Nutmeg

Nutmeg (Myristica fragrans)

Nutmeg and mace are plant products. Nutmeg is the shelled, dried seed of the plant Myristica fragrans, and mace is the dried net-like covering of the shell of the seed. Nutmeg and mace are used to make medicine.

Nutmeg and mace are used for diarrhea, nausea, stomach spasms and pain, and intestinal gas. They are also used for treating cancer, kidney disease, and trouble sleeping (insomnia); increasing menstrual flow; causing a miscarriage; as a hallucinogen; and as a general tonic. Nutmeg and mace are applied to the skin to kill pain, especially pain caused by achy joints (rheumatism), mouth sores, and toothache.

Advertisement

In manufacturing, nutmeg oil is used as a fragrance in soaps and cosmetics. Nutmeg oil is distilled from worm-eaten nutmeg seeds. The worms remove much of the starch and fat, leaving the portions of the seed that are rich in oil.

Steam distilled Nutmeg Essential Oil is a warming oil that when used judiciously, it is a wonderful essential oil for use in helping to ease digestive complaints as well as muscular aches and pains. A little goes a long way for all essential oils, but this especially holds true for Nutmeg Essential Oil. It primarily contains monoterpenes, but also contains approximately 10% ethers including myristicine and safrole as well as the phenol methyeugenol.

Aromatically, Nutmeg Essential Oil is a warm, spicy essential oil that is sweet and somewhat woody. It blends beautifully with other essential oils in the spice family. It also blends well with floral, citrus and wood essential oils. It can add a beautiful, distinctive spicy characteristic to otherwise bland blends.

Major Constituents of East Indian Nutmeg Oil:

Advertisement

  • Sabinene
  • a-Pinene
  • B-Pinene
  • Myristicin
  • Terpinene-4-ol
  • Gamma-Terpinene
  • Linalool
  • (+)-Limonene
  • a-Phellandrene
  • a-Terpinene
  • Safrole
  • a-Thujene
  • Methyleugenol (reported for East Indian Nutmeg Oil)

Nutmeg Essential Oil Uses

  • Gastrointestinal Spasm
  • Nausea
  • Upset Stomach
  • Rheumatism
  • Arthritis
  • Muscular Aches and Pains
  • Muscular Injury
  • Menstrual Cramps
  • Nervousness
  • Tension

Source: Valerie Ann Worwood, The Complete Book of Essential Oils and Aromatherapy, 25th Anniversary Edition (Novato, CA: New World Library, 2016, 609.

Benefits of Nutmeg

Antibacterial. Test-tube studies show that nutmeg has antibacterial effects against potentially harmful bacteria, including E. coli and Streptococcus mutans.

Antioxidants. Nutmeg is rich in antioxidants, including phenolic compounds, essential oils, and plant pigments, all of which help prevent cellular damage and may protect against chronic diseases.

Anti-inflammatory. Nutmeg may reduce inflammation by inhibiting certain inflammatory enzymes.

Increase Libido. Some animal research suggests that high doses of nutmeg may enhance libido and sexual performance.

May benefit heart health. Animal studies show that taking high-dose nutmeg supplements reduced heart disease risk factors, such as high cholesterol and high triglyceride levels, though human research is lacking.

Advertisement

Could boost mood. Rodent studies have found that nutmeg extract induced significant antidepressant effects in both mice and rats. Studies are needed to determine if nutmeg extract has the same effect in humans.

May improve blood sugar control. A study in rats showed that treatment with high-dose nutmeg extract significantly reduced blood sugar levels and enhanced pancreatic function.

Nutmeg has a warm, sweet flavor that pairs well with many different sweet and savory foods.

Nutmeg Essential Oil Safety Information

Nutmeg may cause serious side effects, such as hallucinations, rapid heartbeat, nausea, vomiting, and even death, when taken in large doses or combined with other recreational drugs.

Tisserand and Young warn that Nutmeg Essential Oil is potentially carcinogenic and can be psychotropic in high doses. They recommend a dermal maximum of 0.8% for East Indian and 5% for West Indian Nutmeg Oils. [Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young, Essential Oil Safety (Second Edition. United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier, 2014), 366-367.]

