Lemon Oil

Lemon Peel Oil (Citrus limon)

Lemon, scientifically called Citrus limon, is a flowering plant that belongs to the Rutaceae family. Lemon plants are grown in many countries all over the world, although they are native to Asia and are believed to have been brought to Europe around 200 A.D. In America, English sailors would use lemons while on the sea to protect themselves from scurvy and conditions caused by bacterial infections.

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The essential oil comes from cold-pressing the peel and not the inner fruit. The peel is actually the most nutrient-dense portion of the lemon because of its fat soluble phytonutrients. Lemon essential oil is composed of many natural compounds, including terpenes, sesquiterpenes, aldehydes, alcohols, esters and sterols.

Lemons and lemon oil are popular because of their refreshing scent and invigorating, purifying and cleaning properties. Research shows that lemon oil contains powerful antioxidants and helps to reduce inflammation, fight bacteria and fungi, boost energy levels and ease digestion.

Major Constituents of Cold Pressed Lemon Peel: (+)-Limonene, B-Pinene, Gamma-Terpinene, a-Terpineol, a-Pinene, and Geranial

BENEFITS OF LEMON (OrganicFacts.net)

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The health benefits of this citrus oil include its ability to treat skin disorders, hair conditions, stress disorders, fever, infections, asthma, obesity, insomnia, stomach problems, and fatigue. All these benefits of lemon can be attributed to its stimulating, calming, carminative, anti-infection, astringent, detoxifying, antiseptic, disinfectant, sleep-inducing, and antifungal properties.

Antidepressant: uplifting and mood enhancing. It has been found to reduce anxiety and assist in relieving the physical symptoms of depression.

Antimicrobial: works as a natural antimicrobial agent because of two dominant compounds found in the oil, limonene and b-pinene. This makes lemon oil a powerful tool in cleaning and food protection.

Antitumoral: limonene, a major component of this essential oil, has anti-tumor and chemotherapeutic effects. Oral feeding of lemon has resulted in significant regression of mammary carcinoma (a breast cancer), without any observable systemic toxicity.

Asthma: inhaling the essential oil has been proven to open airways and clear nasal passages and sinuses.

Cancer: A mixture of lemon combined with eucalyptus, melaleuca, lemongrass, clove leaf, and thyme, in a 40 percent ethanol base, demonstrated anti-tumorigenic effects when administered to patients with metastatic tumorigenic ulcers. Cancer patients have also found relief from pain, anxiety, nausea, and vomiting by using lemon and other essential oils.

Cleaning: used to cleanse your home of harmful pathogens, like bacteria, fungi and viruses. Using lemon as a natural cleaning product also keeps your home free of conventional products that are made with dangerous chemicals.

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Cold & Cough: has antibacterial, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, so it helps to boost your immune system and fight respiratory conditions.

Detoxification: has a purifying, cleansing and protective effect on the body. It helps to defend the body against harmful pathogens and promotes detoxification through the blood and liver. It also stimulates lymphatic drainage, which helps the body to cleanse itself of wastes and toxins.

Digestion: can help to soothe digestive problems, including issues like gastritis and constipation. It reduces gastritis symptoms by reducing the erosion of gastric mucosa (the lining of your stomach) and working as a gastro-protective agent against stomach lesions.

Nausea: can be used as a tool for reducing nausea and vomiting safely during pregnancy.

Oral Health: has antibacterial and antifungal properties, it works as a natural remedy for many oral conditions, including oral thrush and bad breath. It can also be used to whiten your teeth naturally and prevent tooth decay.

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Skin Care: benefits your skin by reducing acne, nourishing damaged skin and hydrating the skin. It is also effective against skin issues like blisters, insect bites, greasy and oily conditions, cuts, wounds, cellulite, rosacea, and viral infections of the skin like cold sores and warts.

Weight Loss: this essential oil contains d-limonene, which is known to help support your metabolism and cleanse your lymphatic glands, which can help with weight loss.

USES FOR LEMON ESSENTIAL OIL

Athlete’s foot, chilblains, colds, corns, dull skin, flu, oily skin, spots, varicose veins, warts. [Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 56-66.]

