Why We Should Avoid Petrolatum

White Petrolatum – By Kiyok – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2647443

What is Petroleum Jelly or Petrolatum?

Petroleum jelly is a byproduct of the oil refining process. This means it is not sustainable or eco-friendly, and it also explains some of the potential problems with using it. Petroleum jelly was originally found in the bottom of oil rigs and is further refined for use in the beauty industry. According to packaging and safety info, all of the harmful components are removed before use in beauty or personal care products, but some sources argue that it still contains some harmful components (like hydrocarbons).

Petrolatum, commonly known as petroleum jelly, is a byproduct of petroleum refining. Petrolatum is a soft paraffin or wax mixture sold as a topical skin ointment. It is acknowledged by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as an approved over-the-counter skin protectant and is used in the manufacturing of cosmetic skin care.

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Petroleum jelly, petrolatum, white petrolatum, soft paraffin/paraffin wax or multi-hydrocarbon, CAS number 8009-03-8, is a semi-solid mixture of hydrocarbons (with carbon numbers mainly higher than 25), originally promoted as a topical ointment for its healing properties.

The Environmental Working Group (EWG), a U.S. non-profit organization that does environmental and safety studies, says there’s petrolatum in one out of every 14 cosmetic products on the market, including 15 percent of lipsticks and 40 percent of baby lotions and oils. Plus, it is used as an active ingredient for healing cuts and burns.

The EWG says ’and governments and the CCTFA acknowledge’ there is a risk of contamination from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), cancer-causing chemicals found in crude oil and its by-products. While no studies have ever shown a direct link between petrolatum and cancer, the European Union put numerous grades of petrolatum on a list of dangerous substances. Only highly refined petrolatum can be used in cosmetics there.

How Does Petroleum Jelly Work on Skin?

Petroleum jelly is used in everything from lotions to baby products for its ability to create a protective barrier on the skin and hold in moisture. On labels, it may also appear as Petrolatum, Mineral oil, Liquid paraffin, or Paraffin oil.

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While the ability to hold in moisture may seem like a good thing, it can have its downsides as well. Since petroleum jelly is both waterproof and not water soluble, it creates a waterproof barrier on the skin. At first glance, this may sound good, but it also means that it blocks pores and can lock in residue and bacteria. This is also the reason petroleum jelly should not be used on a burn or sunburn, as it locks in heat and can block the body’s ability to heal.

Also, while it certainly gives the appearance of hydrated and moisturized skin, this may be an illusion as there is nothing in petroleum jelly that is actually nourishing the skin.

Petroleum jelly can’t be metabolized by the skin and just sits as a barrier until it wears off. This means that the body isn’t able to gain any benefit from petroleum jelly (like it can from nutrient rich substances like shea butter or cocoa butter), and there is concern that some of the components (like hydrocarbons) may be stored in fat tissue within the body.

There is strong evidence that mineral oil hydrocarbons are the greatest contaminant of the human body, amounting to approximately 1 g per person. Possible routes of contamination include air inhalation, food intake, and dermal absorption.

This suggests the potential for long-term accumulation of these hydrocarbons in the body. The study found no link between nutritional habits and hydrocarbon levels in the body but did find a strong potential link between cosmetic and beauty product use and contamination, suggesting that beauty products may be a major source of hydrocarbon exposure.

As moms, this study is especially interesting, since it shows the potential for passing on these contaminants to our children during breastfeeding. We also know that we can’t metabolize these substances, so they can build up in the body and are difficult to remove.

Collagen Breakdown

Because of the barrier that mineral oil/petroleum jelly creates on the skin, there is also some concern about its potential to cause collagen breakdown (which is the opposite of what most women want!). Essentially, the concern is that when petroleum jelly coats the skin it blocks the skin’s natural ability to breathe and absorb nutrients. This can slow the cell renewal process and cause the skin to pull the necessary moisture and nutrients from within, leading to collagen breakdown over time (aka wrinkles!).

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Estrogen Dominance

A growing problem in today’s world, estrogen dominance is when the body has high levels of estrogen and proportionately low levels of progesterone to balance it. It is linked to infertility, menstrual problems, accelerated aging, allergies and autoimmune problems as well as nutrient deficiencies, sleep problems and even some types of cancers.

