Marjoram Leaf

Marjoram (Origanum majorana)

Marjoram (Origanum majorana) is a somewhat cold-sensitive perennial herb or undershrub with sweet pine and citrus flavors. In some Middle Eastern countries, marjoram is synonymous with oregano, and there the names sweet marjoram and knotted marjoram are used to distinguish it from other plants of the genus Origanum. It is also called pot marjoram, although this name is also used for other cultivated species of Origanum.

Find it in Mother Jai’s Cold & Flu Tea, shop below.

OTHER NAME(S): Essence de Marjolaine, Garden Marjoram, Gartenmajoran, Huile de Marjolaine, Knotted Marjoram, Maggiorana, Majoran, Majorana Aetheroleum Oil, Majorana Herb, Majorana hortensis, Majorana majorana, Marjolaine, Marjolaine des Jardins, Marjolaine Ordinaire, Marjolein, Marjoram Essential Oil, Marjoram Oil, Marubaka, Marwa, Mejorana, Mejram, Origan des Jardins, Origan Marjolaine, Origanum majorana, Sweet Marjoram.

It is commonly used for runny nose, coughs, colds, infections, and various digestion problems, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these or any other uses. In foods, marjoram herb and oil are used as flavorings. In manufacturing, the oil is used as a fragrance in soaps, cosmetics, lotions, and perfumes.

Don’t confuse it with winter marjoram or oregano (Origanum vulgare), which is also referred to as wild marjoram.

BENEFITS OF MARJORAM

Asthma. Early research shows that taking 2 drops of the essential oil daily along with asthma medication for 3 months might improve lung function in people with asthma better than taking asthma medication alone.

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Anti-Inflammatory Effects: When added to your food, it can help reduce your risk of developing inflammatory reactions. It can help with conditions such as asthma, fever, muscle aches, sinus headaches and migraines.

Improved Digestive Function: When used to make tea, this herb can help improve your digestion by improving your appetite and increasing the production of digestive enzymes that help break down food. In addition, marjoram tea can help alleviate common digestive disorders such as flatulence, constipation, diarrhea and stomach cramps.

Improved Heart Health: it can help improve your overall cardiovascular health by maintaining normal blood pressure levels, which lowers your risk of hypertension. It’s also known for helping reduce the buildup of cholesterol in your arteries, which can prevent heart disease.

Painful menstrual cramps (dysmenorrhea). Early research suggests that massaging a cream containing lavender, clary sage, and marjoram essential oils to the abdomen may reduce pain in some women with painful menstrual cramps. The effect of marjoram essential oil alone on menstrual cramps is unclear.

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Early research suggests that drinking the tea might improve some chemical markers of PCOS, but overall it does not seem to improve body weight, blood sugar, or levels of certain hormones in women with PCOS.

Protection Against Common Illnesses: it contains various compounds that have effective antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal properties. As such, it can help reduce your risk of diseases such as the common cold, measles, mumps, influenza, food poisoning and various staph infections.

Therapeutic Benefits: in its essential oil form, can help uplift your mood and improve your psychological well-being. It can be used to help relieve insomnia and reduce stress and anxiety.

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BENEFITS OF MARJORAM ESSENTIAL OIL

Collected by steam distillation of the fresh flowering tops. Marjoram oil happens to be popular among aromatherapy enthusiasts, and is known for providing a warm, spicy, woody and camphoraceous scent that can provide a vast array of benefits, such as:

Analgesic: Helps alleviate pain related to colds, fevers, inflammation and headache.

Antiseptic: Applying the essential oil on wounds can help prevent them from becoming infected and developing tetanus.

Antibacterial: Helps kill bacteria that may cause various skin and digestive infections.

Carminative: Can help solve digestive problems such as flatulence by relaxing the muscles in the abdominal region.

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Diuretic: Can help increase your frequency and quantity of urination, thereby helping improve your ability to eject excess water and harmful toxins from your body.

USES FOR MARJORAM LEAF

Marinades: Upgrade the taste of your marinated meat and fish dishes by adding it to the marinade.

Roasted meats: it can add an herbal aroma to roasted meats, such as chicken.

Sautéed vegetables: Side dishes such as sautéed vegetables become more flavorful with a dash of marjoram.

Soups: It gives vegetable soups more flavor.

Teas: in medicinal amounts for short periods of time to alleviate symptoms of cold and flu

DOSAGE

The typical oral dose of marjoram is one to two cups of the tea daily. Prepare the tea by steeping one to two teaspoons of the flower or leaf in one cup of boiling water for five minutes, and then strain. Marjoram can also be used as a poultice or mouthwash; consult with your physician for appropriate concentrations.

Child Dosage: Children should avoid it in amounts larger than those typically used in culinary applications.

SIDE EFFECTS & SAFETY

Marjoram is LIKELY SAFE in food amounts and POSSIBLY SAFE for most adults when taken by mouth in medicinal amounts for short periods of time.

It is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when used long-term. There is some concern that marjoram could harm the liver and kidneys or cause cancer if used long-term.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It is POSSIBLY UNSAFE to use marjoram in medicinal amounts if you are pregnant. It might start your period, and that could threaten the pregnancy. Not enough is known about the safety of using it in medicinal amounts if you are breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Children: Do not give marjoram to children in medicinal amounts. It is POSSIBLY UNSAFE for them.

