the amount of urine your body makes. The leaves are used to stimulate the appetite and help digestion. Dandelion flower has antioxidant properties. Dandelion may also help improve the immune system. Herbalists use dandelion root to detoxify the liver and gallbladder, and dandelion leaves to help kidney function.

Available Forms: You can find dandelion herbs and roots fresh or dried in a variety of forms, including tinctures, liquid extract, teas, tablets, and capsules. Dandelion can be found alone or combined with other dietary supplements.

History: In the past, dandelion roots and leaves were used to treat liver problems. Native Americans also boiled dandelion in water and took it to treat kidney disease, swelling, skin problems, heartburn, and upset stomach. In traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), dandelion has been used to treat stomach problems, appendicitis, and breast problems, such as inflammation or lack of milk flow. In Europe, dandelion was used in remedies for fever, boils, eye problems, diabetes, and diarrhea.

Dandelion flowers have been used to make dandelion wine, for which there are many recipes. Most of these are more accurately described as “dandelion-flavored wine,” as some other sort of fermented juice or extract serves as the main ingredient. It has also been used in a saison ale called Pissenlit (the French word for dandelion, literally meaning “wet the bed”) made by Brasserie Fantôme in Belgium. Dandelion and burdock is a soft drink that has long been popular in the United Kingdom.

Another recipe using the plant is dandelion flower jam. In Silesia and other parts of Poland and the world, dandelion flowers are used to make a honey substitute syrup with added lemon (so-called May-honey). Ground roasted dandelion root can be used as a non-caffeinated coffee substitute.

Properties

Dandelion is on the FDA’s list of safe foods and is approved by the Council of Europe.

The chief constituents of Dandelion root are Taraxacin, acrystalline and Taraxacerin, an acrid resin, with Inulin (a sort of sugar which replaces starch in many of the Dandelion family, Compositae), gluten, gum and potash. It contains substantial levels of vitamins A, C, D, B-complex, iron, magnesium, zinc, potassium, manganese, choline, calcium and boron.

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Diuretic, tonic and slightly aperient. It is a general stimulant to the system, but especially to the urinary organs, and is chiefly used in kidney and liver disorders.

Dandelion is not only official but is used in many patent medicines. Not being poisonous, quite big doses of its preparations may be taken. Its beneficial action is best obtained when combined with other agents.

Note there are some dandelion look-alikes such as cat’s ear (Hypochoeris radicata), hawkweed (Hieracium pilosella), young wild lettuce (Lactuca spp.) plants, and sow thistle (Sonchus spp.) (Tilford, 1997; Virginia Tech, n.d., Edible Wild Food, n.d.). Note that dandelion differs from these plants in that it only has one flower per stem (no branching stems), has a hollow stem containing milky latex, and is not hairy. Cat’s ear and hawkweed, for example are both hairy and have multiple flowers per stem on branched, solid stems.

Medicinal Uses and Indications

Most scientific studies of dandelion have been in animals, not people. Traditionally, dandelion has been used as a diuretic, to increase the amount of urine and eliminate fluid in your body. It has been used for many conditions where a diuretic might help, such as liver problems and high blood pressure. However, there is no good research on using dandelion as a diuretic in people.

Preventing urinary tract infections (UTIs). A specific combination of dandelion root and leaf extracts of another herb called uva ursi taken by mouth seems to help reduce the number of UTIs in women. In this combination, uva ursi is used because it seems to kill bacteria, and dandelion is used to increase urine flow. However, this combination should not be used long-term because it is not known if uva ursi is safe for extended use.

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Inflammation of the tonsils (Tonsillitis). An early study found that people who had their tonsils removed recovered faster if they ate soup containing dandelion compared to those who ate soup without dandelion.

Fresh or dried dandelion herb is also used as a mild appetite stimulant, and to improve upset stomach. The root of the dandelion plant may act as a mild laxative and has been used to improve digestion. Preliminary research suggests that dandelion may help improve liver and gallbladder function. But this study was not well designed.

Preliminary animal studies suggest that dandelion may help normalize blood sugar levels and lower total cholesterol and triglycerides while raising HDL (good) cholesterol in diabetic mice. But not all the animal studies have found a positive effect on blood sugar. Researchers need to see if dandelion will work in people.

Scientists at the Baylor College of Medicine have discovered the cancer chemopreventive potential of dandelion root against breast cancer. Conventional anti-cancer drugs target only the bulk of the tumor cell population, but not the rarer cancer stem cells, which are capable of indefinite self-renewal and proliferation, says Michael Lewis, Ph.D., an assistant professor of molecular and cellular biology at the Baylor College of Medicine. The results of this experiment, published in the “Journal of the National Cancer Institute,” showed that dandelion root kills both breast cancer stem cells and the bulk of the tumor.

