Healthy Hair

Healthy Hair Naturally

We know our lifestyles and environments have a huge impact on our physical health. Our hair and skin are the first to show chemical damage. Eating a healthy diet and exercising regularly help, of course, yet they aren’t enough when you’re using commercially produced, chemical laden products on your hair. So here are some natural options for strengthening and lengthening hair.

Proper Nutrition for Healthy Hair

A nutritious diet that contains healthful fats, protein, and a range of vitamins can help with thinning or thin hair. In fact, thin hair can be a sign that a person is not getting enough nutrients. To help remedy this, people with thin hair should include some of the following nutrient-rich foods in their diets:

  • salmon, which is high in protein and fatty acids
  • eggs, which contain protein, omega 3, and iron
  • walnuts, almonds, and other nuts, which are sources of fatty acids
  • greek yogurt, which is a source of protein
  • green, black, pinto, and other beans, which contain protein

A person should look to add 1 or 2 servings of any of the above foods to their daily diet. Even adding just 3 or 4 servings a week can contribute to improved hair health.

Regular Combing & Trimming

Comb your hair three times a day and trim it in every three months. Regular combing and trimming is extremely important for expediting the growth of new hair. Combing is essential as it provides good blood circulation, and stimulates hair follicles, helping them produce new hair naturally.

Proper Washing Technique

  1. Wash with warm water and rinse with cold.
  2. Use finger tips, not nails, to massage scalp and stimulate follicles.
  3. Always massage conditioners and oils into the scalp with circular motions.

Shampoo is Important

The type of shampoo you are using can have drastic effects on the health of your hair. It’s best to use a natural soap or a petroleum and sulfate free blend. These only remove dirt and do not strip the hair of its natural oils like commercial surfactants.

Coconut Oil Soap: easy to make or purchase (https://www.motherjai.com/shop) Full of fatty acids essential for nourishing the scalp and hair follicles and gently removes dirt and grease without over drying (stripping) the hair.

Natural Conditioning Can Help

Much like shampoo, conditioner contents can have drastic effects on the health of your hair. So instead of a petroleum wax and oil laden blend, try something that actually nourishes your hair. Here are some natural ways to moisturize and strengthen hair.

Apple Cider Vinegar: gently cleanses the scalp and maintains the PH balance of the hair accelerating hair growth. How To Use:

  • Wash your hair
  • Use apple cider vinegar as a final rinse after washing your hair to get healthy and shiny hair.
  • For 1 liter of solution – mix 75ml of apple cider vinegar to one liter of water
  • You may store this entirely or make it smaller batches.
  • For smaller quantities, take 15 ml of apple cider vinegar and add it to a cup of warm filtered water
  • After washing your hair, using this cup of water as the final rinse.

Aloe Gel: Applying aloe oil directly to the hair and scalp may help strengthen the hair and thicken it over time. For a homemade solution, a person can try rubbing some pure aloe gel into the scalp and letting it sit for 30 minutes before rinsing. This can be done once or twice a week.

Avocado: Avocado is rich in vitamin E, and many people believe it to be a good moisturizer. Make a simple avocado rub and apply it twice a week. Do remember it can be an ugly, squishy avocado, not a green healthy one. To make an avocado rub:

  • combine the fruit of 1 avocado with 1 tbsp olive/sunflower/coconut oil
  • apply the mixture to hair and scalp
  • let it sit for about 30 minutes
  • rinse thoroughly with natural shampoo

Cayenne Pepper: stimulates hair growth and prevents thinning of hair. It has a chemical in it known as Capsaicin. This ingredient when applied on the scalp causes the nerves to activate and increase the blood flow to the scalp. This results in increased absorption of nutrients and better hair growth. How To Use:

  • Mix 1 teaspoon of pepper powder with 2 teaspoons of olive oil
  • Apply it on the scalp where thinning is more prominent
  • Wash off with cool water

Coconut Milk: rich in iron, potassium and essential fats. It reduces hair fall and breakage. How To Use:

  • Extract the milk of a coconut
  • Apply it on the targeted areas
  • Keep it overnight
  • Rinse off with cool water the next day

Coconut Oil: Rich in potassium, coconut oil keeps your scalp healthy; promotes the growth of new hair and repairs damaged hair. It also reduces dandruff, hair breakage and hair loss. Coconut oil is also used as a pre-conditioning hair treatment for damaged hair. It acts as a moisturizer and strengthens the hair shaft from the root, thus preventing breakage. It keeps the scalp well-nourished and moisturized. Use coconut hot oil treatment for effective results.

Cumin Seeds: packed with 100′s of nutrients and vitamins that are great for replenishing your hair. How To Use:

  • Soak cumin seeds in olive oil or castor oil
  • Let it soak overnight
  • The next morning, apply it to the targeted areas
  • Wash after 15 minutes with a mild shampoo

Eggs: high in protein, which is essential for the body to build strong, thick hair. When used regularly, an egg treatment may help thicken and strengthen a person’s hair. To use an egg treatment:

  • beat 1 or 2 eggs together
  • apply the eggs to the scalp and damp hair
  • leave the eggs on the scalp for about 30 minutes
  • wash hair thoroughly with warm water and mild shampoo

Alternately, combine the eggs with oil and water. To use this method:

  • mix egg yolks, 1 tablespoon (tbsp) olive oil, and 2 tbsp of water
  • apply the mixture to the scalp and dry hair
  • leave for 15 minutes
  • rinse out with warm water and a mild shampoo

Fenugreek: accelerates hair growth and protects the natural color of your hair. How To Use:

  • Take 1 teaspoon of the fenugreek paste
  • Add 2 teaspoons of coconut milk to it
  • Apply it all over your hair and scalp
  • Leave it on for 30 minutes
  • Wash off with a mild shampoo

Flaxseed Oil: rich source of essential fatty acids which helps to transform dry, damaged and brittle hair to healthy and shiny hair. The omega 3 fatty acids in the oil promote healthy hair growth. How To Use:

  • Include flaxseed oil supplements in your daily diet
  • Use it with the combination of other essential oils.

Garlic: home remedy for reducing the shedding of hair. Why? It boosts the regeneration of new hair and promotes the scalp circulation. How To Use:

  • Boil a few cloves of crushed garlic in olive oil or coconut oil
  • Apply it to the roots of your hair follicles.
  • Wash off properly

Green Tea: antioxidants prevent hair loss and boost hair growth. How To Use:

  • Apply warm green tea all over your scalp
  • Leave it for an hour
  • Rinse off with cool water

Henna Pack: very well known as a natural conditioner. It is also good for hair growth. Why? It transforms dull and dry hair to smooth and shiny hair and adds colour too. It promotes hair growth by strengthening the roots of your hair. How To Use:

  • Make a pack by mixing 1 cup of dry henna powder with ½ cup of yoghurt
  • Apply it all over your hair from root to tip.
  • Leave the pack until it dries off completely
  • Wash off with a mild shampoo

Hibiscus Flower: the “flower of hair care.” This flower is used for curing dandruff and enhancing hair growth. It also thickens the hair and prevents pre-mature ageing. How To Use:

  • Make a paste of the hibiscus flower with coconut oil or sesame oil
  • Apply it on your hair evenly.
  • Rinse with a mild shampoo.