Many products (including petroleum jelly) contain chemicals called xenoestrogens which may increase estrogen problems in the body. Studies have shown that these chemicals may act on hormone receptors in the body and lead to estrogen dominance.

Does it heal skin?

While some beauty companies are promoting petrolatum alternatives, other manufacturers swear by its ability to moisturize and heal. Petrolatum seals off the skin from water and air, as it allows the skin to heal itself.

But there’s a potential downside. A study that was published in Pediatrics in 2000 found that extremely-low-birth-weight infants treated with petroleum jelly were more likely to develop systemic candidiasis; it created a warm, moist place for fungi to grow.

Petrolatum is an occlusive barrier, locking in moisture but it does not allow moisture to be absorbed from the atmosphere. For example, lip balms with petrolatum and other petrochemicals can be less moisturizing than those with emollients that enable moisture exchange.

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Alternatives to Petroleum Based Products for the Skin

Thankfully, there are many great alternatives to petroleum jelly and mineral oil that help increase moisture on the skin and provide nourishment as well. The best part? Most of them can be used alone and you don’t even have to make anything!

Looking for a simple alternative to petroleum jelly or petrolatum? Try Mother Jai’s Moisturizer. Simply all natural with Coconut, Olive and Sunflower Oils. A little goes a long way.

Shea Butter– A natural skin superfood that is high in Vitamins A, E and F. It also contains beneficial fatty acids that nourish skin and it may reduce skin inflammation and increase collagen production. It is excellent on its own or in homemade beauty products.

Cocoa Butter-A great source of antioxidants and beneficial fatty acids, cocoa butter is another great product for skin. There is even some evidence that it may reduce the signs of aging.

Beeswax– A great substitute for the waterproof and protective properties of petroleum jelly without the hydrocarbons. Though not usually used alone, beeswax can be blended into homemade beauty products for its skin-protective ability and is especially good in lip balms and body creams.

Coconut Oil– Coconut oil has so many benefits, internal and external, and it can be great for the skin. It does cause breakouts in some people, so I always suggest testing on a small area of skin first, but it is a source of skin-nourishing fatty acids, lauric acid and anti-inflammatory compounds.

Almond Oil– A liquid oil that is fragrance free and nourishing to skin.

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Sunflower Oil – Another liquid oil that is full of nutrients like omega fatty acids and minerals that are essential to skin health.

Jojoba Oil – A perfect choice for skin care because it naturally resembles sebum, the oily substance naturally produced by the body to nourish and protect skin. You can mix jojoba oil into shea butter for a natural lotion.

References:

  1. https://wellnessmama.com/61770/petroleum-jelly/
  2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petroleum_jelly
  3. www.livestrong.com/article/226763-side-effects-of-petrolatum/
  4. www.safecosmetics.org/get-the-facts/chemicals-of-concern/petrolatum/
  5. http://www.besthealthmag.ca/best-looks/skin/the-truth-about-petrolatum/
  6. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/21/vaseline-petroleum-jelly_n_4136226.html
  7. https://www.healthline.com/health/beauty-skin-care/petroleum-jelly
  8. https://beautyeditor.ca/2014/10/16/petroleum-mineral-oil-skin-products
  9. http://www.berkeleywellness.com/self-care/over-counter-products/article/petroleum-jelly-safe
  10. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/019096229270060S
  11. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S092318111200031X
  12. https://www.jacionline.org/article/S0091-6749(15)01194-X/fulltext
  13. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4885180/
  14. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6477564/
  15. https://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0365-05962018000200238
  16. http://www.safecosmetics.org/get-the-facts/chemicals-of-concern/petrolatum/
  17. https://jpet.aspetjournals.org/content/78/1/65
  18. https://www.aad.org/news/petroleum-jelly-for-skin-care
  19. https://davidsuzuki.org/queen-of-green/dirty-dozen-petrolatum/
  20. https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fphar.2020.00785/full
  21. https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamadermatology/fullarticle/519971
  22. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00032719.2016.1153647?scroll=top&needAccess=true
  23. https://www.berkeleywellness.com/self-care/over-counter-products/article/petroleum-jelly-safe

Sweet Orange

Sweet Orange (Citrus sinensis & aurantium var dulce)

Sweet orange is a fruit. The peel and juice are used to make medicine. The peel of sweet orange is used to increase appetite; reduce phlegm; and treat coughs, colds, intestinal gas (flatulence), acid indigestion (dyspepsia), and cancerous breast sores. It is also used as a tonic. Sweet orange juice is used for treating kidney stones (nephrolithiasis) and high cholesterol; and preventing high blood pressure and stroke, as well as prostate cancer.

