Tap Water VS Bottled Water

Why Tap Water is Better Than Bottled Water

Yes, our tap water can be unsafe. Yes, there are multiple industrial and agricultural based chemicals found in our tap water. Our municipal water supplies are tested daily and regulated by federal law, yet the standards they have developed are not actually safe levels for human consumption. These levels are typically determined through political compromise and not actual scientific study.

Yet bottled water is worse!

Why? Because it takes all of the chemicals in tap water and adds chemicals from the plastic bottle it’s stored in, for who knows how long.

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We know which is better for the environment. That’s easy. Not only are millions of tons of plastic bottles clogging our landfills, but it takes 1.63 liters of water to make every liter of Dasani—and the company is doing it in drought-plagued California.

Even though both the federal government and most states have bottled-water safety programs, regulations don’t adequately assure consumers of either purity or safety. A few state bottled-water programs (for example, those in Massachusetts and New York) maintain lists of the sources, but not all do.

It’s regulated by different agencies, with different missions. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency oversees the quality of water that comes out of your tap, while the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is responsible for ensuring the safety and truthful labeling of bottled water sold nationally. States are responsible for regulating water that is both packaged and sold within its borders (which is most of the bottled-water market), but one in five states doesn’t even bother.

It’s important to note that the federal government does not require bottled water to be safer than tap. In fact, just the opposite is true in many cases. Tap water in most big cities must be disinfected, filtered to remove pathogens, and tested for cryptosporidium and giardia viruses. Bottled water does not have to be.

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Carefully check the label and even the cap; if it says “from a municipal source” or “from a community water system,” this means it’s derived from tap. If you don’t find any information on the bottle, you can call the bottler or the bottled-water program in your state or the state where it was packaged and ask about the source.

Recent research suggests there might be cause for concern. Chemicals called phthalates, which are known to disrupt testosterone and other hormones, can leach into bottled water over time. One study found that water that had been stored for 10 weeks in plastic and in glass bottles containing phthalates, suggesting that the chemicals could be coming from the plastic cap or liner. Although there are regulatory standards limiting phthalates in tap, there are no legal limits in bottled water; the bottled-water industry waged a successful campaign opposing the FDA proposal to set a legal limit for these chemicals.

In a recent study by German researchers, nearly 25,000 chemicals were found lurking in a single bottle of water. Many of these chemicals mimic the effects of potent pharmaceuticals inside your body, according to the study published in the journal PLoS One.

Using other forms of detection to isolate the various chemicals, the researchers found more than 24,500 different chemicals in the bottled waters – including two classes of chemicals, maleates and fumarates, which are known potent endocrine disruptors (hormonally active chemicals). Maleates and fumarates are utilized to manufacture plastic resins, which are used to make water bottles, and they may also appear as contaminants of other plastic chemicals.

In widespread testing, a whopping 93 percent of bottled water samples tested were contaminated with tiny pieces of plastic. The study found an average of 10 total plastic particles and plastic fibers per liter; that’s twice the plastic level found in tap water. And get this: Some of the most popular brands were contaminated — this is widespread. A small amount of the plastic fragments tested positive for industrial lubricants, but researchers say there’s evidence that at least some of the tiny plastic pieces found in the water come from the packaging itself … perhaps the caps because polypropylene plastic bits turned up in more than half the bottled water samples tested.

As a healthy adult, the occasional sip from the “toxic fountain” of bottled water won’t kill you. However, small children, women of child-bearing age, and pregnant women are at greater risk of poor outcomes when exposed to these chemicals. Effects can include stunted growth, early puberty, premature birth, infertility and early menopause – just to name a few. The remaining population should still exercise caution, as more and more research is discovering that these chemicals can also trigger diabetes, heart disease and certain types of cancer.

What are FDA standards? (www.banthebottle.net)

Under the standard of quality (21 CFR, 165.110[b]), FDA allows certain levels of contaminants in bottled water.

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Contaminants bottled water may have in it.

Coliform. Coliform are rod-shaped bacteria, such as E. coli, that are normally present in the human intestine. The FDA says that bottled water may have up to 9.2 coliform organisms per 100 milliliters. See 21 CFR 165.110[b].

Arsenic. Arsenic is a poison. The FDA says that bottled water may have up to 0.05 milligrams per liter of arsenic. See 21 CFR 165.110[b].

Chloride. Chloride is a compound of chlorine, a substance used to disinfect tap water. The FDA allows up to 250.0 milligrams per liter of chloride in bottled water. See 21 CFR 165.110[b].

Iron. Iron is a metallic element. Your body needs some iron, but not too much. The FDA permits bottled water to contain up to 0.3 milligrams per liter of iron. See 21 CFR 165.110[b].

Manganese. Manganese resembles iron and is used in fertilizers. Bottled water may contain up to 0.05 milligrams per liter of manganese. See 21 CFR 165.110[b].

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Phenols. Phenols are corrosive, poisonous acidic compounds. Your bottled water may contain up to 0.001 milligrams per liter of phenols. See 21 CFR 165.110[b].

Dissolved solids. “Dissolved solids” is a catch-all phrase. The FDA allows bottled water to contain up to 500 milligrams per liter of dissolved solids, of whatever type. See 21 CFR 165.110[b].

Zinc. Zinc is a metallic element. Your body needs some zinc, but not too much. The FDA permits bottled water to contain up to 5.0 milligrams per liter of zinc. See 21 CFR 165.110[b].

Fluoride. Fluoride is purposely added to some bottled water. If so, the label should say so. In addition, bottled water that is not labeled as containing fluoride may contain up to 2.4 milligrams per liter of fluoride. See 21 CFR 165.110[b].