Bleeding disorders: Taking medicinal amounts of marjoram might slow clotting and increase the chances of bruising and bleeding in people with bleeding disorders.

Allergy to basil, hyssop, lavender, mint, oregano, and sage: it can cause allergic reactions in people allergic to these plants and other members of the Lamiaceae family of plants.

Surgery: Taking medicinal amounts of marjoram might increase the risk of bleeding during and after surgery. Stop using marjoram medicinally at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Lithium interacts with MARJORAM: it might have an effect like a water pill or “diuretic.” Taking marjoram might decrease how well the body gets rid of lithium. This could increase how much lithium is in the body and result in serious side effects. Talk with your healthcare provider before using this product if you are taking lithium. Your lithium dose might need to be changed.

RECIPES

Spicy Roast Chicken With Tomatoes and Marjoram

Ingredients:

  • 24 ounces of cherry tomatoes (about 4 cups), stemmed
  • 1/4 cup of coconut oil
  • 5 garlic cloves, pressed
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons of dried crushed red pepper
  • 2 Tbsp. of chopped fresh marjoram
  • 4 pasture-raised chicken breast halves with ribs
  • Himalayan salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

Procedure:

  1. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. Toss the tomatoes, coconut oil, garlic, crushed red pepper and 1 tablespoon of marjoram in a large bowl.
  3. Place the chicken slices on a rimmed baking sheet.
  4. Pour the mixture over the chickens, while arranging the tomatoes in a single layer on a sheet around the chickens.
  5. Sprinkle the chicken slices generously with salt and pepper.
  6. Roast until the chicken slices are cooked through and the tomatoes are blistered, for about 35 minutes.
  7. Transfer the chickens to plates.
  8. Spoon the tomatoes and juices over.
  9. Sprinkle the plates with the remaining 1 tablespoon of marjoram and serve.

References:

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marjoram
  2. https://www.planttherapy.com/marjoram-sweet-essential-oil?v=256
  3. https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-563/marjoram
  4. https://www.ewg.org/skindeep/ingredient/721189/ORIGANUM_MAJORANA_%28SWEET_MARJORAM%29_LEAF_OIL/
  5. https://www.britannica.com/plant/marjoram
  6. https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/marjoram
  7. http://www.ejpmr.com/admin/assets/article_issue/1454479607.pdf
  8. https://articles.mercola.com/herbs-spices/marjoram.aspx
  9. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/292161091_Origanum_majorana_L_-Phyto-pharmacological_review
  10. https://plantvillage.psu.edu/topics/marjoram/infos
  11. http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/CropOp/en/herbs/culinary/orega.html
  12. https://www.oils4life.co.uk/5ml-Marjoram-ORGANICessential-oil-Sweet-Origanum-Majorana-Leaf-Oil
  13. https://www.aromaweb.com/essential-oils/marjoram-oil.asp
  14. https://www.drweil.com/vitamins-supplements-herbs/herbs/marjoram/
  15. http://www.lindbergnutrition.com/ns/DisplayMonograph.asp?StoreID=1c7a08050b8f4419bffba945004ca5d1&DocID=bottomline-marjoram
  16. https://gobotany.newenglandwild.org/species/origanum/majorana/
  17. http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFinderDetails.aspx?kempercode=d828
  18. https://scholar.google.com/scholar?q=Marjoram+leaf+(Origanum+majorana)&hl=en&as_sdt=0&as_vis=1&oi=scholart
  19. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30217790
  20. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30210537
  21. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30205180
  22. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30138756
  23. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29747749

Ginger Root

Fresh ginger

Ginger Root (Zingiber officinale)

Ginger (Zingiber officinale) is a flowering plant whose rhizome, ginger root or simply ginger, is widely used as a spice or a folk medicine. Ginger is in the family Zingiberaceae, to which also belong turmeric (Curcuma longa), cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum), and galangal. Ginger originated in the tropical rainforests from the Indian subcontinent to Southern Asia where ginger plants show considerable genetic variation. As one of the first spices exported from the Orient, ginger arrived in Europe during the spice trade, and was used by ancient Greeks and Romans. The distantly related dicots in the genus Asarum are commonly called wild ginger because of their similar taste.

Fresh ginger

Other Common Names: Jamaican ginger, Indian Ginger, gan-jiang, sheng-jiang, African ginger, black ginger, zingiber officinale.

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The English origin of the word, “ginger”, is from the mid-14th century, from Old English gingifer, from Medieval Latin gingiber, from Greek zingiberis, from Prakrit (Middle Indic) singabera, from Sanskrit srngaveram, from srngam “horn” and vera- “body”, from the shape of its root. The word probably was readopted in Middle English from Old French gingibre (modern French gingembre).

Ginger root and powder

Ginger Nutrition

Raw ginger is composed of 79% water, 18% carbohydrates, 2% protein, and 1% fat (table). In 100 grams (a standard amount used to compare with other foods), raw ginger supplies 80 Calories and contains moderate amounts of vitamin B6 (12% of the Daily Value, DV) and the dietary minerals, magnesium (12% DV) and manganese (11% DV), but otherwise is low in nutrient content. When used as a spice powder in a common serving amount of one US tablespoon (5 grams), ground dried ginger (9% water) provides negligible content of essential nutrients, with the exception of manganese (70% DV).