Indian Gooseberry (Amla):  powerhouse of antioxidants and vitamin C. Amla promotes healthy hair growth and also improves the pigmentation of the hair. How To Use:

  • Mix 2 teaspoons of amla powder or juice with 2 teaspoons of lime juice
  • Apply this on your scalp properly and let it dry
  • Now rinse it well with warm water

Olive Oil: rich in omega 3 acids and other nutrients that are essential for overall health, including hair health. When applied directly to the scalp and hair, olive oil helps promote thicker hair. Olive oil also has the added benefit of softening the hair and relieving dry scalp. Some people add honey to the olive oil and others suggest leaving the olive oil on overnight using a shower cap to cover the hair. To use olive oil:

  • heat the oil to body temperature
  • massage the warm oil into the scalp and hair
  • leave in hair for about 30 to 45 minutes
  • rinse out the olive oil with mild shampoo

Onion Juice: rich in sulphur that boosts collagen production in the tissues and helps in re-growth of hair. How To Use:

  • Use red onions or shallots
  • Chop it into small pieces
  • Squeeze out its juice.
  • Now apply it on your scalp carefully and keep for 15 minutes.
  • Finally rinse off with a mild shampoo.

Orange Puree: The vitamin C, pectin, and acid in oranges can help a person’s hair in a few different ways. The vitamins and nutrients may improve hair’s natural luster, which makes the hair appear thicker. The acid in oranges helps break apart residue left from hair products. These residues may interfere with hair growth. Unlike some of the other treatments, orange puree has a pleasant scent that makes the treatment more enjoyable. A person can use orange puree as a hair treatment by blending fresh oranges then massaging the puree into the hair and scalp. Leave the puree on the hair for about 1 hour before rinsing it out. Some people like to use a light conditioner to rehydrate their hair following an orange puree treatment.

Peppercorns: The use of black peppercorns is prevalent in the ayurvedic medicine. It leaves your hair soft and lustrous while improving the texture. Why? Black peppercorns have essential oils which keep your scalp well-hydrated. How To Use:

  • Blend 2 teaspoons of peppercorns with half a cup of lime juice
  • Form a smooth paste
  • Apply this paste on the roots
  • Cover your head with a warm towel for deep penetration.
  • Rinse off after half an hour.

Potato Juice: rich in Vitamin A, B and C. These are essential for healthy hair. This can be used even if you are suffering from alopecia i.e. thinning of hair. How To Use:

  • Place potato in an extractor for juicing
  • Apply the potato juice on the scalp
  • Leave it on for 15 minutes
  • Wash off using mild shampoo
  • Potato is good for use as face packs too.

Essential Oils to Improve Hair Health

Cedarwood: Cedarwood is used to help stimulate the hair follicles by increasing circulation to the scalp. It can promote hair growth and slow hair loss; it can also treat thinning hair and various types of alopecia. Cedarwood can be applied topically to the scalp and hair. It mixes well with gentle oils like lavender and carrier oils like coconut oil. You can also add 2–3 drops of cedarwood oil to your homemade conditioner.

Chamomile: it adds shine and softness to your hair while soothing your scalp.

Did you know that chamomile essential oil can be used to lighten your hair naturally? Combine 5 drops of chamomile essential oil with a tablespoon of sea salt and one-third cup of baking soda. Use warm water to create a paste and apply the mixture to your hair. Massage it into your scalp and at the base of your hair, then allow it to sit for about half an hour before rinsing it out. If you want a bolder affect, keep the paste on as you sit in the sun.

Clary Sage: works as a natural remedy for rashes, and it works as an antibacterial agent. But maybe most importantly, clary sage can be used to help you relieve stress and balance hormones. Three types of hair loss can be associated with high stress levels: telogen effluvium, trichotillomania (hair pulling) and alopecia areata. Because clary sage can be used to help relieve stress and reduce cortisol levels in the body, it works as a natural remedy for stress-induced hair loss.

Clary sage works well with jojoba oil; the two can help to regulate oil production on the skin, helping you to avoid scaly or flaky patches that lead to dandruff. To ease stress, which is associated with hair loss, you can diffuse clary sage oil at home or apply a few drops to your wrists, temples and bottoms of your feet.

Lavender: has antimicrobial properties, and it can be used to combat bacterial and fungal disorders. Some other lavender oil benefits are its ability to soothe the scalp and heal dry skin and hair. Plus, because emotional stress is a factor that can contribute to thinning hair, lavender oil can be used to create a tranquil and stress-free environment.

Lemongrass: has healing properties, and it works as an effective cleanser and deodorizer. It can strengthen your hair follicles and soothe an itchy and irritated scalp. Some bonus benefits of lemongrass oil include its ability to work as a natural bug repellant, relieve stress (which is associated with hair loss) and treat headaches.

You can add 10 drops of lemongrass oil to your bottle of shampoo or conditioner, or you can massage 2–3 drops into your scalp along with your conditioner daily. Lemongrass oil can also be diffused at home to reduce stress and detoxify the space.

Peppermint: helps to stimulate the scalp, and it can treat dandruff and even lice due to its powerful antiseptic properties. Research shows that peppermint oil promotes hair growth, too. In a 2014 animal study, topical application of peppermint oil for four weeks showed prominent hair growth effects, increasing dermal thickness, follicle number and follicle depth. Add 2–3 drops of peppermint to your shampoo or conditioner for a quick wake-me-up during your morning shower.

Rosemary: used to increase cellular metabolism, which stimulates hair growth and promotes healing. Research even shows that rosemary oil appears to work as well as minoxidil, a conventional topical hair loss treatment. When it comes to boosting your hair health, the benefits of rosemary oil also include preventing baldness, slowing the graying process and treating dandruff and dry scalp.

To use rosemary oil for your hair, take 3–5 drops and mix it with equal parts olive oil, and then massage the mixture into your scalp for about two minutes. Leave it in your hair for 3 to 4 hours, and then wash your hair as usual.

Tea Tree: has powerful cleansing, antibacterial, and antimicrobial properties. When used topically, it can help unplug hair follicles and increase hair growth. You can mix 10 drops of tea tree oil into your shampoo or conditioner and use it daily, or mix 3 drops with 2 tablespoons of a carrier oil and leave it on for 15 minutes before rinsing it out.

Thyme: help promote hair growth by both stimulating the scalp and actively preventing hair loss. Like cedarwood oil, thyme oil was also found to be helpful in treating alopecia areata. Thyme is particularly strong, even among essential oils. Put only 2 small drops in 2 tablespoons of a carrier oil before applying it to your scalp. Leave it on for about 10 minutes and wash it out.