The fruit and rind contain large amounts of vitamin C. Some researchers believe it might help asthma because of the antioxidant activity of vitamin C. It provides large amounts of potassium. There is evidence that potassium may help prevent high blood pressure and stroke. The fruit and juice are used to prevent kidney stones because they contain large amounts of a compound called citrate. Citrate tends to bind with calcium before it can form kidney stones.

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You will find Sweet Orange essential oil in Mother Jai’s Moisturizing Hand Sanitizer and Sanitizing Spray. Shop for yours below.

Known Benefits of Sweet Orange

Antimicrobial. Compounds found within the sweet orange peel have shown to be highly resistant to infection. Not only protecting the fruit from invasion but also when used internally or externally the compounds provide the same physical benefits to humans and animals, especially dogs and cats.

Antidepressant. Sweet Orange is commonly known for its wonderful uplifting and calming scent. When diffused, it can help with nervous tension, sadness, and can also improve the aroma of a stale room. It can also help support normal function of the immune system.

High cholesterol. Drinking sweet orange juice seems to help improve cholesterol levels. In large amounts (750 mL, or about three 8-oz glasses, per day for four weeks), sweet orange juice seems to increase “good” high-density lipoprotein and reduce the ratio of “bad” low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to HDL cholesterol in people with high cholesterol.

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High blood pressure. Drinking sweet orange juice seems to help lower the risk of high blood pressure. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) allows makers of sweet orange products that provide at least 350 mg of potassium per serving and are low in sodium, saturated fat, and cholesterol to make label claims that their product might reduce the risk of developing high blood pressure.

Stroke. Drinking sweet orange juice seems to help lower the risk of stroke. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) allows makers of sweet orange products that provide at least 350 mg of potassium per serving and are low in sodium, saturated fat, and cholesterol to make label claims that their product might reduce the risk of stroke.

Historical Uses of Sweet Orange

Asthma. There is some evidence that sweet orange and other fruits that are rich in vitamin C might improve lung function in people with asthma. But not all studies agree.

Common cold. Some research shows that drinking 180 mL (about 6 ounces) of sweet orange juice daily might help prevent symptoms of the common cold.

Depression. Early research suggests that using sweet orange on the skin during massage, or in the air as aromatherapy, reduces depression in older adults.

Insomnia. Early research shows that inhaling sweet orange as aromatherapy might help people who are going through hemodialysis to sleep better and feel less tired.

Kidney stones. Some research reports that drinking 400 mL of sweet orange juice (about 13 ounces) increases the amount of citrate in the urine. This might help to prevent kidney stones that are made of calcium.

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Obesity. Early research shows that drinking sweet orange juice does not reduce body weight in overweight adults. Other research shows that taking a specific product containing sweet orange, blood orange, and grapefruit extracts seems to decrease body weight and body fat in overweight people. But it is not clear if this is from the sweet orange or from the other ingredients.

Stress. Early research shows that smelling sweet orange essential oil during a stressful task might reduce anxiety and tension.

Using Sweet Orange as a Medicine

For high cholesterol: 750 mL sweet orange juice per day.

For high blood pressure and stroke prevention: Sweet orange juice products that provide at least 350 mg of potassium per serving and are low in sodium, saturated fat, and cholesterol are permitted by the FDA to make labeling claims that they might reduce the risk of developing high blood pressure and stroke.

Side Effects & Safety WebMD.com

When taken by mouth: Sweet orange juice and fruit is LIKELY SAFE for most adults when used in food amounts. It is POSSIBLY SAFE when used as a medicine.

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When inhaled: Sweet orange essential oil is POSSIBLY SAFE when used in aromatherapy.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Sweet orange is LIKELY SAFE when used in food amounts. There isn’t enough reliable information to know if sweet orange is safe to use as medicine when pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Children: In children, sweet orange juice or fruit is LIKELY SAFE when used in normal food amounts. But taking large amounts of sweet orange peel is LIKELY UNSAFE. It can cause colic, convulsions, or death.