100 grams (about 3.5 ounces) of raw ginger contains approximately (3):

  • 80 calories
  • 17.8 grams carbohydrates
  • 1.8 grams protein
  • 0.7 grams fat
  • 2 grams dietary fiber
  • 415 milligrams potassium (12 percent DV)
  • 0.2 milligrams copper (11 percent DV)
  • 0.2 milligrams manganese (11 percent DV)
  • 43 milligrams magnesium (11 percent DV)
  • 5 milligrams vitamin C (8 percent DV)
  • 0.2 milligrams vitamin B6 (8 percent DV)
  • 0.7 milligrams niacin (4 percent DV)
  • 34 milligrams phosphorus (3 percent DV)
  • 0.6 milligrams iron (3 percent DV)

In addition to the nutrients listed above, ginger also contains a small amount of calcium, zinc, pantothenic acid, riboflavin and thiamin. However, keep in mind that most people consume a very small portion of ginger, so it should be combined with a variety of other nutrient-dense foods to meet your micronutrient needs.

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Ginger tea

Benefits of Using Ginger Root

Ginger has been used for in cooking and traditional medicine for thousands of years. It is currently one of the most widely used herbs worldwide.

  • It has been used traditionally for a long time to treat nausea. Scientific evidence confirms its uses as an herbal remedy for nausea and related ailments such as morning sickness and motion sickness.
  • Several studies have found that ginger could help prevent the formation of stomach ulcers. In fact, one 2011 animal study showed that ginger powder protected against aspirin-induced stomach ulcers by decreasing levels of inflammatory proteins and blocking the activity of enzymes related to ulcer development.
  • Ginger contains many anti-fungal compounds which make it a popular herb for treating athlete’s foot. Fungal infections cause a wide variety of conditions, from yeast infections to jock itch and athlete’s foot. Fortunately, ginger has powerful anti-fungal properties that can safely and successfully help kill off disease-causing fungi.
  • The health benefits of ginger are largely due to its antioxidants, anti-inflammatory properties and content of therapeutic compounds like gingerol, shogaol, paradol and zingerone. Studies have shown that ginger root inhibits the production of cytokines, which promote inflammation. Therefore, the traditional Indian use for treating inflammation is gaining new-found popularity.
  • Some of the other traditional Asian uses for this herb include stimulating the appetite, promoting perspiration, and fighting body odor.
  • It has been used to treat pain and traditional Indian Ayurvedic medicinal uses include ginger root in herbal arthritis treatment. Treatment of joint pain, especially those conditions caused by poor circulation, is another popular use of this herb.
  • Heart health is another benefit of ginger use. It has been shown to slow the production of LDL and triglycerides in the liver and prevent the clotting and aggregation of platelets in the blood vessels, associated with atherosclerosis and blood clots.
  • One of the most impressive benefits of ginger is its anti-cancer properties, thanks to the presence of a powerful compound called 6-gingerol. Test-tube studies show that ginger and its components may be effective in blocking cancer cell growth and development for ovarian, pancreatic and prostate cancer. However, more research is needed to determine how the anti-cancer properties of ginger may translate to humans.
  • Unfortunately, adverse side effects like pain, period cramps and headaches are commonly associated with menstruation for many women. While some turn to over-the-counter medications to provide symptom relief, natural remedies like ginger can be just as useful at easing menstrual pain.
  • The root has also been used to treat some of the symptoms of common cold and flu such as loosening phlegm and treating chills. During cold weather, drinking ginger tea is good way to keep warm. It is diaphoretic, which means that it promotes sweating, working to warm the body from within. To make ginger tea at home, slice 20 to 40 grams (g) of fresh ginger and steep it in a cup of hot water. Adding a slice of lemon or a drop of honey adds flavor and additional benefits, including vitamin C and antibacterial properties.

Ginger for Your Skin and Hair (GingerParrot.co.uk)

Here are our favorite Ten Beauty Benefits of Ginger for Skin and Hair – they’re all reasons to eat ginger every day!