Detergent: Mix washing soda, purified water, vinegar, citric acid, and kosher salt with orange and/or lemon. Must be stored in the fridge. (See specific recipe below) Works for scrubbing dishes, in the dishwasher, and on hard surfaces. Cleaning your dishwasher is important at least once a month, run it empty with a cup of vinegar and baking soda.

Disinfectant & Degreaser: Add 40 drops of lemon and 20 drops of tea tree to a 16 ounce spray bottle fill with pure water (and a little bit of apple cider vinegar) for a traditional cleaning favorite. This natural cleaning product can be used to kill toxins and bacteria in your home, especially in places like your kitchen and bathroom.

Facewash: combine 2-3 drops lemon essential oil with baking soda and honey and scrub face and rinse with warm water.

Goo-Be-Gone: 3-5 drops of lemon will dissolve it, then you can wipe it off. Use it on your hands to remove grease and oil.

Sore Throat Relief: adding the essential oil to water and baking soda and gargling can relieve sore throat, reduce mouth inflammation and soothe tonsillitis.

Tooth Whitener: mix baking soda, coconut oil and lemon, rub on teeth after brushing and flossing, allow to sit at least 2min before rinsing.

Wood & Silver Polish: 10 drops of lemon essential oil on a cloth and polish silver and jewelry safely, or clean and nourish wood surfaces.

PRECAUTIONS

Lemon essential oil can cause photosensitivity when used topically, so it’s important to avoid direct sunlight up to 12 hours after using lemon oil on your skin.

It can cause skin irritations in some people, so do a patch test on your arm or leg before using it topically just to be sure that you won’t have an adverse reaction. When using lemon oil on my skin, I like to dilute it with a carrier oil, like coconut oil or jojoba oil, especially on sensitive areas like my face.

RECIPES

Homemade Dishwasher Detergent with Orange and Lemon

Total Time: About 10 minutes  Serves: About 30 ounces

INGREDIENTS:

2 ounces washing soda

3¼ cups purified water

4 ounces white vinegar

1 ounce citric acid powder

1 cup kosher salt

20 drops wild orange essential oil

20 drops lemon essential oil

DIRECTIONS:

Combine all ingredients until well blended.

Use about 1½–2 tablespoons of detergent per load.

Homemade Melaleuca Citrus Household Cleaner

Total Time: 2 minutes  Serves: 30-90

INGREDIENTS:

8 ounces water

4 ounces distilled white vinegar

15 drops melaleuca oil

15 drops lemon

Glass cleaning spray bottle

DIRECTIONS:

Fill spray bottle with ingredients.

Close bottle and shake to mix.

Swirl/shake bottle before each spray.

Homemade Dish Soap with Lemon and Lavender

Total Time: 10 minutes Serves: About 16 ounces

INGREDIENTS:

1 cup Castile soap

¼ cup soap flakes or grated Castile soap

4 tablespoons super washing soda

4 ounces purified water

30 drops lemon essential oil

30 drops lavender essential oil (optional, rosemary)

DIRECTIONS:

Place the soap flakes and washing soda into a bowl and blend with a whisk.

Bring the water to a boil, then pour on top of the ingredients. Stir.

Add the remaining ingredients.

Blend all ingredients well.

Allow to cool, stirring occasionally, then pour into a BPS-free squirt bottle or a glass bottle with a pump.

Homemade Face Wash

Total Time: 5 minutes Serves: 30

INGREDIENTS:

1 cup coconut oil

1 tbsp baking soda

5 drops lavender essential oil

5 drops frankincense essential oil

5 drops lemon essential oil

Glass Jar

(if acne prone, replace frankincense and lemon oils with 10 drops of tea tree essential oil)

DIRECTIONS:

Melt the coconut oil in a pan over low heat

Once melted, remove from heat and add in the remaining ingredients.