Medication Interactions When Using Sweet Orange as a Medicine

Some medications are moved by pumps in cells. Sweet orange might change how these pumps work and decrease how much of some medications get absorbed by the body. This could make these medications less effective. To avoid this interaction, separate taking these medications from consuming sweet orange by at least 4 hours. Some of these medications that are moved by pumps in cells include bosentan (Tracleer), celiprolol (Celicard, others), etoposide (VePesid), fexofenadine (Allegra), fluoroquinolone antibiotics, glyburide (Micronase, Diabeta), irinotecan (Camptosar), methotrexate, paclitaxel (Taxol), saquinavir (Fortovase, Invirase), rifampin, statins, talinolol, torsemide (Demadex), troglitazone, and valsartan (Diovan).

Pravastatin (Pravachol)Interaction Rating: Major Do not take this combination. Drinking sweet orange juice might increase how much pravastatin (Pravachol) the body absorbs. Taking pravastatin (Pravachol) with sweet orange juice might increase drug levels in the body and possibly increase the chance of drug side effects.

Antibiotics (Quinolone antibiotics)Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Talk with your health provider. Calcium-fortified sweet orange juice can reduce the amount of some antibiotics the body absorbs. Reduced absorption of antibiotics can reduce their ability to fight infection. Sweet orange juice without calcium is unlikely to affect quinolone antibiotics. Some quinolone antibiotics include ciprofloxacin (Cipro), enoxacin (Penetrex), gatifloxacin (Tequin), levofloxacin (Levaquin), lomefloxacin (Maxaquin), moxifloxacin (Avelox), norfloxacin (Noroxin), ofloxacin (Floxin), and trovafloxacin (Trovan).

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Fexofenadine (Allegra)Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.Talk with your health provider. Sweet orange might decrease how much fexofenadine (Allegra) the body absorbs. Taking sweet orange along with fexofenadine (Allegra) might decrease the effectiveness of fexofenadine (Allegra). To avoid this interaction, separate taking this medication from consuming sweet orange by at least 4 hours.

References:

https://www.aromaweb.com/essential-oils/sweet-orange-oil.asp

https://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/o/oraswe12.html

https://idtools.org/id/citrus/citrusid/factsheet.php?name=Sweet+Oranges+%28Common%29

http://www.hflsolutions.com/lo/ingredients/AZ_2002_Preuss.pdf

https://www.medicinenet.com/sweet_orange/supplements-vitamins.htm

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jf990176o

https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/153537020422900802

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1319016417301421

https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/biochemistry-genetics-and-molecular-biology/sweet-orange

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0024320505009811

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0367326X99000933

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1023/A:1022899119374

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s002990050313

https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-908/sweet-orange

How to Cope with a Medical Condition that Causes Chronic Pain

Receiving a medical diagnosis can be difficult, especially if it’s a condition that will continue to cause chronic pain. While the news may be a shock, the best thing you can do is create a structured plan for yourself that includes relaxation techniques and a safe pain-management system.

Overcoming the shock

The initial shock can take time to wear off.

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  • It can be scary to learn about medical conditions, so be patient as you absorb the news.
  • Be sure to lean on your family and friends for emotional support to help you cope.
  • Stick to your routines to help ground you and take your mind off your diagnosis and pain.

Safely managing your symptoms

Learn healthy ways to cope with pain.

  • You can reduce inflammation through proper nutrition, so experiment with new recipes that can help ease your pain.
  • If you need help creating a healthy eating plan, hire a nutritionist who can help you get on the right path.
  • Start a meditation practice to help reduce pain intensity and increase clarity.
  • Incorporate exercise into your routine to help release natural endorphins and build muscle.

Coping with stress

Use natural methods to relieve tension.

  • Enjoy the natural aromas of essential oils by lighting a blended candle from Mother Jai.
  • Cut tension and relax at home by cleaning, decluttering, and opening your windows.
  • Practice yoga and meditation to relieve stiffness and improve blood flow.
  • Take up a new hobby to help occupy your mind and provide a distraction from worrying thoughts.

Find your community

You’re not alone: find others who are also dealing with a tough diagnosis.

  • To feel less alone in your diagnosis, find other people who share your condition.
  • There are many online resources for finding support groups, including Reddit and Facebook.
  • Support groups can help you work through the emotional and physical challenges of your condition and connect with people who can relate to what you’re going through.

While a medical condition can feel scary and unmanageable at first, following the above advice will help you cope—and thrive. Stick to a routine to stay grounded, take up meditation to reduce tension and pain, and find support groups that can help you through the challenges of your condition.