Advertisement

References:

  1. https://www.aromaweb.com/essential-oils/nutmeg-oil.asp
  2. https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-788/nutmeg-and-mace
  3. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/nutmeg-benefits
  4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5222521/
  5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3920909/
  6. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5927356/
  7. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3891177/
  8. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29926690
  9. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26434127
  10. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22449521
  11. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23570003
  12. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK493173/
  13. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20816778
  14. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4848392/
  15. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26434127
  16. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1187868/
  17. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14567759
  18. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4151601/
  19. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3434417/
  20. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16233309
  21. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4502738/
  22. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16579733
  23. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4075663/
  24. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31063201
  25. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13181-013-0379-7#page-1
  26. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4057546/
  27. https://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/sis/search/a?dbs+hsdb:@term+@DOCNO+3516

Myrtle Oil

Myrtus communis (flowers with Puccinia psidii). Location: Maui, Lower Kimo Rd Kula http://www.starrenvironmental.com/

Myrtle leaf oil (Myrtus communis)

Myrtle essential oil comes from the same family as eucalyptus, tea tree, bayberry and English bog myrtle. It is a small tree or large bush with lots of small, tough branches, small shaply pointed leaves and flowers followed by small, black berries. The leaves and flowers have a prominent fragrance.

Myrtle has been used in herbal medicine since ancient Egyptian times, as there are records showing the leaves being steeped in wine to combat fever and infection. The plant was dedicated to Aphrodite in Ancient Greece and Dioscórides prescribed macerated Myrtle wine to patients suffering from lung and bladder infections, as well as for tuberculosis. Dr Delious de Savgnac (1876) recommended Myrtle for the treatment of hemorrhoids, pulmonary infections, genital infections and problems with the bladder and urinary system.

Advertisement

The therapeutic properties of myrtle essential oil are anticatarrhal, antiseptic, astringent, bactericidal, expectorant and balsamic. The main chemical components are alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, limonene, cineole, alpha-terpinen-4-ol, myrtenol, geraniol, linalyl acetate, myrtenyl acetate and carvacrol.

Blends well with: atlas, bergamot, benzoin, black pepper, cedarwood, clary sage, clove, coriander, elmi, eucalyptus, frankincense, ginger, hyssop, jasmine, lavender, lemongrass, melissa, myrrh, neroli, peppermint, rose, rosemary, rosewood, spearmint, thyme, tea tree and ylang ylang essential oils.

Precautions: It is classed as a non-toxic, non-irritant and non-sensitizing oil – excessive use of it can lead to headaches and nausea.

Uses for Myrtle oil

Myrtle essential oil is primarily used for chronic pulmonary conditions, to expel phlegm and catarrh from the lungs. It is useful for acne prone skin and also as a sleeping aid, to uplift, refresh and restore. Myrtle oil is said to be of great benefit in helping people to cope with withdrawal from addiction. It has an uplifting effect on the body and mind and is helpful when used in cases of self-destructive behavior – it is said to cleanse the inner being and dissolve disharmony.

Advertisement

Myrtle, along with willow tree bark, occupies a prominent place in the writings of Hippocrates, Pliny, Dioscorides, Galen, and the Arabian writers. It has been prescribed for fever and pain by ancient physicians since at least 2,500 BC in Sumer. Myrtle’s effects are due to high levels of salicylic acid, a compound related to aspirin and the basis of the modern class of drugs known as NSAIDs.

CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2256192

Nutritional Value of Myrtle

Myrtle leaves and fruit contains a unique combination of organic compounds and nutrients that make it not only an interesting dietary addition as an herb but also as an invaluable source of essential oil. Myrtle contains various antioxidants and flavonoid compounds, including myricetin, as well as quercetin, catechin, citric and malic acids, linalool, pinene, tannins, and other sugars.

Benefits of Using Myrtle Essential Oil

Aphrodisiac: associated with Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love. It works very well to alleviate problems like impotency, frigidity, erectile dysfunctions, and loss of libido.

Anticancer Potential: highly praised for its high levels of antioxidants, including quercetin, tannins, myricetin, and catechin. These antioxidants have been widely studied and have been found to have anti-carcinogenic and anti-mutagenic properties. According to a research report in Natural Product Communications Journal, myrtle is quite similar in chemical composition to sandalwood, which has been connected to a reduction in prostate and breast cancer.

Astringent Properties: If used in mouthwash, myrtle essential oil makes the gums contract and strengthen their hold on the teeth. If ingested, it also makes the intestinal tracts and muscles contract. Furthermore, it contracts and tightens the skin and helps to diminish wrinkles. It can also help stop hemorrhaging by inducing the blood vessels to contract.