Store in wash dispenser or air tight jar and keep it in a cool place

References:

  1. https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/essential-oils/health-benefits-of-lemon-oil.html
  2. https://articles.mercola.com/herbal-oils/lemon-oil.aspx
  3. https://www.planttherapy.com/lemon-essential-oil-fresh-zesty-pure-citrus-scent-plant-therapy
  4. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lemon
  5. https://www.aromaweb.com/essential-oils/lemon-oil.asp
  6. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/6-lemon-health-benefits
  7. https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0153643
  8. https://lipidworld.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12944-017-0487-5
  9. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10942912.2017.1303709
  10. https://aip.scitation.org/doi/10.1063/1.4973164
  11. https://irjponline.com/admin/php/uploads/2498_pdf.pdf
  12. http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/real-benefits-lemon-water-according-science
  13. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6073409/
  14. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4005434/
  15. https://thetruthaboutcancer.com/lemon-essential-oil-cancer-fighter/
  16. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5543433/
  17. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24829772
  18. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/19410566/
  19. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10568210
  20. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5435909/
  21. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15778557
  22. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2581754/
  23. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27571876
  24. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25272759
  25. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4606594/
  26. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19109001
  27. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11314887
  28. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3671226/
  29. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5543433/
  30. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3824622/
  31. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5894780/

CBD DAILY FACIAL CLEANSER

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KEY BENEFITS

REFRESHING: Our lightweight formula will help to leave your skin refreshed

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PENETRATES: Penetrates deep into pores, while nourishing skin with natural extracts

SMOOTHS: Into skin to help restore hydration.

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Coconut Soap

Mother Jai’s Coconut Oil Soap

Home made and hand blended soap made of only Organic Coconut Oil, Distilled Water, and Sodium Hydroxide (yes, Lye). Mother Jai uses only silicon molds for this soap to prevent metal and releasing agent contamination. Silicon is inert and does not release any chemicals into products.

This is a ‘superfat’ blend. That means when the soap is made Mother Jai includes extra Coconut Oil to ensure all of the Lye reacts and to make the soap super moisturizing. This soap produces a wonderful fluffy foam that nourishes the skin and hair. Rub soap bar onto a loofa or wash cloth and scrub face and body.

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As a shampoo bar it leaves hair clean and soft without over drying. It also works great to preserve hair dye as it is not a ‘detergent’ like many commercial shampoos. Hair with bright colored hair dye do extremely well with this coconut oil soap. Simply rub the bar on wet hair until foam forms then massage through hair with fingertips. Don’t forget to massage your scalp to improve hair growth by stimulating follicles.

As a hand soap it leaves hands soft and sanitized without ‘antibacterial’ chemicals. You can use the bar whole or dissolve it for sanitary purposes. Simply break up the soap bar into smaller pieces and dissolve in distilled water. One 4oz bar to 20oz of Water in a jar. Allow it to dissolve completely and pour into soap pump. It is more ‘liquidy’ than commercial soaps because it lacks artificial fillers and stabilizers. This liquid soap works great on surfaces, dishes and clothes as well.

Organic Coconut Oil

Coconut oil soap is an excellent moisturizer for both the skin and the hair. The properties of the coconut oil also help remove dead skin cells and dirt away from the body. The oils also help prevent or reduce acne. It also helps firm up your skin helps you look younger as the soap is rich in antioxidants.

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Lauric, Capric, and Caprylic Acid – These fatty acids from the coconut are antimicrobial agents.  They help fight against nasty things like viruses, bacteria, fungi, and yeast.  Who needs anti-bacterial soap when you can just use coconut oil!

Micronutrients – Including calcium, potassium, magnesium, manganese, copper, zinc, iron, selenium, and vitamins C and E.  These micronutrients can pack a world of benefits from lowering blood pressure (manganese) to dandruff alleviation and prevention of skin aging (selenium).  

Antioxidants – Many of these micronutrients also act as anti-oxidants meaning that they block potentially harmful free radicals which can prevent disease and improve skin condition.

Distilled Water

Water that has been boiled into vapor and condensed back into liquid in a separate container. Impurities in the original water that do not boil below or near the boiling point of water remain in the original container. Thus, distilled water is one type of purified water. This means that distilled water is only H2O and all of the minerals, chemicals, bacteria and molds have been removed. This leaves a clean base for making clean soap.

Sodium Hydroxide (NaOH)

Is an inorganic compound with the formula NaOH. It is a white solid ionic compound consisting of sodium cations Na+ and hydroxide anions OH. Sodium hydroxide is a highly caustic base and alkali that decomposes proteins at ordinary ambient temperatures and may cause severe chemical burns. It is highly soluble in water, and readily absorbs moisture and carbon dioxide from the air.