  1. Anti-ageing: Redheads are well-versed in the importance of wearing SPF to protect the skin from the sun, the biggest influence of the appearance of ageing. But eating ginger can also help fight wrinkles! The food is packed with the super-foodiness of anti-oxidants, which reduce toxins in skin cells while increasing blood circulation, helping to reduce the appearance of ageing.
  2. Blemishes and Acne: Not only is ginger great for anti-ageing, it can also help with spots and imperfections. Ginger contains powerful antiseptic and cleansing qualities, minimizing the rate of spot and acne formation by actively killing bacteria on the skin’s surface and deep inside the pores. And sensitive-skinned redheads will be pleased to know that ginger is the best natural acne-fighting solution, so it’s great for those with delicate skin.
  3. Soothes burns and blisters: Probably not wise to apply immediately after a new burn, but your skin has cooled, fresh ginger juice is said to soothe and heal blisters, burnt skin or sunburn.
  4. Radiant skin: As odd as it sounds, slices of ginger root applied to your face can help to give you a refreshing glow. We agree that it doesn’t sound too glamourous, so perhaps try it when you’re home alone.
  5. Skin toning: While cleaning, fighting blemishes and making your skin more radiant, ginger also gets to work on toning your skin. A face mask is an ideal method for this. Try mixing grated ginger with a natural mask mix (or store-bought); it’ll help to moisturize and soften the skin, leaving it supple and glowing.
  6. Hypopigmental (white) scars: If you have scarred areas that are slightly lighter in pigmentation than the rest of your skin, a piece of fresh ginger can help. For noticeable results, hold a sliver of fresh ginger on the white scar for 30-40 minutes. This should be done every day for at least a week, at which point you should start seeing the color come back to your skin.
  7. Reduces hair loss: Ginger root makes your ginger roots stronger! Thus reducing hair loss, something we obviously want to prevent – keep living the ginger dream!
  8. Stimulates hair growth: Not only does ginger reduce hair loss, but it increases blood circulation to the scalp, also making hair silky and shiny at the same time.
  9. Fights dandruff: Ginger contains natural antiseptic properties which help to fight dandruff issues.
  10. Split ends: With its anti-oxidants, ginger can seriously help to repair any split ends and dry hair problems. Mix some ginger oil with your shampoo and watch how its natural moisturizing powers help to fix any dryness.
Ginger and lemon tea

Therapeutic Dosages

Ginger is available in fresh or dried root, tablets, capsules, powder, tincture, and tea forms. Customary daily dosages are:

Fresh Ginger Root: 1/3 of an ounce of fresh ginger root daily. This can be taken in tea form or used in baking or other herbal uses. Take five to six thin slices of fresh ginger and steep it in hot water for thirty minutes to make a fresh ginger tea.

Dried Ginger Root: 150 to 300 milligrams of the dried root can be taken three times daily in capsule or powder form.

It may also be used to make tea. A teaspoonful of the dried powder may be added to a pint of hot water and steeped for 30 minutes to make the tea.

Tablets and capsules generally come in 150 mg to 500 mg doses.

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Ginger tea

Potential Side Effects of Using Ginger

Allergic reactions to ginger generally result in a rash. Although generally recognized as safe, ginger can cause heartburn and other side effects, particularly if taken in powdered form. Unchewed fresh ginger may result in intestinal blockage, and individuals who have had ulcers, inflammatory bowel disease, or blocked intestines may react badly to large quantities of fresh ginger. It can also adversely affect individuals with gallstones and may interfere with the effects of anticoagulants, such as warfarin or aspirin.

  • Pregnant women should be careful with ginger due to its potential to cause uterine contractions.
  • It has also been shown to interfere with the absorption of dietary iron and fat-soluble vitamins.
  • Stomach upset is a common side effect with larger doses. It may potentiate the effects of blood thinners, barbiturates, beta-blockers, insulin, and other diabetes medications.
  • Due to the blood thinning effect, it should not be used before surgery.
Ginger and lemon

Benefits Of Lemon Ginger Tea: health benefits of this unusual infusion!

Treats Nausea & Indigestion – Ginger has a very powerful active ingredient, named zingiber, which is able to eliminate bacterial pathogens that often attack the stomach and compromise digestive function. Ginger is also known to soothe nausea and eliminate vomiting while promoting more effective digestion and nutrient absorption. Lemon, on the other hand, is closely linked to reducing indigestion and heartburn!

Improves Cognitive Function – Lemon and ginger help in improving concentration and cognition. Fortunately, both of these ingredients are also excellent at soothing nerves and improving mood, which means clear thinking, while the antioxidant effects mean less oxidative stress and a lower chance of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

Skin Care – The high vitamin content of lemon and ginger, combined with their numerous antioxidants, make this infusion an excellent option for improving the skin health. You can drink this tea or even apply it topically to irritated patches of skin. Antioxidants help to reduce oxidative stress in the skin and promote the growth of new cells, while the antibacterial and antiviral nature of this beverage protects the skin from infections.

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Weight Loss – Ginger is well known to stimulate the metabolism and can also help to satiate feelings of hunger. Therefore, a glass of lemon ginger tea in the morning can help those who are trying to lose weight, primarily by adding extra calorie-burning to their day and suppressing the desire to snack between meals.

Hair Care – Lemon and ginger have both been used independently for hair health for centuries, but this tea is high in vitamin A and C, both of which are linked to improve hair growth, and a reduce dry skin and dandruff. This can strengthen your hair and give it a luscious appearance.

Boosts Immunity – Both lemon and ginger are known around the world as immune system aids, so it makes sense that lemon ginger tea can comprehensively protect you from pathogens and illness. When you are suffering from a cold or flu, simply drink 1-2 cups of this tea each day and quickly see an improvement in your symptoms and a reduction in irritation of your respiratory tracts.

Controls Diabetes – When it comes to blood sugar regulation, few things are as effective as ginger. By optimizing the release of insulin and blood sugar in your body, you can prevent the dangerous spikes and drops in blood sugar that can lead to diabetes or can affect someone already diagnosed with this condition.

Relieves Pain – The natural anti-inflammatory nature of ginger not only reduces irritation, swelling, and inflammation in the body but can also function as an analgesic. This tea can help you recover from body pain, menstrual cramps, illness, and surgeries.