Eases Breathing: counters the accumulation of phlegm and catarrh in the respiratory tracts. This property also curbs the formation of mucus and provides relief from coughs and breathing trouble.

Eliminates Bad Odor: It can be used in incense sticks and burners, fumigants, and vaporizers as room fresheners. It can also be used as a body deodorant or perfume. It has no side effects like itching, irritation or patches on the skin like certain commercial deodorants.

Advertisement

Expectorant: reduces the presence and further deposition of phlegm. It also clears congestion of the nasal tracts, bronchi, and lungs resulting from colds and provides good relief from coughing.

Fights Infections: inhibits infections since it is a bactericidal, germicidal, fungicidal, and antiviral substance. It also helps to reduce infections in the stomach and intestines, while helping to stop diarrhea.

Hormone Balance: Extensive research has been conducted around the world regarding the effects of myrtle essential oil on the endocrine system, primarily in regulation of the thyroid gland. It has been shown that myrtle essential oil, whether consumed or inhaled, can positively affect the release of hormones, including those related to the ovaries and women’s reproductive health.

Maintains Healthy Nerves: It maintains the stability of the nerves and keeps you from becoming nervous or unnecessarily stressed over small issues. It is a beneficial agent against nervous and neurotic disorders, shaking limbs, fear, vertigo, anxiety, and stress.

Prevents Infections: This property makes myrtle essential oil a suitable substance to apply on wounds. It does not let microbes infect the wounds and thereby protects against sepsis and tetanus, in case of an iron object being the cause of the damage.

Advertisement

Relaxes the Body: The essential oil of myrtle relaxes and sedates. This property also provides relief from tension, stress, annoyance, anger, distress, and depression, as well as from inflammation, irritation, and various allergies.

Myrtle can be used for skin care and against hemorrhoids, acne, pimples, cystitis, infections in the urinary tract, and chronic problems like leucorrhea. And, it is effective against chest infections in both babies and the elderly.

Words of Caution: There is no inherent risk in using myrtle essential oil, but as always, pay attention to your body’s reaction to any new substance or supplement, and consult a doctor if anything unusual occurs.

References:

https://www.aromaweb.com/essential-oils/myrtle-oil.asp

https://www.rockymountainoils.com/myrtle.html/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24706627

Advertisement

https://essentialoils.co.za/essential-oils/myrtle.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myrtus

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/6fcd/0559ad9e36b544d09f503040df4d63e151c5.pdf

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/b0db/33d673dd4f71b8075dc1dafd5ca30765c2ec.pdf

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10496475.2011.556986

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0944501313001766

https://www.mdpi.com/1420-3049/23/10/2502

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/283500310_Identify_the_essential_oils_in_Myrtus_communis_L_leaves

https://www.organicfacts.net/myrtle-essential-oil.html

Myrrh Oil

Myrrh Resin Oil (Commiphora myrrha)

Myrrh is a sap-like substance (resin) that comes out of cuts in the bark of trees that are members of the Commiphora species. It is familiar to many as one of the traditional resinous gifts mentioned in the Bible. It has been used for thousands of years in traditional healing therapies and in religious ceremonies. Its amber scent creates a warm, calming environment. The oil is often used during meditation to create a relaxing and uplifting atmosphere.

You can find Myrrh in Mother Jai’s Divinity Spray & Oil, shop below.

Myrrh is commonly used for indigestion, ulcers, colds, cough, asthma, lung congestion, arthritis pain, cancer, leprosy, spasms, and syphilis. It is also used as a stimulant and to increase menstrual flow. Applied directly to the mouth for soreness and swelling, inflamed gums (gingivitis), loose teeth, canker sores, bad breath, and chapped lips. It is also used topically for hemorrhoids, bedsores, wounds, abrasions, and boils.

Advertisement

Blending: Frankincense, Lavender, Palma Rosa, Patchouli, Rosewood, Sandal Wood, Tea Tree, and Thyme essential oil blend well with this oil.

Benefits of Using Myrrh

Anti-Cancer & Antioxidant Benefits: researchers found that it was able to reduce the proliferation or replication of human cancer cells. They found that myrrh inhibited growth in eight different types of cancer cells, specifically gynecological cancers. Although further research is needed to determine exactly how to use myrrh for cancer treatment, this initial research is promising. As a strong antioxidant it helps prevent cellular oxidation which thus helps to prevent cancer and tumor formation. Studies have shown that its benefits are improved when combined with Frankincense.