This chemical is used to manufacture soaps, rayon, paper, explosives, dyestuffs, and petroleum products. It is also used in processing cotton fabric, laundering and bleaching, metal cleaning and processing, oxide coating, electroplating, and electrolytic extracting. It is commonly found in commercial drain/ oven cleaners. According to the the FDA, sodium hydroxide is considered a direct food recognized as safe, where it serves as a pH control agent and follows good manufacturing guidelines. Interestingly, sodium hydroxide has been studied for its use in the treatment of prion disease (as occurs in mad cow disease and kuru). The use of this compound has been shown to effectively reduce prion levels in an in vitro inactivation assay.

Sodium hydroxide is used in several food processing applications, such as curing foods like olives or helping to brown Bavarian-style pretzels, giving them their characteristic crunch. Sodium hydroxide is used to remove skins from tomatoes, potatoes and other fruits and vegetables for canning and also as an ingredient in food preservatives that help prevent mold and bacteria from growing in food.

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Get your home made superfat lye soap here.

Lye Soap

Soap is the result of a chemical reaction called saponification that occurs between lye and a type of molecule called a triglyceride (a fat or oil), where both substances are chemically transformed, creating soap and natural glycerin. Neither of the original ingredients exists anymore. All the lye – either sodium hydroxide for bar soap or potassium hydroxide for liquid soap – is consumed in the reaction.

So, while soap is made with lye, it doesn’t contain lye. Modern methods and measuring scales – as opposed to what was available to frontier women – allow soap-makers to use the proper mixture of oils and lye, ensuring that all lye is consumed. In addition, many soap-makers, including Mother Jai’s, add more oil than is required for the chemical reaction, further ensuring the neutralization of lye and adding to the soap’s moisturizing qualities. Including extra fats in the mixture is known as superfatting.

Still, some soap-makers make a point of positioning themselves as lye “alternatives,” insisting – for example – they use glycerin instead, or make their soap without the involvement of lye. In both these cases, misinformation seems to be a factor. Glycerin is a natural result of saponification. And the first step in creating bases for melt-and-pour soap-making – the most convenient home-based process? Saponification.

Understanding chemistry can go a long way toward informing public perceptions, including those of your customers. As negative as some perceptions of lye can be, all soap is made with lye – whether it’s bar or liquid – and soap made well can be great for your skin. The distinction between soap and commercial cleansers is especially clear with liquid soaps. Since most weren’t made with lye, what you’re buying isn’t soap, but a factory-made detergent for the skin. These are chemical emulsifiers usually derived from petroleum.

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The truth about lye in soap-making is simple: there is no true soap, as defined by the FDA, without lye. There’s also a huge difference between “made with lye” and “containing lye.”

Lye isn’t a villain, nor is soap made with lye something to avoid. In fact, in the hands of good soap-makers, it’s a product made with your skin and health in mind, and is far superior in overall quality and gentleness to commercial, non-soap cleansers. Lye is what you should be using.

Get your home made superfat lye soap here.

By Walkerma – Own work, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=5190866

Benefits Using of Lye Soap

Despite popular belief, lye soap is not harsh and it doesn’t burn skin. When farmers and homesteaders in the past made soap, they did not use correct proportions of lye and fats. They produced soap with residual lye in it. That soap burned skin. Unfortunately, the oldies ruined reputation of lye soap for us. Fortunately, modern homesteaders and soap makers have great resources available to them to make lye soap that is cleansing, soothing, conditioning, and pampering.

General Skin Care : Daily pampering with lye soap cleanses and conditions skin, gets rid of dry and itchy skin, rashes and irritations.

Acne Cure: Lye soap unclogs pores, reduces inflammation, and balances skin pH. Washing face with lye soap daily reduces acne and blackheads. It leaves skin silky and radiant.

Balancing Dry or Oily Skin: Lye soap fends both dry skin and oily skin. The way it works is very simple and ingenious.

  • Dry skin: Glycerin in the soap moisturizes dry skin. There is very little need or no need at all to use lotions any more.
  • Oily skin: This is the type of skin that has overactive oil (sebaceous) glands. When harsh soaps are used on oily skin, they make skin overly dry, but just for a short period of time. Oily skin reacts to dryness by producing extra lubricants by the oil glands. Such skin becomes oily almost immediately after washing.