Improves Mood – Aside from this infusion’s effect on concentration and cognitive function, lemon and ginger are also known as mood boosters. There is a good reason why lemon is so commonly used in aromatherapy approaches, while ginger is known to relieve tension and lower stress hormone levels in the body, which can definitely make you feel happier and more in control of your emotions.

Side Effects Of Lemon Ginger Tea – Some people suffer from heartburn or stomach upset when they drink this beverage, which could be the response of a sensitive stomach to ginger’s powerful active ingredients or even a ginger allergy. Speak to your doctor or allergist before making any major changes to your diet or health regimen.

References:

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ginger
  2. https://www.herbal-supplement-resource.com/ginger-root.html
  3. http://nccih.nih.gov/health/ginger/
  4. http://powo.science.kew.org/taxon/urn:lsid:ipni.org:names:798372-1
  5. http://bja.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/84/3/367
  6. https://draxe.com/10-medicinal-ginger-health-benefits/
  7. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21753209
  8. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16117605
  9. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/star.19820340203
  10. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09712119.2011.558612
  11. https://journals.humankinetics.com/doi/abs/10.1123/ijatt.2014-0142
  12. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/228476601_Chemical_composition_and_antioxidant_properties_of_ginger_root_Zingiber_officinale
  13. http://www.academicjournals.org/article/article1380710823_Shirin%20and%20Jamuna.pdf
  14. http://www.jafs.com.pl/Effects-of-dose-and-adaptation-time-of-ginger-root-Zingiber-officinale-on-rumen-fermentation,66200,0,2.html
  15. https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/herbs-and-spices/ginger.html
  16. https://www.sigmaaldrich.com/life-science/nutrition-research/learning-center/plant-profiler/zingiber-officinale.html
  17. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/265990.php
  18. https://wellnessmama.com/7958/ginger-root/
  19. https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-961/ginger
  20. https://gingerparrot.co.uk/ten-beauty-benefits-of-ginger-for-your-hair-and-skin/
  21. https://www.livestrong.com/article/73965-cleanse-face-skin-ginger/

Eucalyptus

Eucalyptus leaf & oil (Eucalyptus globulus)

Eucalyptus globulus, the Tasmanian bluegum, southern blue-gum or blue gum, is an evergreen tree, one of the most widely cultivated trees native to Australia. They typically grow from 30–55 m (98–180 ft) tall. The tallest currently known specimen in Tasmania is 90.7 m (298 ft) tall. There are historical claims of even taller trees, the tallest being 101 m (331 ft). The natural distribution of the species includes Tasmania and southern Victoria (particularly the Otway Ranges and southern Gippsland). There are also isolated occurrences on King Island and Flinders Island in Bass Strait and on the summit of the You Yangs near Geelong. There are naturalised non-native occurrences in Spain and Portugal, and other parts of southern Europe incl. Cyprus, southern Africa, New Zealand, western United States (California), Hawaii, Macaronesia, and the Caucasus (Western Georgia).

Mother Jai blends a wonderful Cold & Flu Tea with eucalyptus globulus leaves.

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Other Names: Blue Gum, Blue Mallee, Blue Mallee Oil, Eucalipto, Eucalypti Folium, Eucalyptol, Eucalyptol Oil, Eucalyptus blatter, Eucalyptus bicostata, Eucalyptus Essential Oil, Eucalyptus Oil, Eucalyptus fructicetorum, Eucalyptus globulus, Eucalyptus Leaf, Eucalyptus odorata, Eucalyptus Oil, Eucalyptus polybractea, Eucalyptus smithii, Fever Tree, Fieberbaumblatter, Gully Gum, Gully Gum Oil, Gum Tree, Huile Essentielle d’Eucalyptus, Huile d’Eucalyptol, Huile d’Eucalyptus, Red Gum, Stringy Bark Tree, Sugandhapatra, Tailapatra, Tasmanian Blue Gum.

Eucalyptus globulus

History of Eucalyptus

The first to use eucalyptus tea to bring down a fever were the aboriginal people of Australia. This plant was only introduced to the rest of the world in the 18th century by a botanist on the Cook voyages to the Australian continent.

Eucalyptus was quickly adopted by traditional Chinese and Ayurveda medicines and, in the 19th century, it began being planted in Europe. By the beginning of the 20th century large plantations of eucalyptus would be found in many countries.

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The rapid growth of these trees helped not only to reforest vast areas of land but feed into the growing industries from pulpwood and charcoal to hygiene and cosmetics. In swamp areas the eucalyptus trees helped to drain the soil and reduce cases of malaria.

Uses for Eucalyptus Today

Eucalyptus leaves are still appreciated for their value in teas, inhalations and even for making cough candy. The nectar produced by lovely eucalyptus flowers is made into high quality honey.

As potpourris or stored inside a drawer, leaves are used to scent both clothes and home. You will find many products using eucalyptus oil for its refreshing and antiseptic properties, such as detergents, mouthwash, toothpaste and much more.