Anti-Catarrhal Properties: This oil relieves you of excess mucus and phlegm and troubles associated with mucus deposition like congestion, breathing trouble, heaviness in chest, and cough.

Anti-Inflammatory Properties: it sedates inflammation in various tissues in case of fever or viral infections. It also treats indigestion resulting from consumption of spicy food and protects the circulatory system from toxins.

Advertisement

Astringent Properties: Myrrh essential oil is an astringent, which means that it strengthens the gums and muscles, intestines, and other internal organs, and smoothens the skin. It also strengthens the grip of hair roots, thereby preventing hair loss. One more serious aspect of this astringent property is that it stops hemorrhaging in wounds. When this astringency makes the blood vessels contract and checks the flow of blood, it can stop you from losing too much blood when wounded.

Improves Digestion: This essential oil helps relieve you of those gases which often result in embarrassing situations in public. Myrrh oil is beneficial for the all-around health of your stomach.

Improve Thyroid Function: If you suffer from hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid gland), you may be looking for natural ways to boost the function of your thyroid, which helps manage metabolism, and when not working properly can cause fatigue, weight gain, joint pain, dry skin, and hair loss. Myrrh essential oil is ideal to help supplement your thyroid medication to get your thyroid hormone levels back up to normal.

Increases Perspiration: this essential oil increases perspiration and removes toxins, extra salt, and excess water from your body. Sweating also cleans the skin pores and helps harmful gases like nitrogen escape.

Inhibits Microbial Growth & Prevents Infection: Myrrh essential oil does not allow microbes to grow or infect your system. It can be used to prevent many problems occurring due to microbial infections such as fever, food poisoning, cough and cold, mumps, measles, pox, and infection of wounds. Myrrh essential oil acts as a fungicide as well. It can be used both internally and externally to fight fungal infections. It has no adverse side effects, unlike other antibiotics, such as weakening of liver or digestive malfunction.

Protects Overall Health: As a tonic, myrrh oil tones up all the systems and organs in the body, giving them strength and protection from premature aging and infection. Helps protects wounds from infections and heals them quickly. Myrrh oil strengthens and activates the immune system and keeps the body protected from infections.

Relieves Spasms: It provides relief from unwanted contractions or spasms and therefore eases cramps, aches, and muscle pain.

Advertisement

Skin Health: Myrrh can help maintain healthy skin by soothing chapped or cracked patches. It is commonly added to skin care products to help with moisturizing and for fragrance. Ancient Egyptians used it to prevent aging and maintain healthy skin. A research study in 2010 discovered that topical application of myrrh oil helped elevate white blood cells around skin wounds, leading to faster healing.

Stimulates Blood Circulation: This powerful essential oil stimulates blood circulation and ensures a proper supply of oxygen to the tissues. This is good for attaining a proper metabolic rate as well as for boosting the immune system. Increasing the blood flow to all the parts of the body helps in staying healthy.

Stimulates the Nervous System: Myrrh essential oil stimulates thoughts, blood circulation, digestion, nervous activity, and excretion. It stimulates the pumping action of the heart, secretion of digestive juices and bile into the stomach, and keeps you alert and active by stimulating the brain and the nervous system.

Treat Diseases of the Mouth and Gums: Because it has both anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties, myrrh essential oil is great for soothing sores of the mouth and for treating gingivitis (gum inflammation). Myrrh also relieves toothaches and freshens the breath. You can add a drop or two of myrrh essential oil to your mouthwash or toothpaste for its freshening and healing benefits.

Other Benefits: This oil is highly valued in aromatherapy as a sedative, antidepressant, and as a promoter of spiritual feelings. It takes care of uterine health and stimulates that organ, helps fade away scars and spots, pyorrhea, diarrhea, and skin diseases such as eczema, ringworm, and itches. It is also an emmenagogue which means that it normalizes menstruation and relieves associated symptoms like mood swings and hormonal imbalances.

Advertisement

By Franz Eugen Köhler, Köhler’s Medizinal-Pflanzen – List of Koehler Images, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=255283

Side Effects of Using Myrrh

Myrrh seems safe for most people when used in small amounts. It can cause some side effects such as skin rash if applied directly to the skin, and diarrhea if taken by mouth. Large doses may be UNSAFE. Amounts greater than 2-4 grams can cause kidney irritation and heart rate changes.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Taking myrrh by mouth during pregnancy is UNSAFE and should be avoided. Myrrh can stimulate the uterus and might cause a miscarriage. There isn’t enough information to rate the safety of using myrrh on the skin during pregnancy, so until more is known, it’s best to avoid this use. Breast-feeding mothers should also avoid using myrrh. Not enough is known about the safety of using myrrh when breast-feeding.