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Mother Jai offers wellness education, services, worksheets, and hygiene products to help you achieve the holistic wellness you desire. To learn more, call 720-336-1413 today!

Photo via Pexels

Oatmeal

Oats  (Avena sativa)

The oat (Avena sativa), sometimes called the common oat, is a species of cereal grain grown for its seed, which is known by the same name (usually in the plural). While oats are suitable for human consumption as oatmeal and oat milk, one of the most common uses is as livestock feed. Oats are commonly associated with lower blood cholesterol when consumed regularly.

Oats contain diverse essential nutrients. In a 100-gram (3.5-ounce) serving, oats provide 1,630 kilojoules (389 kilocalories) of food energy and are a rich source of protein, dietary fiber, several B vitamins and numerous dietary minerals, especially manganese. Oats are 66% carbohydrates, including 11% dietary fiber and 4% beta-glucans, 7% fat and 17% protein.

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You will find Powdered Oats in Mother Jai’s Mineral Milk Bath. Find yours below.

Here are 5 ways you can use oatmeal for your skin and beauty needs:

For Acne: A bowl of oatmeal may do wonders for your acne. Oatmeal contains zinc that is said to reduce inflammation and kill the acne-causing bacterial action. It also helps to soak up the excess oil from the skin that may trigger acne.

For Dry Skin: they can remove the dead skin cells and act as a natural moisturizer. Its anti-inflammatory properties help to keep the skin exfoliated. Oatmeal’s mild pH can help to cool down the inflamed skin due to rash or infection.

For Blackheads: it is full of chemical compounds called saponins, which are known for their natural cleansing activity. Black heads are nothing but clogged pores on your skin. Oatmeal helps to unclog the pores and gives you a smooth and clear skin.

Relieves Itching: Itching is mostly caused due to inflammation under the skin or when the skin’s pH level is out of balance. Oatmeal helps to normalize your skin’s pH levels, which helps to restore your skin’s natural pH and soften the dry skin. It also protects the skin from external irritants, by lending moisture to the skin. 

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Exfoliate: Now you know that oatmeal’s saponins have intense exfoliating properties. It helps in removal of the oldest dead skin cells on the skin’s outermost surface, and gives you a fresh, glowing and youthful skin. 

Preparing and Using Oats for Skin Care

Organic Steel Cut Oats are best for making your own colloidal oats.

  • ½ cup to 1 cup oats – ground or powdered until very fine. You can purchase oat flour.
  • Equal amount of boiling water
  • Mix well (careful it’s HOT!)
  • Allow to cool before using or mixing in anything else.

Next, mix in a few tablespoons of other ingredients for your personal use.

  • Tomato or orange juice for acidic removal of dead skin cells
  • Plain yogurt for dry and irritated skin.
  • Buttermilk for clarifying and lightening.
  • Sunflower oil for moisture and cleansing.
  • Coffee grounds for reducing wrinkles and brighten.
  • 10 drops of Geranium essential oil tones and plumps skin.
  • 10 drops of Tea tree essential oil kills bacteria and closes pores.
  • 10 drops of Rose otto (5% dilution) strengthens collagen and brings a rosy glow.
  • Always avoid your eyes when using essential oils.

Apply to your face in a thick layer.

  • Using upward circular motions
  • Allow to sit for 10-30 minutes
  • Rinse off with warm water
  • Gently pat dry
  • Apply moisturizer

Mother Jai’s Face Serum is a wonderfully light moisturizer blended from oils grown in America. Find yours below.

References:

https://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/eczema/colloidal-oatmeal-baths

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25607907

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https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23072529

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27272074

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28707186

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29895799

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22421643

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https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25285849

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30245775/

Nutmeg

Nutmeg (Myristica fragrans)

Nutmeg and mace are plant products. Nutmeg is the shelled, dried seed of the plant Myristica fragrans, and mace is the dried net-like covering of the shell of the seed. Nutmeg and mace are used to make medicine.

Nutmeg and mace are used for diarrhea, nausea, stomach spasms and pain, and intestinal gas. They are also used for treating cancer, kidney disease, and trouble sleeping (insomnia); increasing menstrual flow; causing a miscarriage; as a hallucinogen; and as a general tonic. Nutmeg and mace are applied to the skin to kill pain, especially pain caused by achy joints (rheumatism), mouth sores, and toothache.