Chemical contaminants bottled water may have in it.

The FDA allows set levels of the following chemical contaminants in all bottled water. Amounts vary, but some are shocking, such as Barium. FDA regulations permit up to 2.0 milligrams per liter of barium. That is nearly the same as natural fluorides, even though barium is a toxic metallic element. Cyanide, another poison, is permitted in bottled water. See 21 CFR 165.110[b].

Here is a sampling of chemical contaminants bottled water has in it, along with the permitted milligrams per liter.

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  • Barium……………………………… 2.0
  • Chromium……………………………. 0.1
  • Copper……………………………… 1.0
  • Cyanide…………………………….. 0.2
  • Nickel……………………………… 0.1
  • Ethylbenzene (100-41-4)………………. 0.7
  • Monochlorobenzene (108-90-7)………….. 0.1
  • Styrene (100-42-5)…………………… 0.1
  • Toluene (108-88-3)…………………… 1.0
  • Xylenes (1330-20-7)………………….. 10.0

Pesticides bottled water may have in it.

The FDA allows set levels of pesticides in bottled water. There are set limits for each of 29 different pesticides. People who purchase bottled water believe, normally, that they are avoiding pesticides by doing so. For a listing of these pesticides, see 21 CFR 165.110[b].

Disinfectants bottled water may have in it.

The FDA allows bottled water to contain set levels of residual disinfectants and disinfection byproducts. Examples from 21 CFR 165.110[b]:

Disinfection byproducts:

  • Bromate…………………………… 0.010
  • Chlorite………………………….. 1.0
  • Haloacetic acids (five) (HAA5)………. 0.060
  • Total Trihalomethanes (TTHM)………… 0.080
  • Residual disinfectants:
  • Chloramine………………………… 4.0 (as Cl2)
  • Chlorine………………………….. 4.0 (as Cl2)
  • Chlorine dioxide…………………… 0.8 (as ClO2)

Radioactive materials bottled water may have in it.

The FDA allows bottled water to contain set levels of radioactive material. See 21 CFR 165.110[b]. Three examples:

“The bottled water shall not contain a combined radium-226 and radium-228 activity in excess of 5 picocuries per liter of water.”

“The bottled water shall not contain a gross alpha particle activity in excess of 15 picocuries per liter of water.”

“The bottled water shall not contain uranium in excess of 30 micrograms per liter of water.”

Bottled water has more in it than regulations allow.

When bottled water does not meet the standards set out by the FDA, it might still be sold. By law, it should bear a suitable label. Examples:

“Contains Excessive Bacteria”

“Contains Excessive Arsenic”

“Excessively Radioactive”

What You Can Do?

Take time to know what bottled water has in it. Look for bottlers’ web sites and compare information. Remember that bottled water does not mean absolute purity. Be sure yours is healthy drinking water.

Ban the Bottle and stay hydrated! Make it a habit to carry a glass or stainless-steel water bottle, neither of these materials leach anything into water. Making them healthy alternatives to plastic while reducing your out of pocket cost and the amount of waste that goes into the landfill. It’s a win-win!

References:

  1. https://www.nrdc.org/stories/truth-about-tap?gclid=Cj0KCQjw6MHdBRCtARIsAEigMxFMxCCtBGuEqAe_bFamDNhA0TqCiRtkcC_ANccVuc4xV0hQ43hDEUcaApYhEALw_wcB
  2. https://www.banthebottle.net/articles/the-true-ingredients-of-bottled-water/
  3. https://www.banthebottle.net/articles/7-bottled-water-myths-busted/
  4. http://www.foxnews.com/health/2014/01/13/more-than-24500-chemicals-found-in-bottled-water.html
  5. https://draxe.com/bottled-water-risks/
  6. https://www.ewg.org/news/news-releases/2008/10/15/harmful-chemicals-found-bottled-water#.W7C76mhKiUk
  7. https://www.ewg.org/research/bottled-water-quality-investigation/test-results-chemicals-bottled-water#.W7C772hKiUk
  8. https://www.ewg.org/tapwater/state-of-american-drinking-water.php#.W7C__GhKiUk
  9. https://www.nrdc.org/stories/whats-your-drinking-water
  10. https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/expert-answers/tap-vs-bottled-water/faq-20058017
  11. https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/mar/15/microplastics-found-in-more-than-90-of-bottled-water-study-says
  12. https://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-11193/7-reasons-to-never-drink-bottled-water-again.html

Red Clover

Red Clover – flower & leaf (Trifolium pratense)

Other Names: Beebread, Clovone, Cow Clover, Daidzein, Genistein, Isoflavone, Meadow Clover, Miel des Prés, Phytoestrogen, Purple Clover, Trebol Rojo, Trèfle Commun, Trèfle des Prés, Trèfle Pourpre, Trèfle Rouge, Trèfle Rougeâtre, Trèfle Violet, Trefoil.

Red clover is a low growing perennial, native to northwest Africa, Asia, and Europe. It has since been naturalized and cultivated in many parts of the world, including North America. The flower heads are collected in full bloom, during the summer months.

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Druids believed that it could ward off evil spells and witches, while Medieval Christians believed that the three lobbed leaves were associated with the trinity and the four lobbed leaves as a symbol of the cross.

Mother Jai’s Natural Detox Tea is blended with Red Clover Flower & Herb. Shop for yours below.

Trifolium pratense is used in traditional medicine of India as Deobstruent, Alterative,  Antipsoriatic,  Antiscrophulatic,  Antispasmodic,  Aperient,  Cancer,  Detergent,  Diuretic,  Expectorant,  Sedative,  Skin Tonic, Expectorant, Anti-inflammatory and Antidermatosis agent.