Ylang Ylang: While those with oily hair and skin would want to skip this one, ylang-ylang oil is ideal for those with dry scalps, as it can stimulate sebum production. As lack of enough oil and sebum causes hair to become dry and brittle, ylang-ylang can improve hair texture and reduce hair breakage. Mix 5 drops of ylang-ylang oil with 2 tablespoons of warm oil. Massage it into your scalp and wrap your head with a warm towel. Leave it in for 30 minutes before washing it out.

DIY recipes that will also help to boost the health of your hair:

Thicken your hair: To help thicken your hair naturally, use this natural hair thickener that’s made with a combination of rosemary, cedarwood and sage essential oils. These oils will stimulate your hair follicles by increasing circulation to the scalp and helping to balance your hormones.

Style your hair: You want to avoid using conventional hair sprays because many conventional products on the market today include toxins that you don’t want anywhere near your head and face. To help set your hair and prevent fly aways, use this homemade hair spray that’s made with lavender and rosemary, plus vodka and cane sugar, which will give you the hold you’re looking for.

Prevent oily/greasy hair: Add 2–3 drops of peppermint oil to your conditioner to get rid of greasy hair.

Add shine: Giving your hair and scalp a good hair mask treatment on a weekly basis can help take care of unruly strands, moisturize your hair and add shine.

Lighten your hair: Add 2–3 drops of chamomile oil to your hair before going out in the sun.

References:

  1. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/319862.php
  2. https://www.healthline.com/health/beauty-skin-care/how-to-get-thicker-hair
  3. https://www.rd.com/health/beauty/home-remedies-for-dry-damaged-hair/
  4. https://www.rd.com/health/beauty/healthy-hair-tips/
  5. https://www.naturalgirlsrock.com/blogs/rockin-guest-bloggers-speak/28748737-31-natural-hair-growth-remedies
  6. https://www.healthline.com/health/essential-oils-for-hair-growth#essential-oils
  7. https://draxe.com/essential-oils-for-hair/

Stop Using Clays

Bentonite

Stop Using Clay on Your Skin and in Your Mouth

Mother Jai is always concerned with providing natural products made from raw ingredients collected from the Earth. What we did not consider was the amount of pollution people have accumulated in the environment where these raw ingredients are collected from. So we now know that even ‘food grade’ bentonite clay or montmorillonite is full of heavy metals and pesticides absorbed from the environment. These harmful chemicals are then easily absorbed by the body when the clay is used. Originally the clay was useful and healing but because of what humans have done to Earth that is no longer the case.

The testing done on products made by Mother Jai with ‘food grade’ Bentonite Clay showed 79 parts per million of lead. More than 100 times the allowable amount in foods. Other samples of ‘food grade’ Bentonite clay have tested at 39 parts per million which is still sixty times the amount the body can process in a day.

Mother Jai wants to protect her customers and has chosen to remove bentonite clay from all products. The evidence is just too strong to ignore.

Mother Jai now blends toothpowder and mudd mask with Activated Charcoal.

Here is some evidence from the FDA –

The FDA focused on “Bentonite Me Baby,” a brand of powdered clay sold at stores including Target and Sally Beauty Supply. The label says it can be used as a facial or hair mask, or for ingestion. However, laboratory testing found that the product has a lead concentration of 37.5 parts per million (ppm). By comparison, the FDA says that lead levels above .05 ppm in fruit juice “may constitute a health hazard.”

What are the dangers and side effects of Bentonite clay?

#1. Toxic When Consumed

Despite the clay being one of the finest way to get a clear skin through cleaning the body system. It also internally detoxify the body to eliminate internal toxins believed to cause blemishes on the skin and quick aging. So, is it true that a Bentonite clay detox contribute to certain harmful impact? One of the main motives for applying this clay as an agent of detoxification is its capability to eliminate heavy metals from the body system. But, in the process of doing so, the mud can cause you intestinal distress. The remedy of this adverse effect of clay ingestion is drinking a lot of water since it may help pass out of your body system the dangerous compounds.

#2. Damages the Digestive System

Taking this mud is reported to clog up users’ lower intestine. If the situation gets out of hand, a surgical intervention may be required to save the victim’s life. The prospective of nutrient deficiencies is also claimed to the adverse effect of ingesting this clay. Your digestive system, teeth, and gums also can take a hit.

#3. Renders the Body More Exposed to Metal Impurities

Many bentonite products retailed in the market today are not naturally produced hence may contain certain toxic elements. Most of them have high levels of lead and arsenic. The presence of arsenic increases the danger of having lung, bladder, and skin cancers. The lead, on the other hand, can negatively affect your cardiovascular system and kidneys. It can also harm a young child’s central nervous system. Thus, a baby is put at risk if a pregnant mother consumes this clay. Summarily, the side effects of the Bentonite clay detox that you are likely to experience while taking it to rid your body of unwanted toxins and cleanse it include:

  • Joint stiffness and pain, which when combined with muscle pain, are symptoms of negative impact of the toxins deposited in the muscle and joint fluids being eradicated from your body.
  • Muscle tiredness and pain
  • A minor side effect of this clay is headaches

The above mentioned side effects are shared among people attempting to detoxify their body externally.

Surprising Danger About Bentonite Clay (https://drchristianson.com)

Many have shared how bentonite clay has helped their digestion or skin symptoms. The reasons why it may have helped seemed plausible to me, and I don’t doubt that many have had positive experiences. Since I’ve never seen much research either way, I never thought too much about it.

Recently, I heard a story about Megan Curran de Nieto, a fellow Minnesotan who was struggling to lower the blood lead levels of a local family. The levels did not come down despite avoiding typical lead sources.

Ms. Curran de Nieto was shopping in a nearby Target store when she noticed a product, called “Bentonite Me Baby”. She remembered that the family she was working with had been taking bentonite clay in hopes of detoxifying from lead. Ms. Curran de Nieto became suspicious, bought the clay and sent it to a lab for analysis.

Sure enough, the product was found to have unsafe levels of lead.

The FDA verified the results and went on to find similar problems with other bentonite products they tested.

The manufacturer of one of these products rejected these warnings, arguing that “lead that is naturally present in many foods and clays just are not available to the body.”

How much lead are we talking about?

The FDA report found that bentonite clay contained up to 37.5 micrograms of lead per gram. Mcg/g is same as parts per million (ppm). With an average oral dose of bentonite clay being 2 Tbsp. (0.72 ounce or 20.4 grams), this means your oral lead dose could be as high as 765 mcg.

Other companies, worried about the public being aware of lead in their products, have argued that we already consume high amounts of lead in common foods:

  • Fresh collard greens: 30 micrograms of lead (50x higher than prop 65 stipulates)
  • Dry roasted mix nuts: 20 mcg of lead
  • Brussels sprouts: 15 mcg of lead
  • Sweet potatoes: 16 mcg of lead
  • Spinach: 15 mcg of lead

The amount of lead present in the commonly used amount of bentonite clay is less than half of the lead found in spinach. To make the most direct comparison, if you assume an average serving size of 100 grams, spinach would likely have no more than 0.3 mcg total lead per serving as opposed to 765 mcg from clay.