Using lye soap on oily skin leaves the skin mildly moisturized by glycerin. Under these conditions, the oily skin doesn’t have to work overtime to produce oils any more. You must be patient though. This doesn’t happen overnight. You have to “train” your oily skin to slow down oil production by the hyperactive glands. It may take weeks to achieve noticeable results.

Seborrheic Dermatitis & Dandruff Treatment: Lye soap is used in the treatment of seborrhea and dandruff. Simply washing your hair and affected areas with lye soap reduces the flaky skin and irritation. Some lye soaps prescribed by dermatologists are medicated with aspirin, coal tar, zinc, or other additives.

Eczema, Psoriasis Relief: Because of the emollient qualities of lye soap, it is used by people with eczema and psoriasis to relief itching, irritation, and minimize the symptoms.

Sun Burn Treatment and Prevention: Using lye soap on the bare skin before going out in the sun minimizes sunburns. Lye soap helps cure inflamed skin if the sunburns already happened. Lather lye soap on the sunburned area and leave it overnight. Repeat until sunburn is gone. Lye soap speeds up the healing process.

Poison Ivy, Poison Oak, Poison Sumac Treatment: Washing the affected skin area with lye soap immediately after contact with the poisonous plants may help avoid the reaction altogether. If some time is passed after the contact, the reaction is very likely to happen. To minimize the reaction, wash the area with lye soap as soon as possible, and rinse with water. Repeat washing a few times. Lather lye soap on the affected skin and leave it on until the next wash. Skin reaction will disappear soon.

Insect Bites Cure and Insect Repellent: Washing the bites with lye soap reliefs itching and swelling almost immediately. Lather lye soap on your bare skin to repel mosquitoes. A bar of lye soap in your kitchen cabinets will keep ants in check.

Lye Soap Slows Down Skin Aging: Soothing, moisturizing, and antioxidant qualities of lye soap slows down formation of wrinkles and age spots when used daily.

Hunters’ Trick (can be a health benefit at times): Wash with unscented lye soap to become “invisible” when you go hunting. Lye soap removes human scent and animals become unaware of you presence. Happy hunting!

Get your home made superfat lye soap here.

Clove Bud

Clove Bud (Syzygium aromaticum)

You will find Clove Bud in Mother Jai’s Pain Relief Oils, Aroma Sprays, and Mouthwash

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Other Names: Bourgeon Floral de Clou de Girofle, Bouton Floral de Clou de Girofle, Caryophylli Flos, Caryophyllum, Caryophyllus aromaticus, Clavo de Olor, Clous de Girolfe, Clove Flower, Clove Flowerbud, Clove Leaf, Clove Oil, Clove Stem, Cloves

Botany: The clove plant grows in warm climates and is cultivated commercially in Tanzania, Sumatra, the Maluku (Molucca) Islands, and South America. The tall evergreen plant grows up to 20 m and has leathery leaves. The strongly aromatic clove spice is the dried flower bud; essential oils are obtained from the buds, stems, and leaves. The dark brown buds are 12 to 22 mm in length and have 4 projecting calyx lobes. The 4 petals above the lobes fold over to form a hood, which hides numerous stamens. Synonyms are Eugenia caryophyllata , Eugenia caryophyllus , and Caryophyllus aromaticus .

Oil properties: Clove oil has a warm, strong, spicy smell and the oil is colorless to pale yellow with a medium to watery viscosity. It blends well with Allspice, basil, bay, bergamot, chamomile, clary sage, geranium, ginger, grapefruit, jasmine, lavender, lemon, mandarin, palmarosa, rose, sandalwood, vanilla, ylang ylang

Origin of clove oil: A native of Indonesia and the Malacca Islands, it is an evergreen tree that grows to about 10 meters (30 feet) tall and has bright green leaves and nail-shaped rose-peach flower buds which turn, upon drying, a deep red brown. These are beaten from the tree and dried. The Latin word ‘Clavus’ means nail shaped, referring to the bud. It was often used by the Greeks, Roman and the Chinese, to ease toothache and as a breath sweetener, especially when talking to the Emperor. It has antiseptic properties and was used in the prevention of contagious diseases, such as the Plaque. It was an important commodity in the spice trade and is still used in perfumes, mulled wines and liqueurs, love potions, dental products and, stuck in an orange as pomade, an insect repellant.