Edible parts: Although leaves can be tossed into a salad or used in a tea, the preferable part of this wild edible is the flower. Red clovers are the tastiest of all clovers although it is recommended not to eat too many of these as some people experience bloating.

Red clover is a source of many nutrients including calcium, chromium, magnesium, niacin, phosphorus, potassium, thiamine, and vitamin C. Red clover is a rich source of isoflavones (chemicals that act like estrogens and are found in many plants).

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RED CLOVER USES & EFFECTIVENESS

It is widely grown as a fodder crop, valued for its nitrogen fixation, which increases soil fertility. For these reasons, it is used as a green manure crop. Several cultivar groups have been selected for agricultural use, mostly derived from T. pratense var. sativum. It has become naturalized in many temperate areas, including the Americas and Australasia as an escape from cultivation.

In alternative medicine, red clover is promoted as a treatment for a variety of human maladies, including symptoms of menopause, coughs, disorders of the lymphatic system and a variety of cancers. Several systemic reviews and meta-analyses concluded that red clover extract reduces the frequency of menopause hot flashes.

Red clover is used for cancer prevention, indigestion, high cholesterol, whooping cough, cough, asthma, bronchitis, and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).

Some women use red clover for symptoms of menopause such as hot flashes; for breast pain or tenderness (mastalgia); and for premenstrual syndrome (PMS).

Red clover is applied to the skin for skin cancer, skin sores, burns, and chronic skin diseases including eczema and psoriasis.

Research on Red Clover

High cholesterol in women. Research shows that taking red clover extracts by mouth for 3 months to a year does not seem reduce low-density lipoprotein (LDL or “bad”) cholesterol or increase high-density lipoprotein (HDL or “good”) cholesterol in women who have moderately elevated cholesterol levels.

Weak bones (osteoporosis). Some early research suggests that taking red clover daily for 6 months increased bone mineral density and healthy postmenopausal women. However, most evidence suggests that taking red clover does not improve osteoporosis.

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Red clover contains hormone-like chemicals called isoflavones that seem to cause reproductive problems in certain animals. Experts think a diet high in isoflavones may have been responsible for reports of reproductive failure and liver disease in cheetahs living in zoos. In large quantities, red clover can cause sterility in livestock. Red clover contains “isoflavones” which are changed in the body to “phytoestrogens” that are similar to the hormone estrogen.

Hair loss (alopecia). Early research shows that applying a combination product containing red clover flower extract increases hair growth in people with hair loss.

Symptoms of an enlarged prostate gland (benign prostatic hyperplasia). Research suggests that red clover supplements might improve some symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). It seems to decrease nighttime urination and improve the quality of life in men with BPH. However, red clover does not seem to affect urine flow rate, prostatic-specific antigen (PSA) values, or prostate size.

Breast cancer. Early evidence shows that taking a specific red clover extract (Promensil) daily for one year does not increase breast tissue density, suggesting that it might not affect breast cancer risk. Cancer of the lining of the uterus (endometrial cancer). Early research suggests that taking red clover supplements does not help prevent endometrial cancer.

Cyclical breast pain. There is some early evidence that red clover might relieve cyclic breast pain and tenderness.

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Menopause symptoms. There are contradictory research findings about the effects of red clover on symptoms of menopause. Most research shows that taking red clover by mouth for up to a year does not reduce menopause symptoms such as hot flashes or night sweats, although some research shows that a specific red clover product (Promensil, Novogen) might reduce severity but not the frequency of hot flashes. However, other research shows that a different form of red clover (MF11RCE, Melbrosin International) might improve symptoms of menopause-related anxiety and depression.

Postmenopausal conditions. Some early evidence suggests that red clover may improve some secondary conditions associated with postmenopause. These effects include reducing blood pressure and improving cholesterol levels in postmenopausal women. However, red clover does not seem to improve thinking skills.

HEALTH BENEFITS OF RED CLOVER

Reduces Hypertension: The unique properties of red clover include its ability to reduce inflammation throughout the body, particularly in the cardiovascular system. Studies have linked the use of its tea to a significant reduction in the tension of arteries and blood vessels, therefore reducing blood pressure. This can help to prevent coronary heart diseases and a variety of other cardiovascular conditions.

Boosts Immune System: If you consume the greens of red clover, you are much more likely to get a high dose of vitamin C than if you consume the tea. Vitamin C is a powerful immune system booster and can help to stimulate the production of white blood cells.

Prevents Infections: If you consume the leaves in the form of tea, you can get a healthy dose of antioxidants. Antioxidants can neutralize free radicals, which cause degenerative diseases and cell mutation. The overall immune boost of red clover includes preventing infections, both viral and bacterial.

Eases Menstruation & Menopause: The hormonal impacts of red clover are significant, particularly in women. The isoflavones found in red clover mimic estrogen, so for women who may struggle to maintain estrogen levels, red clover can help to balance their hormonal shifts and prevent mood swings, as well as reduce breast pain. This applies to women undergoing PMS as well as menopause, as both of these times can cause dangerous or unpredictable fluctuations in hormone levels.

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Prevents Cancer: Red clover is not only useful for women, however, and in terms of cancer prevention, it is extremely important for men. Prostate cancer is one of the most dangerous forms of cancer in men, and some of the compounds found in it can block certain enzymes that could cause prostate growth. Although some forms of prostate enlargement are benign, a reduction in prostate size is always a good thing for long-term male health.