How much lead is safe?

“There is no safe threshold for lead exposure,” according to a literature review on lead in psychiatry.

The World Health Organization states, “There is no known level of lead exposure that is considered safe.”

The Centers for Disease Control concludes the same: “No safe blood lead level in children has been identified. Lead exposure can affect nearly every system in the body. Because lead exposure often occurs with no obvious symptoms, it frequently goes unrecognized.”

OK, so none is safe, strictly speaking. In foods, since lead absorption varies tremendously from food to food, the FDA sets limits on different food categories. Most are below 0.1 ppm.

Why is lead a big deal?

Lead is one of the most thoroughly studied toxins and has been a bane to humans for millennia. Credible scientists have even blamed lead in the water as one of the principal causes behind the fall of Rome.

In kids, it creates behavioral problems, lower IQ, hyperactivity, hearing loss, seizures and growth delays. Kids and babies are less able to naturally detoxify lead from their bodies than adults.

In adults, lead can also slow our brains and affect mood symptoms, including depression and anxiety. Lead can cause vague symptoms like fatigue, numbness and tingling, digestive issues and joint pain. Growing evidence suggests that it can also be the culprit behind high blood pressure, heart disease, kidney damage, infertility in males and females and some cancers.

References:

  1. https://www.statnews.com/2016/02/02/detox-clay-fda-lead/
  2. http://www.lorebay.com/bentonite/bentonite-clay-dangers-side-effects-red-face/
  3. https://drchristianson.com/surprising-danger-about-bentonite-clay/
  4. Susan Perry, “A Minnesotan’s Shopping Trip to Target sparks FDA warning about Bentonite Clay ‘Detox’ Product,” The MinnPost, February 3, 2016: https://www.minnpost.com/second-opinion/2016/02/minnesotans-shopping-trip-target-sparks-fda-warning-about-bentonite-clay-deto.
  5. “Best Bentonite Clay by Best Bentonite: FDA Alert – Risk of Lead Poisoning,” U.S. Food and Drug Administration, March 23, 2016: http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch/SafetyInformation/SafetyAlertsforHumanMedicalProducts/ucm492157.html
  6. “Does Best Bentonite contain lead?” Best Bentonite: http://www.bestbentonite.com/lead.html.
  7. Mishra PC, Patel RK, “Removal of lead and zinc ions from water by low cost adsorbents,” Journal of Hazardous Materials, 2009 Aug 30;168(1):319-25, doi: 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2009.02.026.
  8. http://redmond.life/prop65/compare-lead-earthpaste-fruits/  2017 Redmond Life.
  9. Vorvolakos T, Arseniou S, Samakouri M, “There is no safe threshold for lead exposure: A literature review,” Psychiatriki., 2016 Jul-Sep;27(3):204-214.
  10. “Lead poisoning and health,” World Health Organization fact sheet, reviewed September 2016: http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs379/en/.
  11. Sun CC, et al., “Percutaneous absorption of inorganic lead compounds,” AIHA Journal (Fairfax, VA), 2002 Sep-Oct;63(5):641-6: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12529920.
  12. PubMed.gov listed studies: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=aluminum+silicate+toxicity.
  13. “Learn About Lead,” United States Environmental Protection Agency: https://www.epa.gov/lead/learn-about-lead.
  14. “Lead Exposure in Adults – A Guide for Health Care Providers,” New York State Department of Health: https://www.health.ny.gov/publications/2584/.
  15. Scelfo GM, Flegal AR, “Lead in Calcium Supplements,” Environmental Health Perspectives, 2000 Apr; 108(4): 309–319: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1638001/   
  16. Ellender G, Graham K, “Connective tissue responses to some heavy metals. II: Lead: histology and ultrastructure,” Department of Preventative and Community Dentistry and Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Australia, Br. J. exp. Path. (I987) 68, 29I-307: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2013257/pdf/brjexppathol00009-0023.pdf.
  17. Blakely BR, “Overview of Lead Poisoning,” Merck Veterinary Manual: http://www.merckvetmanual.com/toxicology/lead-poisoning/overview-of-lead-poisoning.

Ginger Root

Fresh ginger

Ginger Root (Zingiber officinale)

Ginger (Zingiber officinale) is a flowering plant whose rhizome, ginger root or simply ginger, is widely used as a spice or a folk medicine. Ginger is in the family Zingiberaceae, to which also belong turmeric (Curcuma longa), cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum), and galangal. Ginger originated in the tropical rainforests from the Indian subcontinent to Southern Asia where ginger plants show considerable genetic variation. As one of the first spices exported from the Orient, ginger arrived in Europe during the spice trade, and was used by ancient Greeks and Romans. The distantly related dicots in the genus Asarum are commonly called wild ginger because of their similar taste.

Fresh ginger

Other Common Names: Jamaican ginger, Indian Ginger, gan-jiang, sheng-jiang, African ginger, black ginger, zingiber officinale.

The English origin of the word, “ginger”, is from the mid-14th century, from Old English gingifer, from Medieval Latin gingiber, from Greek zingiberis, from Prakrit (Middle Indic) singabera, from Sanskrit srngaveram, from srngam “horn” and vera- “body”, from the shape of its root. The word probably was readopted in Middle English from Old French gingibre (modern French gingembre).

Ginger root and powder

Ginger Nutrition

Raw ginger is composed of 79% water, 18% carbohydrates, 2% protein, and 1% fat (table). In 100 grams (a standard amount used to compare with other foods), raw ginger supplies 80 Calories and contains moderate amounts of vitamin B6 (12% of the Daily Value, DV) and the dietary minerals, magnesium (12% DV) and manganese (11% DV), but otherwise is low in nutrient content. When used as a spice powder in a common serving amount of one US tablespoon (5 grams), ground dried ginger (9% water) provides negligible content of essential nutrients, with the exception of manganese (70% DV).

100 grams (about 3.5 ounces) of raw ginger contains approximately (3):

  • 80 calories
  • 17.8 grams carbohydrates
  • 1.8 grams protein
  • 0.7 grams fat
  • 2 grams dietary fiber
  • 415 milligrams potassium (12 percent DV)
  • 0.2 milligrams copper (11 percent DV)
  • 0.2 milligrams manganese (11 percent DV)
  • 43 milligrams magnesium (11 percent DV)
  • 5 milligrams vitamin C (8 percent DV)
  • 0.2 milligrams vitamin B6 (8 percent DV)
  • 0.7 milligrams niacin (4 percent DV)
  • 34 milligrams phosphorus (3 percent DV)
  • 0.6 milligrams iron (3 percent DV)

In addition to the nutrients listed above, ginger also contains a small amount of calcium, zinc, pantothenic acid, riboflavin and thiamin. However, keep in mind that most people consume a very small portion of ginger, so it should be combined with a variety of other nutrient-dense foods to meet your micronutrient needs.