A study by S.J. Chatterjee and colleagues published in the journal “Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine” on December 30, 2010, reported that dandelion root can be a major strategy to prevent chemical-mediated breast cancer because it can detoxify carcinogens, thus protecting tissues against carcinogenesis. In MCF-7 breast cancer cells, dandelion root extract also showed the capacity to induce apoptosis, or programmed cell death, study findings have suggested.

A few animal studies also suggest that dandelion might help fight inflammation.

Surprising Benefits Of Dandelion

Improves Bone Health: Dandelion is rich in calcium, which is essential for the growth and strength of bones and is also rich in antioxidants like vitamin C and luteolin, which protect bones from age-related damage. This inevitable impairment is often due to free radicals and is frequently seen as bone frailty, weakness, and decreased density.

Treats Liver Disorders: Dandelion can help the liver in many ways. While the antioxidants like vitamin C and luteolin keep the liver functioning in optimal gear and protect it from aging, other compounds in dandelion help to treat hemorrhaging in the liver. Furthermore, dandelion aids in maintaining the proper flow of bile, while also stimulating the liver and promoting digestion. Proper digestion can reduce the chances of constipation, which in turn reduces the risk of serious gastrointestinal issues.

Controls Diabetes: Dandelion juice can help diabetic patients by stimulating the production of insulin from the pancreas, thereby keeping the blood sugar level low. Since dandelions are diuretic in nature, they increase urination in diabetic patients, which helps to remove the excess sugar from the body. Diabetics are also prone to renal problems, so the diuretic properties of dandelion can help in removing the sugar deposition in the kidneys through increased urination. Furthermore, the dandelion juice is slightly bitter to taste, which effectively lowers the sugar level in the blood, as all bitter substances do. Consistently lower blood sugar and a regulated insulin release prevents dangerous spikes and plunges in diabetics, so dandelion extracts can be a perfect solution!

Treats Urinary Disorders: Dandelions are highly diuretic in nature, so they help eliminate deposits of toxic substances in the kidneys and the urinary tract. The disinfectant properties of dandelions also inhibit microbial growth in the urinary system. In fact, the diuretic properties of dandelions are so strong that in France, the flower is also called “pissenlit” which means “urinate in bed”.

Skin Care: Dandelion sap, also known as dandelion milk, is useful in treating skin diseases which are caused by microbial and fungal infections. This treatment stems from the fact that the sap is highly alkaline and has germicidal, insecticidal and fungicidal properties. You should be careful while using this sap and avoid any contact with the eyes. This sap can be used on itches, ringworm, eczema, and other skin conditions without the risk of side effects or hormonal disturbances commonly caused by pharmaceutical skin treatments.

Prevents Acne: Dandelion juice is a good detoxifier, diuretic, stimulant, and antioxidant. These four properties make it a great treatment for acne. Before we know how it treats acne, we must know what causes it. Acne typically arises during the teenage years, when the body undergoes many physiological and hormonal changes. The flood of new hormones that bring about the changes in the body must be regulated, but if they don’t remain at a healthy ratio, they tend to deposit somewhat toxic substances into the body. These toxins tend to come out along with sweat through the sweat glands or sebaceous glands on the skin.

During these hormonal changes, these glands secrete more oils which, when mixed with dead skin, block the pores and the secretion of toxins is obstructed. Therefore, the toxic substances cannot escape and eventually result in acne. This situation is exacerbated by the microbial infections on the affected places. Dandelion juice, being a stimulant, diuretic, and detoxifier in nature, can help to regulate proper secretion of hormones, increase sweating, and widen the pores. All of these factors help to facilitate the removal of toxins through sweat and urine. Furthermore, dandelion sap, if externally applied to areas with acne, can inhibit microbial infection and reduce the signs of acne. Also, it can speed up healing due to its vitamin C content, so the scars and ugly red inflammation that traditionally follows acne treatment will be less noticeable.

Weight Loss: Our urine consists of up to 4% fat, so the more we urinate, the more water and fats are lost from the body. Dandelions, being diuretic in nature, promote urination and thereby help in losing the dreaded “water weight” without causing any side effects. Furthermore, dandelions are low in calories, like most leafy greens, but for the small expense of calories (~1oo cal. /4 cups), you get a huge amount of beneficial side effects. This is also why dandelions are sometimes used as sweeteners because they are not packed with unhealthy sugars.

Prevents Cancer: Dandelions are high in antioxidants, such as vitamin C and luteolin, which reduce the free radicals (major cancer-causing agents) in the body, thereby reducing the risk of cancer. Vitamin C also detoxifies the body, which further helps to protect from the development of tumors and various cancers. Luteolin poisons essential components of cancer cells when it binds to them, rendering them ineffective and unable to reproduce. This characteristic has been demonstrated most notably with prostate cancer, although there are other studies being done.