Cholesterol-lowering Properties: If you struggle to maintain healthy cholesterol levels, you significantly increase your chances of heart attacks and strokes as a result of atherosclerosis. Therefore, anything that can lower cholesterol levels is valuable, and research has shown that LDL cholesterol levels can be reduced by adding red clover.

Blood Circulation: Furthermore, coumarins found in red clover have been shown to keep blood flowing smoothly and stimulating healthy circulation, further preventing high blood pressure and cardiovascular distress.

Detoxify the Body: If you want to find a quick way to detoxify your body and clear your system of excess toxins and salts, nothing works better than a diuretic. Red clover has been connected to increased urination, thereby helping to release excess water, toxins, and even fat from the body.

TREATMENTS WITH RED CLOVER

Cardiovascular health: Researchers theorize that red clover might help protect against heart disease, but studies in humans have not found strong evidence. Red clover isoflavones have been associated with an increase in HDL (“good”) cholesterol in pre and postmenopausal women, but other studies show conflicting results. One study found that menopausal women taking red clover supplements had stronger, more flexible arteries (called arterial compliance), which can help prevent heart disease. Red clover may also have blood-thinning properties, which keeps blood clots from forming. It appears to improve blood flow.

Menopause: Researchers think that isoflavones, like those found in red clover, might help reduce symptoms of menopause, such as hot flashes and night sweats, because of their estrogen-like effects. So far studies have been mixed. Several studies of a proprietary extract of red clover isoflavones suggest that it may significantly reduce hot flashes in menopausal women. However, the largest study showed no effect.

Osteoporosis: As estrogen levels drop during menopause, a woman’s risk for developing osteoporosis (significant bone loss) goes up. A few studies suggest that a proprietary extract of red clover isoflavones may slow bone loss and even boost bone mineral density in pre- and perimenopausal women. But the evidence is preliminary, and more research is needed.

Cancer: Based on its traditional use for cancer, researchers have begun to study the role of isoflavones from red clover in cancer prevention and treatment. Preliminary evidence suggests these isoflavones may stop cancer cells from growing or kill cancer cells in test tubes. Researchers theorize that red clover may help prevent some forms of cancer, such as prostate and endometrial cancer. However, because of the herb’s estrogen-like effects, it might also contribute to the growth of some cancers, just as estrogen does. Until further research is done, doctors cannot recommend red clover to prevent cancer. Women with a history of breast cancer should not take red clover.

Other uses: Traditionally, red clover ointments have been applied to the skin to treat psoriasis, eczema, and other rashes. Red clover has also been used as a cough remedy for children. More recently, studies have shown that women using red clover may experience psychological benefits.

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

Red clover is available in a variety of preparations, including teas, tinctures, tablets, capsules, liquid extract, and extracts standardized to specific isoflavone contents. It can also be prepared as an ointment for topical (skin) application. Due to lack of long-term studies, self treatment should not exceed 3 to 6 months without the supervision of a health care professional.

Pediatric: Red clover has been used traditionally as a short-term cough remedy for children. Products containing isolated red clover isoflavones are very different than the whole herb, however, and are not recommended for children. DO NOT give a child red clover without talking to your pediatrician first.

Adult: Dose may vary from person to person, but general guidelines are as follows:

Dried herb (used for tea): 1 to 2 tsp dried flowers or flowering tops steeped in 8 oz. hot water for 1/2 hour; drink 2 to 3 cups daily

Powdered herb (available in capsules): 40 to 160 mg per day, or 28 to 85 mg of red clover isoflavones

Tincture (1:5, 30% alcohol): 60 to 100 drops (3 to 5 mL), 3 times per day; may add to hot water as a tea

Fluid Extract (1:1): 1 mL, 3 times per day; may add to hot water as a tea

Standardized red clover isoflavone extracts: follow directions on product labels carefully

Topical treatment (such as for psoriasis or eczema): an infusion, liquid extract, or ointment containing 10 to 15% flower heads; apply as needed unless irritation develops. DO NOT apply to an open wound without a doctor’s supervision.

RED CLOVER SIDE EFFECTS & SAFETY

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Red clover is LIKELY SAFE when taken by mouth in amounts commonly found in food. However, it is LIKELY UNSAFE when taken by mouth in medicinal amounts. Red clover acts like estrogen and might disturb important hormone balances during pregnancy or breast-feeding. Don’t use it. Not enough is known about the safety of red clover when applied to the skin during pregnancy or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and don’t use it.

Bleeding disorders: Red clover might increase the chance of bleeding. Avoid large amounts and use with caution.

Hormone-sensitive conditions such as breast cancer, uterine cancer, ovarian cancer, endometriosis, or uterine fibroids: Red clover might act like estrogen. If you have any condition that might be made worse by exposure to estrogen, don’t use red clover.

Protein S deficiency: People with protein S deficiency have an increased risk of forming blood clots. There is some concern that red clover might increase the risk of clot formation in these people because it has some of the effects of estrogen. Don’t use red clover if you have protein S deficiency.

Surgery: Red clover might slow blood clotting. It might increase the chance of extra bleeding during and after surgery. Stop taking red clover at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

RED CLOVER INTERACTIONS

Birth control pills (Contraceptive drugs) interacts with RED CLOVER: Some birth control pills contain estrogen. Red clover might have some of the same effects as estrogen. But red clover isn’t as strong as the estrogen in birth control pills. Taking red clover along with birth control pills might decrease the effectiveness of birth control pills. If you take birth control pills along with red clover, use an additional form of birth control such as a condom. Some birth control pills include ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel (Triphasil), ethinyl estradiol and norethindrone (Ortho-Novum 1/35, Ortho-Novum 7/7/7), and others.