Ginger tea

Benefits of Using Ginger Root

Ginger has been used for in cooking and traditional medicine for thousands of years. It is currently one of the most widely used herbs worldwide.

  • It has been used traditionally for a long time to treat nausea. Scientific evidence confirms its uses as an herbal remedy for nausea and related ailments such as morning sickness and motion sickness.
  • Several studies have found that ginger could help prevent the formation of stomach ulcers. In fact, one 2011 animal study showed that ginger powder protected against aspirin-induced stomach ulcers by decreasing levels of inflammatory proteins and blocking the activity of enzymes related to ulcer development.
  • Ginger contains many anti-fungal compounds which make it a popular herb for treating athlete’s foot. Fungal infections cause a wide variety of conditions, from yeast infections to jock itch and athlete’s foot. Fortunately, ginger has powerful anti-fungal properties that can safely and successfully help kill off disease-causing fungi.
  • The health benefits of ginger are largely due to its antioxidants, anti-inflammatory properties and content of therapeutic compounds like gingerol, shogaol, paradol and zingerone. Studies have shown that ginger root inhibits the production of cytokines, which promote inflammation. Therefore, the traditional Indian use for treating inflammation is gaining new-found popularity.
  • Some of the other traditional Asian uses for this herb include stimulating the appetite, promoting perspiration, and fighting body odor.
  • It has been used to treat pain and traditional Indian Ayurvedic medicinal uses include ginger root in herbal arthritis treatment. Treatment of joint pain, especially those conditions caused by poor circulation, is another popular use of this herb.
  • Heart health is another benefit of ginger use. It has been shown to slow the production of LDL and triglycerides in the liver and prevent the clotting and aggregation of platelets in the blood vessels, associated with atherosclerosis and blood clots.
  • One of the most impressive benefits of ginger is its anti-cancer properties, thanks to the presence of a powerful compound called 6-gingerol. Test-tube studies show that ginger and its components may be effective in blocking cancer cell growth and development for ovarian, pancreatic and prostate cancer. However, more research is needed to determine how the anti-cancer properties of ginger may translate to humans.
  • Unfortunately, adverse side effects like pain, period cramps and headaches are commonly associated with menstruation for many women. While some turn to over-the-counter medications to provide symptom relief, natural remedies like ginger can be just as useful at easing menstrual pain.
  • The root has also been used to treat some of the symptoms of common cold and flu such as loosening phlegm and treating chills. During cold weather, drinking ginger tea is good way to keep warm. It is diaphoretic, which means that it promotes sweating, working to warm the body from within. To make ginger tea at home, slice 20 to 40 grams (g) of fresh ginger and steep it in a cup of hot water. Adding a slice of lemon or a drop of honey adds flavor and additional benefits, including vitamin C and antibacterial properties.

Ginger for Your Skin and Hair (GingerParrot.co.uk)

Here are our favorite Ten Beauty Benefits of Ginger for Skin and Hair – they’re all reasons to eat ginger every day!

  1. Anti-ageing: Redheads are well-versed in the importance of wearing SPF to protect the skin from the sun, the biggest influence of the appearance of ageing. But eating ginger can also help fight wrinkles! The food is packed with the super-foodiness of anti-oxidants, which reduce toxins in skin cells while increasing blood circulation, helping to reduce the appearance of ageing.
  2. Blemishes and Acne: Not only is ginger great for anti-ageing, it can also help with spots and imperfections. Ginger contains powerful antiseptic and cleansing qualities, minimizing the rate of spot and acne formation by actively killing bacteria on the skin’s surface and deep inside the pores. And sensitive-skinned redheads will be pleased to know that ginger is the best natural acne-fighting solution, so it’s great for those with delicate skin.
  3. Soothes burns and blisters: Probably not wise to apply immediately after a new burn, but your skin has cooled, fresh ginger juice is said to soothe and heal blisters, burnt skin or sunburn.
  4. Radiant skin: As odd as it sounds, slices of ginger root applied to your face can help to give you a refreshing glow. We agree that it doesn’t sound too glamourous, so perhaps try it when you’re home alone.
  5. Skin toning: While cleaning, fighting blemishes and making your skin more radiant, ginger also gets to work on toning your skin. A face mask is an ideal method for this. Try mixing grated ginger with a natural mask mix (or store-bought); it’ll help to moisturize and soften the skin, leaving it supple and glowing.
  6. Hypopigmental (white) scars: If you have scarred areas that are slightly lighter in pigmentation than the rest of your skin, a piece of fresh ginger can help. For noticeable results, hold a sliver of fresh ginger on the white scar for 30-40 minutes. This should be done every day for at least a week, at which point you should start seeing the color come back to your skin.
  7. Reduces hair loss: Ginger root makes your ginger roots stronger! Thus reducing hair loss, something we obviously want to prevent – keep living the ginger dream!
  8. Stimulates hair growth: Not only does ginger reduce hair loss, but it increases blood circulation to the scalp, also making hair silky and shiny at the same time.
  9. Fights dandruff: Ginger contains natural antiseptic properties which help to fight dandruff issues.
  10. Split ends: With its anti-oxidants, ginger can seriously help to repair any split ends and dry hair problems. Mix some ginger oil with your shampoo and watch how its natural moisturizing powers help to fix any dryness.
Ginger and lemon tea

Therapeutic Dosages

Ginger is available in fresh or dried root, tablets, capsules, powder, tincture, and tea forms. Customary daily dosages are:

Fresh Ginger Root: 1/3 of an ounce of fresh ginger root daily. This can be taken in tea form or used in baking or other herbal uses. Take five to six thin slices of fresh ginger and steep it in hot water for thirty minutes to make a fresh ginger tea.

Dried Ginger Root: 150 to 300 milligrams of the dried root can be taken three times daily in capsule or powder form.

It may also be used to make tea. A teaspoonful of the dried powder may be added to a pint of hot water and steeped for 30 minutes to make the tea.

Tablets and capsules generally come in 150 mg to 500 mg doses.

Ginger tea

Potential Side Effects of Using Ginger

Allergic reactions to ginger generally result in a rash. Although generally recognized as safe, ginger can cause heartburn and other side effects, particularly if taken in powdered form. Unchewed fresh ginger may result in intestinal blockage, and individuals who have had ulcers, inflammatory bowel disease, or blocked intestines may react badly to large quantities of fresh ginger. It can also adversely affect individuals with gallstones and may interfere with the effects of anticoagulants, such as warfarin or aspirin.

  • Pregnant women should be careful with ginger due to its potential to cause uterine contractions.
  • It has also been shown to interfere with the absorption of dietary iron and fat-soluble vitamins.
  • Stomach upset is a common side effect with larger doses. It may potentiate the effects of blood thinners, barbiturates, beta-blockers, insulin, and other diabetes medications.
  • Due to the blood thinning effect, it should not be used before surgery.
Ginger and lemon

Benefits Of Lemon Ginger Tea: health benefits of this unusual infusion!