Diabetes: Myrrh might lower blood sugar. There is a concern that if it is used along with medications that lower blood sugar, blood sugar might drop too low. If you use myrrh as well as medications for diabetes, monitor your blood sugar carefully.

Fever: Myrrh might make a fever worse. Use with caution.

Heart problems: Large amounts of myrrh can affect heart rate. If you have a heart condition, get your healthcare provider’s advice before starting myrrh.

Surgery: Since myrrh might affect blood glucose levels, there is a concern that it might interfere with blood glucose control during and after surgery. Stop using myrrh at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Advertisement

Systemic inflammation: If you have systemic inflammation, use myrrh with caution, since it might make this condition worse.

Uterine bleeding: Myrrh seems to be able to stimulate uterine bleeding, which is why some women use it to start their menstrual periods. If you have a uterine bleeding condition, use myrrh with caution, since it might make this condition worse.

Prescription Medication Interactions

Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs) interacts with MYRRH: Myrrh might decrease blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking myrrh along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.<br><nb>Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.

Warfarin (Coumadin) interacts with MYRRH: Warfarin (Coumadin) is used to slow blood clotting. Taking myrrh might decrease how well warfarin (Coumadin) works to slow blood clotting. This could increase the chance of blood clotting.

Recipes

Thyroid Support Oil

Ingredients:

  • 3 drops myrrh EO
  • 3 drops clove EO
  • 3 drops lemongrass EO
  • 2 drops frankincense EO
  • 2 drops peppermint EO
  • fractionated coconut oil

Directions:

  • Combine the five essential oils listed above in a 10 ml glass bottle with a rollerball top.
  • Top with fractionated (liquid) coconut oil.
  • Apply to the neck in the area of the thyroid gland and on the appropriate reflexology points on the soles of the feet to boost thyroid function with hypothyroidism (low thyroid).

Poison Ivy Relief Balm

Ingredients:

  • 12 drops lavender essential oil
  • 6 drops myrrh essential oil
  • 30 ml carrier oil (jojoba, coconut, olive, almond, etc.)

Directions:

  • Combine the two essential oils in a glass bottle.
  • Add the carrier oil.
  • Apply to poison ivy rash to sooth itching and irritation.

Oil Blend for Minimizing Scars and Stretch Marks

Ingredients:

  • 5 drops myrrh EO
  • 10 drops helichrysum EO
  • 4 drops patchouli EO
  • 6 drops lavender EO
  • 8 drops lemongrass EO

Directions:

  • Add 1 ounce of your favorite carrier oil to a small dropper bottle.
  • Add each of the essential oils listed above one at a time.
  • Roll the bottle between your hands after adding each oil to incorporate it fully.
  • Apply oil to scars or stretch marks to minimize their feel and appearance.

Nail Strengthener

Ingredients:

  • 15 drops myrrh essential oil
  • 15 drops lavender essential oil
  • 2 vitamin E capsules
  • 1 oz. (approximately) carrier oil (e.g., fractionated coconut, almond, jojoba, avocado, etc.)

Directions:

  • Add the myrrh and lavender essential oils to a small dropper bottle.
  • Open the vitamin E capsules and empty them into the bottle.
  • Top the mixture with the carrier oil.
  • Place the lid on the bottle, and shake to combine the ingredients.
  • Apply to nails regularly with a cotton swab or small brush to make them stronger and healthier looking.

Royal Egyptian Perfume

Ingredients:

  • 7 drops myrrh EO
  • 9 drops patchouli EO
  • 7 drops cedarwood EO
  • 9 drops amber EO
  • 9 drops rose EO
  • 5 drops vanilla EO
  • 7 drops frankincense EO
  • 1 cup (approximately) almond oil

Directions:

  • Add the essential oils to an 8-ounce glass bottle.
  • Top with almond oil to fill.
  • Roll the bottle gently to blend the ingredients.
  • Set the bottle aside for 3-4 weeks in a dark place for the aroma intensity to increase.
  • Apply to pulse points for an exotic scent.

References:

https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-570/myrrh

https://draxe.com/myrrh-oil/