Estrogens interacts with RED CLOVER: Large amounts of red clover might have some of the same effects as estrogen. But red clover isn’t as strong as estrogen pills. Taking red clover along with estrogen pills might decrease the effects of estrogen pills. Some estrogen pills include conjugated equine estrogens (Premarin), ethinyl estradiol, estradiol, and others.

Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) substrates) interacts with RED CLOVER. Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Red clover might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Taking red clover along with some medications that are broken down by the liver can increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before taking red clover, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver. Some medications that are changed by the liver include amitriptyline (Elavil), haloperidol (Haldol), ondansetron (Zofran), propranolol (Inderal), theophylline (Theo-Dur, others), verapamil (Calan, Isoptin, others), and others.

Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) substrates) interacts with RED CLOVER. Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Red clover might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Taking red clover along with some medications that are broken down by the liver can increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before taking red clover, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver. Some medications that are changed by the liver include omeprazole (Prilosec), lansoprazole (Prevacid), and pantoprazole (Protonix); diazepam (Valium); carisoprodol (Soma); nelfinavir (Viracept); and others.

Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9) substrates) interacts with RED CLOVER. Red clover might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Taking red clover along with some medications that are broken down by the liver can increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before taking red clover, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver. Some medications that are changed by the liver include diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), ibuprofen (Motrin), meloxicam (Mobic), and piroxicam (Feldene); celecoxib (Celebrex); amitriptyline (Elavil); warfarin (Coumadin); glipizide (Glucotrol); losartan (Cozaar); and others.

Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) substrates) interacts with RED CLOVER. Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Red clover might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Taking red clover along with some medications that are broken down by the liver can increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before taking red clover, talk to your healthcare provider if you are taking any medications that are changed by the liver. Some medications changed by the liver include lovastatin (Mevacor), ketoconazole (Nizoral), itraconazole (Sporanox), fexofenadine (Allegra), triazolam (Halcion), and many others.

Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs) interacts with RED CLOVER. Large amounts of red clover might slow blood clotting. Taking red clover along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding. Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.

Tamoxifen (Nolvadex) interacts with RED CLOVER. Some types of cancer are affected by hormones in the body. Estrogen-sensitive cancers are cancers that are affected by estrogen levels in the body. Tamoxifen (Nolvadex) is used to help treat and prevent these types of cancer. Red clover seems to also affect estrogen levels in the body. By affecting estrogen in the body, red clover might decrease the effectiveness of tamoxifen (Nolvadex). Do not take red clover if you are taking tamoxifen (Nolvadex).

Recipes from EdibleWildFood.com

Clover Syrup

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups red (and white) clover flowers
  • 2 1/2 cups water
  • 2 tbsp lemon juice
  • 3 1/2 cups organic cane sugar

Instructions:

Boil the flowers for about 10 minutes or until the color comes out of the flowers. Strain and measure 2 1/4 cups liquid (add water if needed).

Return to pot. Add lemon juice and sugar. Bring to a full rolling boil then reduce heat. Simmer until liquid becomes syrupy.

Pour into a bottle or jar and store in the fridge up to 6 months.

Red Clover Biscuits

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups unbleached flour + extra for rolling
  • 1/2 cup almond flour
  • 1 tbsp baking powder
  • 1/3 cup butter at room temperature
  • 2 eggs (beaten)
  • 1/2 cup plain yogurt
  • 1/4 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 cup dried or fresh red clover flowers (broken down)

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

In a bowl combine flour, almond flour, and baking powder. Add butter and knead until fully blended.

In a separate bowl, mix eggs, yogurt, and vanilla. Add in red clover flowers and blend well. Gradually add to the dough until it is completely blended.

Roll out dough on a lightly floured surface to a thickness of almost 1/2″. Use a cookie cutter about 1½” in diameter and cut.

Bake on an ungreased baking sheet for 15 minutes or until golden brown.

Serve (preferably) warm with jam or jelly.

Red Clover Ice Tea

Ingredients:

  • 12 red clover flowers (with leaves is fine)
  • 8 cups water
  • 3/4 cup organic can sugar (or sweetener of your choice)
  • one half lemon, squeezed

Instructions:

Boil water in a saucepan, then remove from stove and allow to cool 10 minutes. Place red clover flowers in water; let infuse minimum 1/2 hour. (For a stronger flavour and more nutrients allow to sit 1-2 hours.)

Strain, add sweetener of your choice and the fresh squeezed lemon juice. (The amount of sweetener can be reduced or increased based on your taste buds.) Place in ridge to chill then enjoy!

Makes 8 one cup servings.

References:

  1. https://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-308-red%20clover.aspx?activeingredientid=308&
  2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trifolium_pratense
  3. http://practicalplants.org/wiki/Trifolium_pratense
  4. http://www.pfaf.org/USER/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Trifolium+pratense
  5. http://www.illinoiswildflowers.info/weeds/plants/red_clover.htm
  6. http://www.umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/herb/red-clover
  7. http://www.ediblewildfood.com/red-clover.aspx
  8. https://www.dr.hauschka.com/en_GB/knowledge-base/medicinal-plant-facts/red-clover/
  9. http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/174713/0
  10. https://online.epocrates.com/u/1183107/Trifolium+pratense
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Why use Raw Honey?

Raw Honey

Raw honey is best described as honey “as it exists in the beehive.” It is extracted from the beehive, strained and poured straight into the bottle, bypassing commercial processing methods. Raw and regular honey differ mainly in how they are processed. Raw honey contains pollen, may be more nutritious and does not have any added sugars or sweeteners, both of which may be present in commercial honeys.