Treats Nausea & Indigestion – Ginger has a very powerful active ingredient, named zingiber, which is able to eliminate bacterial pathogens that often attack the stomach and compromise digestive function. Ginger is also known to soothe nausea and eliminate vomiting while promoting more effective digestion and nutrient absorption. Lemon, on the other hand, is closely linked to reducing indigestion and heartburn!

Improves Cognitive Function – Lemon and ginger help in improving concentration and cognition. Fortunately, both of these ingredients are also excellent at soothing nerves and improving mood, which means clear thinking, while the antioxidant effects mean less oxidative stress and a lower chance of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

Skin Care – The high vitamin content of lemon and ginger, combined with their numerous antioxidants, make this infusion an excellent option for improving the skin health. You can drink this tea or even apply it topically to irritated patches of skin. Antioxidants help to reduce oxidative stress in the skin and promote the growth of new cells, while the antibacterial and antiviral nature of this beverage protects the skin from infections.

Weight Loss – Ginger is well known to stimulate the metabolism and can also help to satiate feelings of hunger. Therefore, a glass of lemon ginger tea in the morning can help those who are trying to lose weight, primarily by adding extra calorie-burning to their day and suppressing the desire to snack between meals.

Hair Care – Lemon and ginger have both been used independently for hair health for centuries, but this tea is high in vitamin A and C, both of which are linked to improve hair growth, and a reduce dry skin and dandruff. This can strengthen your hair and give it a luscious appearance.

Boosts Immunity – Both lemon and ginger are known around the world as immune system aids, so it makes sense that lemon ginger tea can comprehensively protect you from pathogens and illness. When you are suffering from a cold or flu, simply drink 1-2 cups of this tea each day and quickly see an improvement in your symptoms and a reduction in irritation of your respiratory tracts.

Controls Diabetes – When it comes to blood sugar regulation, few things are as effective as ginger. By optimizing the release of insulin and blood sugar in your body, you can prevent the dangerous spikes and drops in blood sugar that can lead to diabetes or can affect someone already diagnosed with this condition.

Relieves Pain – The natural anti-inflammatory nature of ginger not only reduces irritation, swelling, and inflammation in the body but can also function as an analgesic. This tea can help you recover from body pain, menstrual cramps, illness, and surgeries.

Improves Mood – Aside from this infusion’s effect on concentration and cognitive function, lemon and ginger are also known as mood boosters. There is a good reason why lemon is so commonly used in aromatherapy approaches, while ginger is known to relieve tension and lower stress hormone levels in the body, which can definitely make you feel happier and more in control of your emotions.

Side Effects Of Lemon Ginger Tea – Some people suffer from heartburn or stomach upset when they drink this beverage, which could be the response of a sensitive stomach to ginger’s powerful active ingredients or even a ginger allergy. Speak to your doctor or allergist before making any major changes to your diet or health regimen.

References:

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ginger
  2. https://www.herbal-supplement-resource.com/ginger-root.html
  3. http://nccih.nih.gov/health/ginger/
  4. http://powo.science.kew.org/taxon/urn:lsid:ipni.org:names:798372-1
  5. http://bja.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/84/3/367
  6. https://draxe.com/10-medicinal-ginger-health-benefits/
  7. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21753209
  8. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16117605
  9. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/star.19820340203
  10. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09712119.2011.558612
  11. https://journals.humankinetics.com/doi/abs/10.1123/ijatt.2014-0142
  12. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/228476601_Chemical_composition_and_antioxidant_properties_of_ginger_root_Zingiber_officinale
  13. http://www.academicjournals.org/article/article1380710823_Shirin%20and%20Jamuna.pdf
  14. http://www.jafs.com.pl/Effects-of-dose-and-adaptation-time-of-ginger-root-Zingiber-officinale-on-rumen-fermentation,66200,0,2.html
  15. https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/herbs-and-spices/ginger.html
  16. https://www.sigmaaldrich.com/life-science/nutrition-research/learning-center/plant-profiler/zingiber-officinale.html
  17. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/265990.php
  18. https://wellnessmama.com/7958/ginger-root/
  19. https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-961/ginger
  20. https://gingerparrot.co.uk/ten-beauty-benefits-of-ginger-for-your-hair-and-skin/
  21. https://www.livestrong.com/article/73965-cleanse-face-skin-ginger/

Geranium

Multicolor Geraniums

Rose Geranium flower & oil (Pelargonium graveolens)

Pelargonium graveolens, Rose Geranium, is an uncommon Pelargonium species native to the Cape Provinces and the Northern Provinces of South Africa, Zimbabwe and Mozambique. It is in the subgenus Pelargonium along with Pelargonium crispum, Pelargonium tomentosum and Pelargonium capitatum.

You will find Geranium essential oil in Mother Jai’s Aroma Sprays, Toners, & Bath Oils.

There are many cultivars of P. graveolens and they have a wide variety of scents, including rose, citrus, mint and cinnamon as well as various fruits. Cultivars and hybrids include:

  • P. ‘Graveolens’ (or Pelargonium graveolens hort.) – A rose-scented cultivar of P. graveolens. Possibly a hybrid between P. graveolens and P. radens or P. capitatum. This cultivar is often incorrectly labeled as Pelargonium graveolens (the species). The main difference between the species and this cultivar is the dissection of the leaf. The species had about 5 lobes but the cultivar has about 10.
  • P. ‘Citrosum’ – A lemony, citronella-scented cultivar of P. graveolens, similar to P. ‘Graveolens’. It is meant to repel mosquitos and rumour has it that it was made by genetically bonding genes from the citronella grass but this is highly unlikely.
  • P. ‘Cinnamon Rose’ – A cinnamon-scented variety of P. graveolens.
  • P. ‘Dr Westerlund’ – A lemony rose-scented cultivar of P. graveolens, similar to P. ‘Graveolens’.[citation needed]
  • P. ‘Graveolens Bontrosai’ – A genetically challenged form of P. graveolens. The leaves are smaller and curl back on themselves and the flowers often don’t open fully. Known as P. ‘Colocho’ in the US.
  • P. ‘Grey Lady Plymouth’ – A lemony rose-scented cultivar of P. graveolens. Similar to P. ‘Lady Plymouth’. The leaves are grey – green in colour and beautifully contrast of scented pelargonium varieties.
  • P. ‘Lady Plymouth’ – A minty lemony rose-scented cultivar of P. graveolens. A very popular variety with a definite mint scent. Possibly a P. radens hybrid.
  • P. ‘Lara Starshine’ – A lemony rose-scented cultivar of P. graveolens, similar to P. ‘Graveolens’ but with more lemony scented leaves and reddish pink flowers. Bred by Australian Plantsman Cliff Blackman.
  • P. ‘Lucaeflora’ – A rose-scented variety of P. graveolens, much more similar to the species that most other cultivars and varieties of P. graveolens.
  • P. × melissinum – The lemon balm pelargonium (lemon balm – Melissa officinalis). This is a hybrid between P. crispum and P. graveolens.
  • P. ‘Mint Rose’ – A minty rose-scented cultivar of P. graveolens. Similar to P. ‘Lady Plymouth’ but without the variegation of the leaves and lemony undertones.
  • P. ‘Secret Love’ – An unusual eucalyptus-scented variety of P. graveolens with pretty pale pink flowers.
  • P. ‘Van Leeni’ – A lemony rose-scented cultivar of P. graveolens, similar to P. ‘Graveolens’ and P. ‘Dr Westerland’.
Rose Geranium