Eucalyptus radiata

BENEFITS OF EUCALYPTUS

The therapeutic benefits of Eucalyptus Globulus and Eucalyptus Radiata are quite similar. Both oils are high in 1,8- cineole, with varying monoterpenes. For example, Eucalyptus Globulus is high in 1,8- cineole, with significant amounts limonene, whereas Eucalyptus Radiata is high in 1,8- cineole with significant amounts of terpineol. These constituents lend our Eucalyptus oils to being excellent at supporting respiratory issues. The 1,8- cineole leads Eucalyptus oil to act as an astringent, and an aid to oily skin and acne.

Benefits of Eucalyptus Tea

Eucalyptus leaves are rich in limonene, which is antiviral, eucalyptol, and pinene, which is antiseptic. Apart from the volatile oils, this tea also contains flavonoids and tannins. These elements account for some of the main benefits of this herbal tea.

Treat Respiratory Problems: The most important of all eucalyptus tea benefits is its ability to help speed up the treatment of cold, flus and sore throats. Its antibacterial properties may help treat the cause of your respiratory ailments.

  • Taking this tea may also help to break a fever, bringing high body temperature down. You may even use eucalyptus leaves to create an air purifier, helping to clear the room of microbes.
  • As an expectorant, this tea may help by relieving irritation and disinfecting the respiratory tract. Eucalyptus herbal tea may help to expel phlegm and mucus that is causing chest congestion and making it difficult for you to breathe.
  • This herbal tea may treat all sorts of respiratory ailments such as laryngitis, bronchitis, emphysema and other infections. Gargling with it may even help to heal and calm a bad cough, treating an inflamed sore throat.
  • It also helps with other breathing problems such as allergies, asthma, rhinitis and sinusitis. You may even try using eucalyptus tea to try to reduce snoring. It is worth a try.

Blood Sugar Regulator: Drinking eucalyptus may help to lower blood sugar levels and stimulate the production of insulin. This may help prevent the onset of diabetes. If you already have diabetes then you should speak to your doctor before drinking this tea. A cup of this herbal tea may also improve blood circulation, relieving blood pressure and thus possibly preventing heart disease and other health problems.

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Digestive Aid: Eucalyptus tea may be used to improve your digestion by clearing away any bacteria or parasites that may be causing you digestive problems. This herbal tea may be used as a cleansing agent, clearing your intestines of toxins and harmful agents.

It is a refreshing and cooling tea that may begin helping you the moment you take your first sip, as it helps to treat mouth infections, gum disease and even preventing cavities and plaque. It is a great remedy to try when you have mouth sores or just simply bad breath that could have been caused by bacteria.

Infection Fighter: Eucalyptus tea may be used to treat an illness, but it may also be used to prevent the occurrence of future ailments. A cup of this tea may help to give your immune system a boost reducing the chances of you getting sick.

  • Drink daily to help clear up acne, as this is a minor bacterial infection that may be fought using this antibacterial herbal tea. Eucalyptus is said to help detoxify the liver and cleanse the kidneys, resulting in healthier and fresher skin.
  • A cup of eucalyptus tea may be what you need when you have bladder or urinary problems. It is said to help not only treat bladder disease but also clear away infections in the urinary tract. This antiseptic tea may also help fight cystitis.
  • This herbal tea may be able to treat other infections, such as strep throat, E. coli, or yeast infections.

External Uses: Make a cooled eucalyptus infusion to use as a topical treatment for skin infections or inflammation. Use this herbal tea to clear away bacteria or microbes that are causing your problems.

  • As a compress this herbal infusion may be used to help scar wounds and begin the healing process. It may be used on cuts, burns and other wounds that you need help cleaning.
  • When applied topically this tea is also said to make your skin look healthier and feel fresher. You may resort to this tea when you need to get rid of lice or just simply repel insects.
  • You may find relief from muscle pains or joint stiffness by using a warm compress made with eucalyptus tea. This may also apply when the ache is caused by rheumatism or arthritis. The herbal infusion may clear away the inflammation and soothe the area.
  • Tip: Try soaking in a bath infused with eucalyptus tea when your body is aching.

Eucalyptus essential oil is well-loved in the field of aromatherapy. There are around 500 different species of eucalyptus essential oil produced around the world, but these four are the most commonly used:

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Eucalyptus globulus: This species is the top choice for creating eucalyptus essential oil, and is the ingredient used for various eucalyptus products as well.

Eucalyptus polybractea: Also known as “Blue Mallee,” it is high in cineole, which is a colorless liquid terpene with an odor similar to camphor.

Eucalyptus radiata: Also known as “narrow-leaved peppermint,” it is known for its refreshing aroma.

Eucalyptus citriodora: Nicknamed the “lemon-scented gum,” it is primarily used in perfume and industrial purposes.

CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=129596

Benefits and Uses of Eucalyptus Essential Oil

Colds and Flu: Basically, Eucalyptus can cleanse the body of micro-organisms and harmful toxins that make you feel unwell. One of the best ways to use eucalyptus oil is to add the essential oil to a diffuser and leave this on all night. You sleep sound as the healing benefits of eucalyptus works its magic. If your cold/flu is more severe then add between 5 to 10 drops of eucalyptus essential oil to a bowl of boiling water, cover your head with a towel and inhale for 5 minutes. This should certainly clear your breathing.