Most of the health benefits of honey can be attributed to its antioxidants and enzymes. Because commercial honeys are processed, they may have lower levels of antioxidants. Raw and organic honey are subject to different regulations in different countries. In the US, there is no rule that organic honey can’t be heated or processed, which means it may not be raw. While raw honey is safe for healthy adults, it can be dangerous for infants and pregnant women. It may contain spores of the bacteria Clostridium botulinum, which can grow in the gut of developing infants.

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Mother Jai hand blends her Lip balm with High Altitude Raw Honey and Beeswax from Del Norte, Colorado. Shop for yours below.

Raw Honey Is More Nutritious

Raw honey contains a wide variety of nutrients. It has approximately 22 amino acids, 31 different minerals and a wide range of vitamins and enzymes. However, the nutrients are only present in trace amounts. What’s most impressive about raw honey is that it contains nearly 30 types of bioactive plant compounds. These are called polyphenols, and they act as antioxidants. Many studies have linked these antioxidants with impressive health benefits, including reduced inflammation and a lower risk of heart disease and certain cancers.

Conversely, commercial honeys may contain fewer antioxidants due to processing methods. For example, one study compared the antioxidants in raw and processed honey from a local market. They found that the raw honey contained up to 4.3 times more antioxidants than the processed variety.

Most Regular Honey Doesn’t Contain Any Pollen

Bees travel from flower to flower collecting nectar and pollen. The nectar and pollen are taken back to the beehive, where they are packed into the honeycomb and eventually become a food source for the bees. Bee pollen is surprisingly nutritious and contains over 250 substances, including vitamins, amino acids, essential fatty acids, micronutrients and antioxidants. In fact, the German Federal Ministry of Health recognizes bee pollen as a medicine.

Bee pollen has been linked to many impressive health benefits. Studies have found that it may help fight inflammation and improve liver function. It also has properties that may help fight against heart disease and stroke. Unfortunately, processing methods like heat treatment and ultrafiltration can remove bee pollen. For example, one unofficial study analyzed 60 samples of commercial honey brands in the US and discovered that over 75% of all samples contained no pollen.

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Regular Honey May Have Hidden Sugars or Sweeteners

Approximately 400 million pounds of honey are consumed in the US each year. Because honey is so popular, it’s hard to meet this high demand from local suppliers alone. This is why approximately 70% of the honey consumed in the US is imported. However, there is serious concern worldwide about regular honey being contaminated with sugar or other sweeteners like high fructose corn syrup.

Risks of Eating Raw Honey

Raw honey can contain spores of the bacteria Clostridium botulinum. This bacteria is especially harmful to babies, children under the age of one and pregnant women. It may cause botulism poisoning, which results in life-threatening paralysis. However, botulism is very rare among healthy adults and older children. As the body ages, the gut develops enough to stop the botulinum spores from growing. That said, if you experience side effects such as nausea, vomiting and diarrhea soon after eating raw honey, you should see your doctor immediately.

References:

  1. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/raw-honey-vs-regular
  2. https://draxe.com/the-many-health-benefits-of-raw-honey/
  3. https://www.benefits-of-honey.com/raw-honey.html
  4. https://blog.paleohacks.com/raw-honey/
  5. http://www.naturallivingideas.com/raw-honey-benefits/
  6. https://www.swansonvitamins.com/blog/guest-authors-on-natural-health/raw-honey-the-complete-story
  7. https://www.thehoneyjarhome.com/what-is-raw-honey
  8. https://www.reallyrawhoney.com/
  9. https://www.globalhealingcenter.com/natural-health/health-benefits-of-organic-locally-grown-raw-honey/
  10. https://www.organics.org/differences-between-honey-and-raw-organic-honey/

Powdered Milk

Powdered Milk

Milk itself has been used as a powerful skin cleanser and beauty enhancer since ancient times – Cleopatra was known for her infamous milk baths that kept her looking youthful and captivatingly beautiful. Today, not all of us have the time or luxury to fill up an entire bathtub with milk and have a deep relaxing soak.

Well, the thing about milk powder is that it all its water content is completely evaporated and only the solid material is left behind. This means that milk powder is more potent, powerful and effective than liquid milk. Milk powder will have a higher concentration of vitamins and minerals than liquid milk since it is in a concentrated solid form.

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Try Mother Jai’s Mineral Milk Bath for face packs, milk baths, and exfoliating scrubs. Powdered milk and buttermilk, baking soda, Epsom salt, and powdered oatmeal come together for a wonderfully healing, toning, and soothing blend perfect for any skin type. Use in the bath or the shower with amazing results. Get yours below.

Here are the nutrients in milk powder that make it effective as a homemade skin remedy:

  • Lactic Acid – Smooths, tones, tightens & lightens skin
  • Vitamin C – Highly antiaging, promotes youthful, radiant skin
  • Vitamin B6 – Necessary for new skin cell formation. Keeps skin moisturized and healthy.
  • Vitamin A – Essential for healthy cell division, heals dull skin
  • Calcium – Boosts collagen production, maintains skin elasticity
  • Potassium – Hydrates and moisturizes. Heals dry itchy skin
  • Magnesium – Promotes youthful radiant skin, anti-aging effects

10 Benefits of Milk Powder Face Pack & Face Mask:

  • It acts as a cleanser
  • It gives your skin a youthful glow
  • It contains high concentrations of vitamins and minerals
  • The lactic acid in it lightens and smoothens skin
  • It helps heal dull skin
  • It gives the new skin formation a boost
  • It helps boost collagen
  • It hydrates your skin
  • It has the property to heal itchy skin
  • A milk powder face pack eradicates blackheads as well as whiteheads