Composition of Geranium Oil

Geranium oil contains about 67 compounds. The main components of geranium oil are citronellol (26.7 percent) and geraniol (13.4 percent). Other major constituents include:

  • Nerol (8.7 percent)
  • Citronellyl formate (7.1 percent)
  • Isomenthone (6.3 percent)
  • Linalool (5.2 percent)
https://www.planttherapy.com/geranium-egyptian-organic-essential-oil?v=1595

Functions

The most interesting health benefits of geranium include its ability to lower stress levels, reduce inflammation, relieve menstrual pain, strengthen the immune system, ease digestion and improve kidney, skin and hair health. It has antiseptic, antibacterial, and anti-fungal properties which help heal wounds faster.

Pelargonium graveolens is a geranium extract used in cosmetics and personal care products as a fragrance ingredient. It is cultivated in large numbers in South Africa, and known for its rose-like scent, although it is also used for other smells it imparts, including citrus, mint, coconut and nutmeg, as well as various fruits. It is sometimes known as rose geranium, old fashion rose geranium, and rose-scent geranium, according to Wikipedia. It is considered a less expensive alternative to other rose oils, and is often used in aromatherapy formulas as well.

Pelargonium graveolens has other skin care properties as well and is known to create a balance between oily and dry skin by balancing the production of sebum; this balance assists in boosting and improving the elasticity of the skin. It also stimulates the lymphatic system, releasing excess water that may be retained in the tissue. This may not only prevent cellulite but can also relieve swelling. Pelargonium graveolens also has therapeutic abilities that can calm irritated skin, clear acne, and heal bruises, burns, cuts and eczema, due to its astringent, antiseptic, tonic, antibiotic and anti-infectious properties.

Wild Geranium – ‘Cranesbill’

Uses of Geranium Oil

In aromatherapy, geranium oil is used to help treat acne, sore throats, anxiety, depression and insomnia. It is popular among women due to its rosy smell and its beneficial effect on menstruation and menopause.4 The essential oil can also aid in uplifting mood, lessening fatigue and promoting emotional wellness.

Geranium oil also functions to assist in pain reduction and inflammation. Its antiseptic properties can help speed up the healing of wounds and treat a variety of skin problems, such as burns, frostbite, fungal infections, athlete’s foot and eczema. Hemorrhoids can also be potentially treated with the use of geranium oil.

Frequent travelers can use geranium oil as a natural insect repellent. Topical application can also help heal insect bites and stop itching. It may also be used as a massage oil to help relieve aching muscles and stress. Other uses of geranium oil include:

  • Food — Geranium oil can be added to baked goods, frozen dairy, non-alcoholic and alcoholic beverages and candies.
  • Perfumery — Geranium oil has been used to create an artificial rose scent in fragrances and cosmetics.
Wild Geranium – ‘Cranesbill’

Benefits of Geranium Oil (OrganicFacts.net & Mercola.com)

Geranium essential oil provides numerous health benefits due its uses as an astringent, hemostatic, cicatrisant, diuretic and many others. Below are just some of the ways this essential oil serves both your physical and emotional health:

  • It causes your gums, muscles, intestines, skin, blood vessels and tissues to contract due to its astringent properties. It assists in preventing skin problems like sagging and wrinkling and helps give your muscles a toned appearance.
  • It contains antibacterial, antifungal and antioxidant properties. It can aid in inhibiting the bacterial strains Brevibacterium linens and Yersinia enterolitica, as well as the fungal species Aspergillus niger. It can also help prevent bacterial infections.
  • It can help eliminate the appearance of scars and dark spots by helping improve blood circulation just below the surface of the skin and helping promote an equal distribution of melanin.
  • It can help speed up the healing of wounds by triggering blood clotting. This also helps in stopping toxins from reaching your bloodstream through open wounds.
  • It assists in detoxification by increasing the rate of urination. This process of elimination does not only remove toxins from your body, but also aids in your digestive function and helps inhibit the excess gas in your intestines.
  • It can serve as a deodorant due to its fragrant scent. It can also help prevent body odor due to its antibacterial action.
  • The impact of geranium on the nervous system is well known and the plant has been used in this way for generations. If you brew the leaves of its plant, you can produce a tasty tea that has soothing properties, derived from its organic compounds that positively impact the endocrine system and help to balance hormones that cause stress and anxiety. A quick cup of tea when you’re stressed can quickly relieve unpleasant moods and a cluttered mind.
  • Although quite similar to its anti-inflammatory properties, the analgesic ability of geranium has made it a popular traditional remedy for headaches and other injuries. If you suffer from chronic pain or migraines, research has shown that its tea can release endorphins and relieve pain quite rapidly. This effect is relatively mild, and shouldn’t be relied on for permanent pain relief.
  • Geranium relieves symptoms of bronchitis, sinusitis, and nose infections because it is a powerful antiviral.
  • Geranium, being a styptic, has the ability to stop hemorrhage as it slows down blood flow by contracting the arteries and veins. It also has hemostatic properties which cause the blood to clot. This helps heal wounds faster.
  • If you’re suffering from cramping, bloating, or a generally upset stomach, drinking a cup of geranium tea can be one of the easiest and most painless remedies. The beneficial organic compounds can quickly soothe inflammation and eliminate bacteria that may be causing the discomfort, and get your gastrointestinal system back to normal!
  • Geranium is excellent for treating a range of women’s health issues from hot flashes and distress during menopause and menstrual cramps. It works two-fold, as a tonic and an antidepressant. It has been traditionally used to stabilize hormonal levels during menopause through its action on the adrenal cortex.
  • If you are looking for a natural skin cleanser and tonic, opt for geranium essential oil. It can be used directly on the skin or added to your bathwater. It helps tighten and tone the skin and keeps it blemish-free.
  • Geranium promotes hair growth because it regulates the secretion of sebum on the scalp. The essential oil can be added to either, carrier oils or shampoo. This helps give the hair a smooth sheen and a lovely, mild rose aroma.
Rose Geranium

The 17 Best Uses for Geranium Essential Oil, A-Z (TheTruthAboutCancer.com)

#1. Adrenal Health – Geranium has been used for centuries for its ability to support the adrenal glands. It acts as a tonic for the paired adrenal glands that sit atop the kidneys. In so doing, geranium may help those suffering from chronic exhaustion and fatigue.