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Extraction clove oil: Clove oil can be extracted from the leaves, stem and buds. We sell clove leaf oil, which is extracted by water distillation, containing the desired lower percentage of eugenol.

Chemical composition: The main chemical components of clove oil are eugenol, eugenol acetate, iso-eugenol and caryophyllene.

Scientific Facts About Clove: Clove is the dried bud of the flower from the tree Syzygium aromaticum. It belongs to the plant family named Myrtaceae. The plant is an evergreen plant growing in tropical and subtropical conditions. Clove is an herb and people use various parts of the plant, including the dried bud, stems, and leaves to make medicine. Clove oil is also famous for its medicinal properties. Clove has been used for thousands of years in India and China not only as a spice and condiment but also as a medicine for many ailments. Ayurvedic medicating used cloves for tooth decay, halitosis, and bad breath. In Chinese medicine, clove was considered to possess aphrodisiac properties.

Cloves Nutrition Facts: According to the National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, the nutrients found in 100 grams of cloves include 65 grams of carbohydrate, 6 grams of protein, 13 grams of total lipids, 2 grams of sugars, 274 kcal of energy and 33 grams of dietary fibers. Minerals in cloves include calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorous, potassium, sodium, and zinc. The vitamins found in them include vitamin C, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, folate, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, vitamin A, vitamin E, vitamin D, and vitamin K.

Precautions: Clove oil is a very potent oil and should be used with care. If it is used in a oil, lotion or cream applied to the skin, the concentration should be well below 1%. It may cause irritation to the skin of some individuals and can easily irritate the mucus membranes. It should be avoided during pregnancy.

Therapeutic properties: analgesic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, anti-neuralgic, carminative, anti-infectious, disinfectant, insecticide, stimulant, stomachic, uterine and tonic.

Clove oil can be used for acne, bruises, burns and cuts, keeping infection at bay and as a pain reliever. It helps with toothache, mouth sores, rheumatism and arthritis. It is beneficial to the digestive system, effective against vomiting, diarrhea, flatulence, spasms and parasites, as well as bad breath. Clove oil is valuable for relieving respiratory problems, like bronchitis, asthma and tuberculosis. The disinfecting property is useful in cases of infectious diseases. Placing a few drops of clove oil on a cotton ball and then placing the cotton ball in a linen cupboard will not only fragrance the cupboard, but will help to keep fish moths at bay.

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Burners and vaporizers: In vapor therapy, clove oil can be useful for bronchitis and dizziness and to help lift depression, while strengthening memory and fighting weakness and lethargy.

Massage oil: Clove oil can be used in a blended massage oil to assist with diarrhea, bronchitis, chills, colds, muscular numbness, spasms, rheumatism and arthritis. For toothache the outer jaw can be massaged with this oil. Use a low dilution of less than 1%.

In cream or lotion: When used in a cream or lotion, the positive effects of clove oil are the same as those of a massage oil and can furthermore help to sort out leg ulcers and skin sores. Use in low dilution of less than 1%.

Mouthwash: Clove oil can be included at a low rate as part of a mouthwash for toothache.

Health benefits of clove bud

Better Digestion: Cloves improve digestion by stimulating the secretion of digestive enzymes. Cloves are also good for reducing flatulence, gastric irritability, dyspepsia, and nausea. They can be roasted, powdered, and taken with honey for relief in digestive disorders.

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Antibacterial Properties: Cloves have been tested for their antibacterial properties against a number of human pathogens. The extracts of cloves were potent enough to kill those pathogens. Clove extracts are also effective against the specific bacteria that spread cholera.

Chemo-preventive Properties: Cloves are of interest to the medical community due to their chemo-preventive or anti-carcinogenic properties. Tests have shown that they are helpful in controlling lung cancer at its early stages.

Liver Protection: Cloves contain high amounts of antioxidants, which are ideal for protecting the organs from the effects of free radicals, especially the liver. Metabolism, in the long run, increases free radical production and lipid profile, while decreasing the antioxidants in the liver. Clove extracts are helpful in counteracting those effects with its hepatoprotective properties.