Some Ways to Use Powdered Milk for Healthy, Glowing Skin

For Lighter Skin:

  • All you need is 2 tsp. of freshly squeezed orange juice, 1 tsp. of oatmeal powder and 1 tsp. of milk powder
  • Mix all these ingredients in a bowl to form a paste
  • Wash your face with Olay moisturizing face wash and apply this paste to your face
  • Keep it on for 20 minutes and then wash off with cold water

To Treat Hyperpigmentation:

  • For this mask, you’ll need 2 tsp. of milk powder, 2 tsp. of yoghurt and half a lemon’s juice
  • After mixing these ingredients, you’ll get a thick paste
  • Soak a towel in warm water and steam your face with it, this will help open your pores
  • Now apply the paste to your face and leave it on for 20 minutes until it dries
  • Repeat this treatment every 2nd day and your skin tone will magically even out

Goodbye Pimples:

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  • This nutritious mask will require 1 tsp. of turmeric, 2 tsp. of milk powder and 1 tbsp. of honey
  • After mixing these ingredients together, apply it to your face evenly
  • Let the mask dry out and wash it off with lukewarm water
  • You need to repeat this milk powder face pack for dry skin twice a week, to get rid of that pesky acne as well as its blemishes

To Treat Oily Skin:

This milk powder face pack for oily skin only requires two ingredients – 1 tbsp. of fuller’s earth or multani mitti, and 1 tbsp. of milk powder

Mix both these ingredients in some water or rose water if you wish to get a smooth paste

Smear on your face evenly and let it dry thoroughly

Wash it off with lukewarm water to reveal fresher skin instantly

Make an exfoliating scrub. To get rid of that top layer of skin and expose a brand new you, use milk to exfoliate. Take 1 cup of milk and 3 tablespoons of oatmeal and apply it to your skin, gently rubbing it in. The oats provide the grittiness while the milk provides the nourishment.

Allow it time to dry. Then rinse it off with warm water, scrubbing gently. If you’d like to make this in advance, make it with powdered milk and store in your refrigerator.

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Or you can soak 1/2 cup of almonds in milk overnight. Then in the morning, grind ‘er up into a paste and apply to your skin, following the same drying and washing routine.

Use it as a toner. If you’re not crazy on the idea of soaking your face in a layer of milk overnight, just use it as a toner. Apply milk to your face with a saturated cotton ball, leave it on for at least 15 minutes, and rinse well. With repeated use, it can bring out your skin’s natural glow.

Use it to shrink your pores. It isn’t just milk that can do your skin good — it’s all those dairy products, too. If you’re looking to shrink your pores, get sour — with sour cream or buttermilk. All you need do is apply a thin layer to your skin and let it soak in for 15 to 20 minutes. Rinse it off with warm water and rinse it well.

Recipes

Milk Powder Face Pack

Ingredients:

  • Milk Powder (2 small pouches or 2-3 table spoons)
  • Rose Water

Directions:

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Mix the ingredients in a small bowl. Pour very little of rose water and make a smooth paste. The consistency would be very watery and thin. Apply a thick layer on the face and leave it on til it dries. After 15-20 minutes, the mask starts to harden gradually (it takes a little time) into a white layer on the face. After the complete mask hardens, remove the mask by taking a little water and gently scrubbing it off. Wash off and moisturize. The result is a supple and brighter skin which feels extremely soft. The mask is so gentle that it can be applied daily. You can use any liquid in place of rose water.

Skin Lightening Face Pack

Ingredients:

  • 1 tsp of Powdered Milk
  • 1 – 2 tsp Orange Juice
  • 1 tsp of Colloidal Oatmeal

Directions:

In a bowl, mix the dry ingredients, milk powder and gram flour evenly. Then squeeze in about 1 – 2 tsp of orange juice. Please make sure you use fresh orange juice and not store-bought synthetic orange juice. Now mix everything together and make a thick paste. Add more orange juice if necessary. Using clean fingers, apply this paste onto your already cleaned face and allow it to work its magic for 10 – 15 minutes. Wash off with cold water and pat your face dry with a clean towel.

Milk Powder Face Mask for Acne & Acne Scars

Ingredients:

  • 1 tsp of Powdered Milk
  • ¼ tsp of Turmeric
  • 1 tsp of Organic Liquid Honey

Directions:

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In a small bowl, measure out and put in your milk powder, turmeric and honey and mix it thoroughly with a spoon. If you have fair skin, you may want to use a little less turmeric. Now apply this thick paste onto your clean face with the back of the spoon itself. Allow the mask to settle for 10 – 15 minutes and then wash off with warm water and pat dry with face tissues.

Myrtle Oil

Myrtus communis (flowers with Puccinia psidii). Location: Maui, Lower Kimo Rd Kula http://www.starrenvironmental.com/

Myrtle leaf oil (Myrtus communis)

Myrtle essential oil comes from the same family as eucalyptus, tea tree, bayberry and English bog myrtle. It is a small tree or large bush with lots of small, tough branches, small shaply pointed leaves and flowers followed by small, black berries. The leaves and flowers have a prominent fragrance.

Myrtle has been used in herbal medicine since ancient Egyptian times, as there are records showing the leaves being steeped in wine to combat fever and infection. The plant was dedicated to Aphrodite in Ancient Greece and Dioscórides prescribed macerated Myrtle wine to patients suffering from lung and bladder infections, as well as for tuberculosis. Dr Delious de Savgnac (1876) recommended Myrtle for the treatment of hemorrhoids, pulmonary infections, genital infections and problems with the bladder and urinary system.