Alleviating Pain: Eucalyptus essential oil has been scientifically proven to be particularly effective in alleviating pain, especially joint and muscle pain when topically applied. This is due to the beneficial herbal remedy’s potent compounds with incredibly powerful analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties. Topical application of eucalyptus oil on the affected area is recommended to offer an almost immediate relief for arthritis, stiff muscles, fibrosis, nerve pain, ache, rheumatism, sprained tendons and ligaments, and lumbago among other types of body pains. Massaging the potent eucalyptus oil on the affected area in a circular motion is considered to be an even more effective treatment strategy.

Repelling Insects: You can now easily do away with irritating pests and insects thanks to the natural herbal remedy’s distinct smell that drives them off. The natural remedy is a potent natural insect repellant that can be used to effectively scare harmful and irritating pests. You can either use the eucalyptus essential oil as a mist in a vaporizer or mix it with your favorite skin care cosmetic cream before topically applying it on your body. This essential oil is mostly used as an effective natural insect repellant by individuals who are allergic to pharmaceutical aerosol products created for the same purpose.

Promoting Good Dental Health: Eucalyptus essential oil is a common natural ingredient used in various toothpaste and mouthwash dental products. This is mainly because of the herbal remedies increasingly potent germicidal and antibacterial properties that are combined with its minty yet quite camphoraceous taste. Apart from playing a major role in improving oral breath, the eucalyptus natural herbal remedy can also be used to treat a wide variety of dental disorders, fight tooth decay, alleviate toothaches and treat both cavities and dental plaque. All these beneficial properties make the essential eucalyptus oil a must-go-to drug for various if not all dental-related issues.

Boosting the Immune System: Various scientific studies show that eucalyptus oil contains potent natural properties and compounds that can be used to enhance the immune system. For instance, when topically applied to the human skin, the essential oil can easily strengthen and stimulate immune cells, thus providing a super protective barrier against common infections.

Macrophages are unique types of body cells that whose main role is to fight and kill infections. Apart from that, the published scientific study also revealed that the natural herbal remedy actively helped the body to strengthen its protective mechanism (immune system) even further.

Treating Respiratory Issues: Eucalyptus essential oil has been scientifically proven to be quite effective in treating a wide range of respiratory issues, especially coughs and colds. The herbal remedy can also be used to offer relief against various sinusitis, asthma and bronchitis symptoms.

Eucalyptus leaves contain potent expectorant compounds that help in removing excess mucus and phlegm from the respiratory tract and sinuses thus actively eliminating thus threatening the existence of pathogens like bacteria that thrive in such environments. The natural herbal remedy’s vasodilating, soothing and anti-inflammatory properties are particularly effective for treating multiple asthma symptoms. All these eucalyptus benefits for breathing are crucial for maintaining a healthy respiratory system.

Alleviating Fever: The eucalyptus plant is often referred to as the “fever” tree due to its amazing ability to reduce body temperature and manage fever. A more effective natural herbal fever remedy can be produced by combining the eucalyptus essential oil with peppermint oil and then spraying it on the sick person’s body. You can also dilute the potent mixture with either water or olive oil when using it on a patient with a sensitive skin.

Diabetes Management: The natural herbal remedy can be used to manage and even prevent diabetes. There are various scientific studies that are still being carried out to explain the eucalyptus essential oil’s significant role in lowering blood sugar levels. Various research findings also indicate that the eucalyptus tree’s leaves can be brewed into a highly potent herbal tea that can be used to prevent and even treat diabetes. Drinking particularly one to two cups of the herbal infusion daily is highly recommended.

It is important to consult your doctor or licensed health practitioner before consuming the herbal remedy or any other natural remedy for that matter to manage your diabetes condition. This is because the essential oil’s blood sugar lowering effect might be dangerous depending on your current diabetes condition. Eucalyptus oil’s vasodilating properties can also lead to an increase in overall blood circulation, which is a major diabetes symptom.

Treating Anxiety, Stress, Depression, and Fatigue: This essential health benefit is attributed to the natural herbal remedy’s potent soothing and sedative effects. Eucalyptus tea is a natural remedy commonly recommended, especially for individuals suffering from chronic stress and anxiety. Apart from that, the herbal remedy’s vasodilation and stimulant properties help to relax blood vessels thus increasing blood flow.

By increasing blood flow to the brain, the herbal remedy actively rejuvenates the entire body system, thus; promoting active behavior. Mental exhaustion can also be alleviated by consuming the eucalyptus natural herbal remedy. You are likely to become slightly sluggish when suffering from any major or minor medical condition. However, you can solve this issue simply by consuming the natural herbal remedy.

Eucalyptus Benefits for Skin: According to the “University of Maryland Medical Centre,” the eucalyptus essential oil has been used to reduce inflammation, treat various skin infections and heal wounds for centuries now. Cineole, citronellal, and citronellol are the main compounds that provide the herbal remedy with its potent antibacterial compounds that are beneficial to the skin.

Eucalyptus oil also contains antiseptic and antimicrobial properties that are particularly effective for treating sores, wounds, burns, abrasions, scrapes and cuts. The herbal remedy can also be made into a healing ointment or salve for treating insect bites and stings.