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In manufacturing, nutmeg oil is used as a fragrance in soaps and cosmetics. Nutmeg oil is distilled from worm-eaten nutmeg seeds. The worms remove much of the starch and fat, leaving the portions of the seed that are rich in oil.

Steam distilled Nutmeg Essential Oil is a warming oil that when used judiciously, it is a wonderful essential oil for use in helping to ease digestive complaints as well as muscular aches and pains. A little goes a long way for all essential oils, but this especially holds true for Nutmeg Essential Oil. It primarily contains monoterpenes, but also contains approximately 10% ethers including myristicine and safrole as well as the phenol methyeugenol.

Aromatically, Nutmeg Essential Oil is a warm, spicy essential oil that is sweet and somewhat woody. It blends beautifully with other essential oils in the spice family. It also blends well with floral, citrus and wood essential oils. It can add a beautiful, distinctive spicy characteristic to otherwise bland blends.

Major Constituents of East Indian Nutmeg Oil:

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  • Sabinene
  • a-Pinene
  • B-Pinene
  • Myristicin
  • Terpinene-4-ol
  • Gamma-Terpinene
  • Linalool
  • (+)-Limonene
  • a-Phellandrene
  • a-Terpinene
  • Safrole
  • a-Thujene
  • Methyleugenol (reported for East Indian Nutmeg Oil)

Nutmeg Essential Oil Uses

  • Gastrointestinal Spasm
  • Nausea
  • Upset Stomach
  • Rheumatism
  • Arthritis
  • Muscular Aches and Pains
  • Muscular Injury
  • Menstrual Cramps
  • Nervousness
  • Tension

Source: Valerie Ann Worwood, The Complete Book of Essential Oils and Aromatherapy, 25th Anniversary Edition (Novato, CA: New World Library, 2016, 609.

Benefits of Nutmeg

Antibacterial. Test-tube studies show that nutmeg has antibacterial effects against potentially harmful bacteria, including E. coli and Streptococcus mutans.

Antioxidants. Nutmeg is rich in antioxidants, including phenolic compounds, essential oils, and plant pigments, all of which help prevent cellular damage and may protect against chronic diseases.

Anti-inflammatory. Nutmeg may reduce inflammation by inhibiting certain inflammatory enzymes.

Increase Libido. Some animal research suggests that high doses of nutmeg may enhance libido and sexual performance.

May benefit heart health. Animal studies show that taking high-dose nutmeg supplements reduced heart disease risk factors, such as high cholesterol and high triglyceride levels, though human research is lacking.

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Could boost mood. Rodent studies have found that nutmeg extract induced significant antidepressant effects in both mice and rats. Studies are needed to determine if nutmeg extract has the same effect in humans.

May improve blood sugar control. A study in rats showed that treatment with high-dose nutmeg extract significantly reduced blood sugar levels and enhanced pancreatic function.

Nutmeg has a warm, sweet flavor that pairs well with many different sweet and savory foods.

Nutmeg Essential Oil Safety Information

Nutmeg may cause serious side effects, such as hallucinations, rapid heartbeat, nausea, vomiting, and even death, when taken in large doses or combined with other recreational drugs.

Tisserand and Young warn that Nutmeg Essential Oil is potentially carcinogenic and can be psychotropic in high doses. They recommend a dermal maximum of 0.8% for East Indian and 5% for West Indian Nutmeg Oils. [Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young, Essential Oil Safety (Second Edition. United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier, 2014), 366-367.]

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References:

  1. https://www.aromaweb.com/essential-oils/nutmeg-oil.asp
  2. https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-788/nutmeg-and-mace
  3. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/nutmeg-benefits
  4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5222521/
  5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3920909/
  6. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5927356/
  7. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3891177/
  8. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29926690
  9. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26434127
  10. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22449521
  11. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23570003
  12. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK493173/
  13. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20816778
  14. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4848392/
  15. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26434127
  16. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1187868/
  17. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14567759
  18. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4151601/
  19. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3434417/
  20. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16233309
  21. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4502738/
  22. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16579733
  23. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4075663/
  24. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31063201
  25. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13181-013-0379-7#page-1
  26. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4057546/
  27. https://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/sis/search/a?dbs+hsdb:@term+@DOCNO+3516