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The therapeutic properties of myrtle essential oil are anticatarrhal, antiseptic, astringent, bactericidal, expectorant and balsamic. The main chemical components are alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, limonene, cineole, alpha-terpinen-4-ol, myrtenol, geraniol, linalyl acetate, myrtenyl acetate and carvacrol.

Blends well with: atlas, bergamot, benzoin, black pepper, cedarwood, clary sage, clove, coriander, elmi, eucalyptus, frankincense, ginger, hyssop, jasmine, lavender, lemongrass, melissa, myrrh, neroli, peppermint, rose, rosemary, rosewood, spearmint, thyme, tea tree and ylang ylang essential oils.

Precautions: It is classed as a non-toxic, non-irritant and non-sensitizing oil – excessive use of it can lead to headaches and nausea.

Uses for Myrtle oil

Myrtle essential oil is primarily used for chronic pulmonary conditions, to expel phlegm and catarrh from the lungs. It is useful for acne prone skin and also as a sleeping aid, to uplift, refresh and restore. Myrtle oil is said to be of great benefit in helping people to cope with withdrawal from addiction. It has an uplifting effect on the body and mind and is helpful when used in cases of self-destructive behavior – it is said to cleanse the inner being and dissolve disharmony.

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Myrtle, along with willow tree bark, occupies a prominent place in the writings of Hippocrates, Pliny, Dioscorides, Galen, and the Arabian writers. It has been prescribed for fever and pain by ancient physicians since at least 2,500 BC in Sumer. Myrtle’s effects are due to high levels of salicylic acid, a compound related to aspirin and the basis of the modern class of drugs known as NSAIDs.

CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2256192

Nutritional Value of Myrtle

Myrtle leaves and fruit contains a unique combination of organic compounds and nutrients that make it not only an interesting dietary addition as an herb but also as an invaluable source of essential oil. Myrtle contains various antioxidants and flavonoid compounds, including myricetin, as well as quercetin, catechin, citric and malic acids, linalool, pinene, tannins, and other sugars.

Benefits of Using Myrtle Essential Oil

Aphrodisiac: associated with Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love. It works very well to alleviate problems like impotency, frigidity, erectile dysfunctions, and loss of libido.

Anticancer Potential: highly praised for its high levels of antioxidants, including quercetin, tannins, myricetin, and catechin. These antioxidants have been widely studied and have been found to have anti-carcinogenic and anti-mutagenic properties. According to a research report in Natural Product Communications Journal, myrtle is quite similar in chemical composition to sandalwood, which has been connected to a reduction in prostate and breast cancer.

Astringent Properties: If used in mouthwash, myrtle essential oil makes the gums contract and strengthen their hold on the teeth. If ingested, it also makes the intestinal tracts and muscles contract. Furthermore, it contracts and tightens the skin and helps to diminish wrinkles. It can also help stop hemorrhaging by inducing the blood vessels to contract.

Eases Breathing: counters the accumulation of phlegm and catarrh in the respiratory tracts. This property also curbs the formation of mucus and provides relief from coughs and breathing trouble.

Eliminates Bad Odor: It can be used in incense sticks and burners, fumigants, and vaporizers as room fresheners. It can also be used as a body deodorant or perfume. It has no side effects like itching, irritation or patches on the skin like certain commercial deodorants.

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Expectorant: reduces the presence and further deposition of phlegm. It also clears congestion of the nasal tracts, bronchi, and lungs resulting from colds and provides good relief from coughing.

Fights Infections: inhibits infections since it is a bactericidal, germicidal, fungicidal, and antiviral substance. It also helps to reduce infections in the stomach and intestines, while helping to stop diarrhea.

Hormone Balance: Extensive research has been conducted around the world regarding the effects of myrtle essential oil on the endocrine system, primarily in regulation of the thyroid gland. It has been shown that myrtle essential oil, whether consumed or inhaled, can positively affect the release of hormones, including those related to the ovaries and women’s reproductive health.

Maintains Healthy Nerves: It maintains the stability of the nerves and keeps you from becoming nervous or unnecessarily stressed over small issues. It is a beneficial agent against nervous and neurotic disorders, shaking limbs, fear, vertigo, anxiety, and stress.

Prevents Infections: This property makes myrtle essential oil a suitable substance to apply on wounds. It does not let microbes infect the wounds and thereby protects against sepsis and tetanus, in case of an iron object being the cause of the damage.

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Relaxes the Body: The essential oil of myrtle relaxes and sedates. This property also provides relief from tension, stress, annoyance, anger, distress, and depression, as well as from inflammation, irritation, and various allergies.

Myrtle can be used for skin care and against hemorrhoids, acne, pimples, cystitis, infections in the urinary tract, and chronic problems like leucorrhea. And, it is effective against chest infections in both babies and the elderly.

Words of Caution: There is no inherent risk in using myrtle essential oil, but as always, pay attention to your body’s reaction to any new substance or supplement, and consult a doctor if anything unusual occurs.

References:

https://www.aromaweb.com/essential-oils/myrtle-oil.asp

https://www.rockymountainoils.com/myrtle.html/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24706627

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https://essentialoils.co.za/essential-oils/myrtle.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myrtus

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/6fcd/0559ad9e36b544d09f503040df4d63e151c5.pdf

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/b0db/33d673dd4f71b8075dc1dafd5ca30765c2ec.pdf

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10496475.2011.556986

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0944501313001766

https://www.mdpi.com/1420-3049/23/10/2502

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/283500310_Identify_the_essential_oils_in_Myrtus_communis_L_leaves

https://www.organicfacts.net/myrtle-essential-oil.html