Wound Treatment: Eucalyptus oil has antimicrobial and antiseptic properties that are effective at treating wounds, burns, cuts, abrasions, sores and scrapes. It also can be made into a salve or healing ointment and put on bug bites and stings. Along with acting as a natural pain reliever to the area, it also keeps the area from getting infected, which speeds healing.

Odor Remover: Whether you’re battling smelly shoes or a stinky dog bed, topically wash items to remove odors with a wet rag soaked in eucalyptus oil-infused water, and place outside to dry in the sun. This can prevent odors as well as keep the shape intact! You may also mix it with lemon oil or tea tree oil for an anti-stink spray.

Air Cleanser: Try putting a few drops into your vacuum and clothes dryer filters to freshen them up and sanitize them a little. Also, it’s great for killing mold in your home, and you can mix eucalyptus with other oils like clove and tea tree oil to cleanse the air and maintain a mold-free home.

Spot Remover: Like lemon essential oil, eucalyptus oil is highly effective at removing spots on your carpet, clothes and basically every fabric you have in the house. It even works to get gum off your shoes! Make sure to “test” it on an inconspicuous place first just to make sure the oil doesn’t react strangely with the material you treat. You just don’t know what’s in the synthetic materials nowadays!

Eucalyptus Side Effects: Eucalyptus essential oil in its original state is extremely potent and can be actually poisonous when undiluted, especially for young children. It is important that you consume the herbal remedy in small quantities as it can be toxic when overused. The herbal remedy has also been reported to cause airborne contact dermatitis in individuals with certain levels of allergic sensitivities. Eucalyptus essential oil is also known to interfere with certain homeopathic remedies, hence; it will be wise for you to consult a licensed herbalist before deciding to use it.

By Arnaud Gaillard (arnaud () amarys.com) – Self. Photo de l’auteur., CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2411

Recipes with Eucalyptus

Eucalyptus Tea Recipe for Asthma and Bronchitis

Ingredients:

  • 1.5 ounces of dried eucalyptus leaves
  • 1 ounce of dried coltsfoot leaves
  • 1 ounce of dried thyme leaves
  • 1 cup of water

Procedure:

  • Mix all herbs together, and pour 1 teaspoon of the mixture into a cup of boiling water.
  • Cover and steep for 10 minutes, then strain. Serve and enjoy.

Eucalyptus Tea Recipe for Acne

Ingredients:

  • 1 ounce of dried eucalyptus leaves
  • 1 ounce of dried dandelion roots and leaves
  • 0.75 ounces of dried licorice root
  • 1 cup of water
  • 0.75 ounces of fennel seeds

Procedure

  • Mix all herbs together and pour 1 teaspoon of the mixture into a cup of boiling water.
  • Cover and steep for 10 minutes, then strain. Serve and enjoy.
  • Alternatively, you can use the tea as a facial wash. Simply let the tea cool to a comfortable temperature first before applying to your skin.

Eucalyptus Tea Recipe for Head Colds

Ingredients:

  • 0.5 ounces of dried eucalyptus leaves
  • 0.5 ounces of dried chamomile flowers
  • 1 ounce of dried peppermint leaves
  • 1 cup of water
  • Raw, organic honey to taste

Procedure:

  • Mix all herbs together, and pour 1 teaspoon of the mixture into a cup of boiling water.
  • Add honey to taste. Serve and enjoy.

Making Infused Eucalyptus Oil: The great thing about eucalyptus oil is that you can make it in your own home, especially if you have leftovers from making tea. Below are a few things you need to make infused eucalyptus oil:

Ingredients:

  • Kitchen weighing scale
  • 2 ounces of eucalyptus leaves
  • Olive oil or a different carrier oil
  • Crock pot
  • Small-gauge mesh strainer
  • Airtight jar made of dark glass

Procedure:

  • Gently crush the eucalyptus leaves with your fist to release the oil. You may use more or less depending on the size of your crock pot.
  • Place the eucalyptus leaves in the crock pot.
  • Add 1 cup of olive oil for every 1/4 ounce of leaves in the crock pot.
  • Place the lid on the crock pot and turn it on at low heat. Let the mixture steep for 6 hours.
  • Strain the eucalyptus oil through the mesh strainer and into the jar.
  • Seal the jar and date it.
  • Store the eucalyptus oil in a cool, dry spot, where it will remain viable for 6 months. If needed longer, store the oil in the vegetable crisper drawer in your refrigerator, where it will last for about a year.

References:

  1. https://www.edensgarden.com/blogs/news/this-or-that-whats-the-difference-between-our-eucalyptus-essential-oils
  2. http://www.experience-essential-oils.com/uses-of-eucalyptus.html
  3. https://www.therighttea.com/eucalyptus-tea.html
  4. http://www.experience-essential-oils.com/uses-of-eucalyptus.html
  5. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eucalyptus_globulus
  6. https://www.herbs-for-health.com/eucalyptus-benefits/
  7. https://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-700-EUCALYPTUS.aspx
  8. https://articles.mercola.com/herbs-spices/eucalyptus.aspx
  9. https://woman.thenest.com/eucalyptus-tea-good-for-3699.html
  10. https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/herbs-and-spices/eucalyptus.html
  11. https://www.livestrong.com/article/505179-benefits-of-eucalyptus-tea/
  12. https://draxe.com/eucalyptus-oil-uses-benefits/