Diabetes Control: Cloves have been used in many traditional remedies for a number of diseases. One such disease is diabetes. In patients suffering from diabetes, the amount of insulin produced by the body is not sufficient or insulin is not produced at all. Studies have revealed that extracts from cloves imitate insulin in certain ways and help in controlling blood sugar levels.

Bone Preservation: The hydro-alcoholic extracts of cloves include phenolic compounds such as eugenol and its derivatives, such as flavones, isoflavones and flavonoids. These extracts have been particularly helpful in preserving bone density and the mineral content of bone, as well as increasing tensile strength of bones in case of osteoporosis.

Anti-mutagenic Properties: Mutagens are those chemicals that change the genetic makeup of the DNA by causing mutations. Biochemical compounds found in cloves, like phenylpropanoids, possess anti-mutagenic properties. These were administered on cells treated with mutagens and they were able to control the mutagenic effects to a significant rate.

Boosts the Immune System: Ayurveda describes certain plants to be effective in developing and protecting the immune system. One such plant is clove. The dried flower bud of clove contains compounds that help in improving the immune system by increasing the white blood cell count, thereby, improving delayed-type hypersensitivity.

Anti-inflammatory Properties: Cloves possess anti-inflammatory and pain-killing properties. Studies on clove extracts being administered in lab rats, suggest that the presence of eugenol reduced the inflammation caused by edema. It was also confirmed that eugenol has the ability to reduce pain by stimulating pain receptors.

Cure for Oral Diseases: Cloves can be taken for gum diseases like gingivitis and periodontitis. Clove bud extracts significantly control the growth of oral pathogens, which are responsible for various oral diseases. Cloves can also be used for toothaches due to their pain-killing properties.

Aphrodisiac Properties: Spices such as clove and nutmeg have been said to possess aphrodisiac properties, according to Unani medicine. Experiments on clove and nutmeg extracts were tested against standard drugs administered for that reason, and both clove and nutmeg showed positive results.

Cure for Headaches: Headaches can be reduced by using cloves. Make a paste of a few cloves and mix it with a dash of rock salt. Add this to a glass of milk. This mixture reduces headaches quickly and effectively.

Anal fissures. Early research suggests that applying a clove oil cream to anal fissures for 6 weeks improves healing compared to using stool softeners and applying lignocaine cream.

Dental plaque. Early research suggests that using a specific toothpaste (Sudantha, Link Natural Products Ltd.) containing a combination of clove, Acacia chundra Willd., malabar nut, bullet wood tree, black pepper, Indian beech, gall oak, Terminalia, and ginger twice daily for 12 weeks can reduce dental plaque, bleeding, and amount of bacteria in the mouth.

Mosquito repellent. Early research suggests that applying clove oil or clove oil gel to the skin can repel mosquitos for up to 5 hours.

Pain. Early research suggests that applying a gel containing ground cloves for 5 minutes before being stuck with a needle can reduce needle stick pain similarly to benzocaine.

Premature ejaculation. Research shows that applying a cream containing clove flower plus Panax ginseng root, Angelica root, Cistanches deserticola, Zanthoxyl species, Torlidis seed, Asiasari root, cinnamon bark, and toad venom (SS Cream) to the skin of the penis improves premature ejaculation.

Toothache. Clove oil and eugenol, one of the chemicals it contains, have long been used topically for toothache, but the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has reclassified eugenol, downgrading its effectiveness rating. The FDA now believes there is not enough evidence to rate eugenol as effective for toothache pain. “Dry socket” following tooth extraction.

Side Effects Of Using Clove

Clove Oil: Clove oils must not be used directly; instead they must be diluted either in olive oil or in distilled water. Clove extract oil is generally considered to be safe, but certain studies have revealed that they possess cytotoxic properties. There are two major components present in clove extract oil, eugenol, and B-caryophyllene. These compounds were particularly effective against fibroblasts and endothelial cells.

Clove Cigarettes: In Indonesia, cloves are consumed on a large scale in the form of cigarettes, popularly known as kreteks. These clove cigarettes have emerged as an alternative to tobacco cigarettes, but research shows that clove cigarettes are actually worse than conventional cigarettes. In the case of clove cigarettes, the amount of nicotine, carbon monoxide, and tar entering into the lungs was higher than that from normal tobacco cigarettes.