Treats Jaundice: Jaundice is primarily a disorder of the liver in which the organ starts overproducing bile, which ultimately enters the bloodstream and wreaks havoc on the body’s metabolism. The excess bile is also reflected through the color of the skin and eyes, which typically develops a yellow tint. The treatment of jaundice includes three main steps. First, you need to curb the production of bile. Second, you must remove the excess bile from the body, and third, you have to fight the underlying viral infection.

Dandelions are very helpful in all of these steps. They promote liver health and regulate bile production. Being diuretic in nature, they promote urination, where the excess bile can be eliminated. Finally, as an antioxidant and disinfectant due to the presence of vitamin C and luteolin, dandelions fight viral infections as well. They are most beneficial when taken with sugarcane juice since they replace the sugar in the body, which is significantly lowered due to the impact of excess bile. A lack of sugar can cause extreme fatigue and weakness, so dandelions help to boost your energy levels after infection.

Prevents Gall Bladder Disorders: Dandelions are very beneficial for the gallbladder and liver, because they improve their general functioning, protect them from ill effects of oxidants and infections, and regulate the various secretions from both organs.

Cures Constipation: Certain components of dandelion, namely the high levels of dietary fiber make it a beneficial aid for digestion and proper intestinal health. Dietary fiber stimulates healthy bowel movements by adding bulk to stool and also reduces chances of constipation as well as diarrhea. It regulates bowel movements, which can prevent serious gastrointestinal issues. It is commonly prescribed for children who are experiencing constipation, as it is relatively soothing on the stomach. It has also been used to stimulate the appetite, particularly following trauma or surgery.

Prevents Anemia: Dandelions have relatively good levels of iron, vitamins, and protein content. While iron is an integral part of hemoglobin in the blood, vitamin B and protein are essential for the formation of red blood cells and certain other components of the blood. This way dandelion can help anemic people keep their condition in check.

Regulates Blood Pressure: Urination is an effective way of lowering blood pressure. In fact, most of the modern medicines for lowering blood pressure are based on this phenomenon. Dandelion juice, being diuretic in nature, increases urination, both in quantity and frequency. Therefore, it helps to lower high blood pressure. The fiber in dandelion is also helpful in reducing cholesterol and thereby assists in lowering blood pressure since cholesterol is one of the factors that increase blood pressure. Finally, there is a high potassium content in dandelions, which is very effective in lowering blood pressure by replacing sodium.

Other Benefits: Dandelions can also be used as a vegetable and are a good source of fiber. It promotes digestion, and in the past, it was used to treat scurvy because of its high levels of vitamin C. It also has healing effects on dyspepsia, infections in the stomach, intestines and urinary system.

How to Take it

Pediatric: Ask your doctor before giving dandelion supplements to a child so the doctor can determine the dose.

Adult: Ask your doctor to help determine the right dose for you.

Preparations

Dandelion Tea— Infuse 1 OZ. of Dandelion in a pint of boiling water for 10 minutes; decant, sweeten with honey, and drink several glasses in the course of the day. The use of this tea is efficacious in bilious affections, and is also much approved of in the treatment of dropsy.

  • Or take 2 OZ. of freshly-sliced Dandelion root, and boil in 2 pints of water until it comes to 1 pint; then add 1 OZ. of compound tincture of Horseradish. Dose, from 2 to 4 OZ. Use in a sluggish state of the liver.
  • Or 1 OZ. Dandelion root, 1 OZ. Black Horehound herb, 1/2 OZ. Sweet Flag root, 1/4 OZ. Mountain Flax. Simmer the whole in 3 pints of water down to 1 1/2 pint, strain and take a wineglassful after meals for biliousness and dizziness.

For Gall Stones— 1 OZ. Dandelion root, 1 OZ. Parsley root, 1 OZ. Balm herb, 1/2 OZ. Ginger root, 1/2 OZ. Liquorice root. Place in 2 quarts of water and gently simmer down to 1 quart, strain and take a wineglassful every two hours.

For a young child suffering from jaundice: 1 OZ. Dandelion root, 1/2 oz. Ginger root, 1/2 oz. Caraway seed, 1/2 oz. Cinnamon bark, 1/4 oz. Senna leaves. Gently boil in 3 pints of water down to 1 1/2 pint, strain, dissolve 1/2 lb. sugar in hot liquid, bring to a boil again, skim all impurities that come to the surface when clear, put on one side to cool, and give frequently in teaspoonful doses.

A Liver and Kidney Mixture— 1 OZ. Broom tops, 1/2 oz. Juniper berries, 1/2 oz. Dandelion root, 1 1/2 pint water. Boil in gredients for 10 minutes, then strain and adda small quantity of cayenne. Dose, 1 tablespoonful, three times a day.