Note These Contraindications for the Use of Clove Oil

Keep in mind that the oil of cloves should be used moderately. Because of the high content of eugenol, excessive use may cause nausea, vomiting and blood problems. Other contraindications for this essential oil include the following:

• Phototoxicity. Do not use this oil before going out into direct sunlight, as it can lead to severe burns and other skin problems.

• Aspirin or anticoagulant medications. Clove bud oil can slow down platelet activity, which can interfere with these medications and cause adverse effects.

• Allergic reactions. Topically applying clove bud oil on damaged skin may cause severe allergic reactions and can further damage the skin.

Recipes

Clove and Cinnamon Tea

  • 1 1/2 cup water
  • 1 clove, crushed
  • 1 pinch cinnamon
  • 3/4 teaspoon tea leaves
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • 1 teaspoon raw milk, optional

Cooking Directions:

  • Boil water, cloves and cinnamon powder.
  • Cover the pot with a tight lid to retain flavors.
  • Boil for about two minutes.
  • Lower the heat and add the tea leaves.
  • Remove from heat and let stand for a few minutes or until it is drinkable.
  • Add the honey and milk. Serve.

World’s Greatest Vegetable Broth

  • 1 pound celery
  • 1 1/2 pound sweet onions
  • 1 pound carrots, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 pound tomatoes, cored
  • 1 pound green bell pepper, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1/2 pound turnips, cubed
  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 3 whole cloves
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 6 whole black peppercorns
  • 1 bunch fresh parsley, chopped
  • 1 gallon water

Cooking Directions:

  • Preheat oven to 450 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Remove leaves and tender inner parts of celery. Set aside.
  • Toss onions, carrots, tomatoes, bell peppers and turnips with coconut oil. Place vegetables in a roasting pan and place them in the oven. Stir the vegetable every 15 minutes. Cook until all of the vegetables have browned and the onions start to caramelize. This takes about an hour.
  • Put the browned vegetables, celery, garlic, cloves, bay leaf, peppercorns, parsley and water into a stock pot. Bring to a full boil. Reduce the heat to simmer. Cook uncovered until liquid is reduced in half.
  • Pour the broth through a colander, catching the broth in a large bowl or pot. The broth can be use immediately in other dishes or frozen for future use.

How to Make Infused Clove Oil

  • 4 fresh clove buds, crushed
  • Carrier oil, such as coconut oil
  • Strainer
  • Glass container with spout
  • Airtight bottleneck jar

Procedure:

  • Take the airtight jar and place the four crushed cloves at the bottom. Crush them thoroughly so that they can fit into the container.
  • Fill the jar with the carrier oil until the cloves are submerged, but not too much to overfill the container.
  • Seal the container tightly. Exposure to air can affect the oil’s potency.
  • Set aside the mixture for a week in an area where it can be exposed to sunlight.
  • Transfer the mixture into the glass container with a spout. Use the strainer to remove any sediment. Do not hesitate to strain the oil a couple of times to make sure particles are completely removed.
  • Dispose of the cloves from the strainer and do not reuse these cloves, as doing so can impact the effectiveness of the oil.
  • The strained mixture should be poured back into the airtight bottleneck container.
  • When storing, make sure the oil of is sealed tight. Shelf life can last from four to five years. Color may darken as time progresses.

Cleansing the body from parasites

– a mixture of linseed and cloves

Ingredients:

  • The linseed and the clove are effective with almost all types of parasites.
  • In order to prepare the mixture for cleansing, you need to take 10 parts of linseed and 1 part of dried cloves (100 grams of linseed and 10 grams of cloves).
  • The cloves are actually immature, unopened flower buds of the tropical tree in the myrtle family. While they are fresh, they are pink, and when they are dried they change their color in brown.

Preparation:

  • Chop everything together into dust in a coffee mill.
  • This is your healing powder for cleansing!

Consumption:

  • Take 2 tablespoons of it every day, for three days.
  • You can add the powder to cooked food in one meal, or eat it and then drink a glass of warm water (preferably in the morning).
  • After three days of taking this mixture, you should take a break for 3 days.
  • Then repeat everything again.
  • You should take this mixture for about one month.

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