A Medicine for Piles— 1 OZ. Long-leaved Plantain, 1 OZ. Dandelion root, 1/2 oz. Polypody root, 1 OZ. Shepherd’s Purse. Add 3 pints of water, boil down to half the quantity, strain, and add 1 OZ. of tincture of Rhubarb. Dose, a wineglassful three times a day. Celandine ointment to be applied at same time.

Word of Caution: Dandelions can be helpful in lowering blood sugar, but for patients already taking blood-sugar modulators, this can result in hypoglycemia, an equally dangerous condition. Consult your doctor before adding dandelion supplements on top of your normal treatment. Also, the milk sap of dandelions has been known to cause itchiness, irritation, or allergic reactions on the skin, and should be kept away from the eyes. Finally, there is a rare type of fiber in dandelions called inulin and some people have a predisposed sensitivity or allergy to it which can be quite severe. While adding dandelion greens to your diet in any way, start small and closely monitor your body’s response.

Precautions: The use of herbs is a time-honored approach to strengthening the body and treating disease. However, herbs can trigger side effects and interact with other herbs, supplements, or medications. For these reasons, you should take herbs under the supervision of a health care provider.

Dandelion is generally considered safe. Some people may have an allergic reaction from touching dandelion. Others may get mouth sores.

If you are allergic to ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigold, chamomile, yarrow, daisies, or iodine, you should avoid dandelion.

In some people, dandelion can cause increased stomach acid and heartburn. It may also irritate the skin.

People with kidney problems, gallbladder problems, or gallstones should consult their doctors before eating dandelion.

Possible Interactions

Dandelion leaf may act as a diuretic, which can make drugs leave your body faster. It also interacts with a number of medications that are broken down by the liver. If you are taking prescription medications, ask your doctor before taking dandelion leaf. Medications that may interact with dandelion include:

Antacids: Dandelion may increase the amount of stomach acid, so antacids may not work as well.

Blood-thinning medications (anticoagulants and antiplatelets): It is possible that dandelion may increase the risk of bleeding, especially if you already take blood thinners such as aspirin, warfarin (Coumadin), or clopidogrel (Plavix).

Diuretics (water pills): Dandelion may act as a diuretic, causing your body to produce more urine to get rid of excess fluid. If you also take prescription diuretics, or other herbs that act as diuretics, you could be at risk of electrolyte imbalances.

Lithium: Lithium is used to treat bipolar disorder. Animal studies suggest that dandelion may worsen the side effects of lithium.

Ciproflaxin (Cipro): One species of dandelion, Taraxacum mongolicum, also called Chinese dandelion, may lower the amount of the antibiotic ciproflaxin that your body absorbs. Researchers do not know whether the common dandelion would do the same thing.

Medications for diabetes: Theoretically, dandelion may lower blood sugar levels. If you take medications for diabetes, taking dandelion may increase the risk of low blood sugar.

Medications broken down by the liver: Dandelion can interact with a number of medications. To be safe, ask your doctor before taking dandelion if you take any medication.

Recipes

Dandelion Pesto – Adapted from The Wild Wisdom of Weeds by Katrina Blair

Ingredients

  • 2 cups fresh young dandelion greens
  • 1 cup basil
  • 1 cup cashews, almonds, or pine nuts
  • ½ cup olive oil
  • 1 cup water
  • 3 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 1 teaspoon salt

Directions

  • Wash and dry dandelion greens and basil.
  • Combine all ingredients in a blender or food processor and blend until smooth and creamy.
  • Serve as a dip with vegetable crudites or crackers, on pasta, or as a sandwich spread.

The Health Benefits Of Dandelion For Dogs

If your dog suffers from digestive issues, dandelion may be a great herb to consider. The dandelion flower may be used for its antioxidant properties and may improve the immune system. It is also high in lecithin. Dandelion leaves are loaded with potassium. They also stimulate the appetite and help digestion along with kidney function. They are an ideal choice for dogs with chronic indigestion or those with gas. Dandelion leaf also acts as a diuretic, making it useful in cases of arthritis, kidney stones, congestive heart failure and gallbladder disease. And best of all, dandelion leaf contains lots of potassium, which can be lost through urination. Dandelion leaf also stimulates the liver and promotes the elimination of waste material from the body. Dandelion root is also quite useful and nutritional. The root is a liver tonic and helps to remove toxins from the body, via the kidneys. Signs of toxicity can include:

  • Skin disease
  • Dandruff
  • Chronic constipation
  • Dandelion root can also treat gallstones and gallbladder inflammation.

Using Dandelion: Dandelion can be used as a dried herb, a tea or as a tincture.

Dandelion Tea – To make dandelion tea:

  • Use 5g to 30g dried herb infused in 8oz water.
  • You can use 1/3 of a cup per 20 pounds of your dogs body weight, up to 3 times a day.
  • For dried herbs, use a teaspoon per 20 pounds.

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