#2. Allergies – A June 2016 Japanese study found that geranium essential oil had an inhibitory effect on cultured mast cells. These are immune cells involved with triggering allergic reactions, inflammatory conditions and autoimmune dysfunction. Geranium also inhibited tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a cell signaling protein known as a cytokine, involved in systemic inflammation. TNF is also involved in the regulation of immune cells.

#3. Anxiety, Depression, Nervous Tension – The aroma of geranium is very calming to the nervous system. It helps to relieve nervous tension, melt away anger and aggression, balances emotions, lifts the spirit, and promotes feelings of peace and well-being.

#4. Blood Sugar Problems – Geranium is held in high esteem in Tunisia and is much studied there for its ability to decrease blood glucose levels. Animal studies reported in 2012  revealed that serum glucose levels were significantly decreased in diabetic rats and much more effective than glibenclamide, an antidiabetic drug. Hopefully studies will continue and humans will be included!

Rose Geranium

#5. Brain Clarity & Concentration – Geranium helps to improve cognitive function and improves concentration. It is even being studied for its ability to prevent neurodegenerative disorders such as dementia and Alzheimer’s.

#6. Cancer – Geranium has long been used by natural healers for its anti-tumoral properties. One 2002 study found that geraniol had anti-proliferative effects (proliferation is the ability of cancer cells to spread) and, when combined with the chemotherapy drug 5-fluorouracil, had twice the cancer-killing action of  5-fluorouracil alone in cultured colon cancer cells. Several of the researchers in that study released a subsequent study in 2004 showing this combination also worked in mice. Researchers observed a 53% reduction in tumor size using the combination of 5-fluorouracil and geraniol.

A Chinese study reported in 2012 stated that the combination of geranium and several traditional Chinese herbs greatly assisted breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiation. The geranium/herb combination was found to delay or slow the associated reduction of leukocytes (white blood cells involved in immune function) for women receiving chemotherapy and/or radiation.

Research released in May 2016 revealed that citronellol can be used in an interesting way. Researchers combined citronellol with the anti-cancer drug cabazitaxel, a taxane used to fight prostate cancer. The combination (called a conjugate self-assembled nanoparticle, or CSNP) improved the drug’s ability to accumulate at the site of a tumor. Researchers said this method was an effective antitumoral, in vitro (test tube).

Rose Geranium

#7. Candida – Because of its strong anti-fungal properties, geranium has been investigated for candida sufferers. Research reported in 2008 found that of three essential oils studied, geranium was the most effective in combination with Amphotericin B, an antifungal drug, against 11 strains of candida. Geranium helps the antifungal drugs work better and they appear to have a synergistic effect. Another study reported in 2008 on mice found that geranium oil suppressed candida cell growth in the vagina.

#8. Cold Sores (Herpes Simplex) – Due to its anti-viral qualities, geranium essential oil is excellent for helping to heal cold sores. It will reduce the pain and size of a cold sore quickly.

#9. Golden Staph and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) – A research study reported in 2012 demonstrated that geranium has excellent antimicrobial properties against Staphylococcus aureus (“golden staph”) and even methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus. Indeed, the author’s own mother-in-law was diagnosed with MRSA several years ago. Geranium essential oil was one of several essential oils used topically (on the skin), instead of the antibiotic drugs given to her by the doctor. It completely healed the MRSA in what her doctor called “record time.”

#10. Hair and Scalp Health – Geranium has been used traditionally for decades for hair regrowth. It is known to nourish and tone the scalp. Geranium works on the sebaceous (oil) glands of the scalp, regulating the secretion of sebum. This helps to balance both dry and oily scalps, resulting in smooth and silky hair.

#11. Hemorrhoids – The astringent properties of geranium can help to shrink and heal swollen tissue, and ease the pain of hemorrhoids.

Rose Geranium

#12. Inflammatory Conditions – Geranium, and geraniol in particular, has been widely studied for its anti-inflammatory properties. 2014 research indicated geraniol increased interleukin-10 production, which is an anti-inflammatory cytokine. Because inflammation is involved in many disease processes, from arthritis to hemorrhoids to cancer, geranium essential oil is very useful indeed.

#13. Insect Repellent – Bugs don’t like geranium! It is an excellent insect deterrent. Going hiking? Take your geranium essential oil along. 2013 research found that the phytochemical 10-epi-gamma-eudesmol in geranium was just as effective as DEET against ticks.

Even dust mites don’t like geranium. 2008 research found that geraniol and beta-citronellol out-performed DEET and benzyl benzoate (two common chemically-derived mite and lice deterrents, both with side effects) for controlling dust mites. The beta-citronellol component makes geranium very effective for repelling mosquitoes as well. Several research papers investigating effective botanical insecticides have explored this and other essential oils for their ability to kill mosquito larvae.

#14. Shingles – Research released in 2003 found that application of geranium oil was helpful for relieving nerve pain caused by shingles (herpes zoster). Being a good anti-viral, geranium also helps to speed the healing of shingles.

Rose Geranium

#15. Skin Health, Scars, and Regeneration – Due to its potent anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, and antioxidant properties, geranium has been used for centuries in skin tonics, lotions, moisturizers, and balms for such conditions as dermatitis, eczema, psoriasis, oily skin, and acne. It is balancing to the skin’s production of oil and superb for fading scars.

#16. Urinary Tract Infections – 2011 research examined the effect of geranium oil combined with ciprofloxacin, a commonly used drug for treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Researchers found that the oil/drug combo worked synergistically to effectively kill the bacteria causing UTIs.

#17. Wound Healing – Geranium is a natural styptic − it helps to stop the flow of blood. Geranium also speeds wound healing by triggering blood clotting. This process, together with its natural antiseptic action, keeps harmful bacteria from reaching the bloodstream via open wounds and cuts.

Wild Geranium – ‘Cranesbill’

Safety Measures/Side Effects

Pelargonium graveolens is considered a safe and natural ingredient that is repeatedly listed as non-toxic, non-irritant and generally non-sensitizing. The Cosmetics Database finds it to be 99% safe and lists data gaps as the only concern.

However, it may cause allergies and sensitivities in some people. If you’re looking for essential oils that offer the same therapeutic benefits as geranium oil does, your options include lavender oil, orange oil, lemon oil and jasmine oil. To be on the safe side, consult your physician before using any essential oils for medicinal purposes.

Geranium infused oil

How to Make Geranium Oil Infusion

Geranium essential oil is extracted through steam distillation of the plant’s stems and leaves. When made from young, green leaves, geranium oil appears with a lemon scent. However, if extracted from older leaves that have changed their color, the oil will have a strong rose fragrance. While geranium oil is available in stores, it is possible to create a homemade oil infusion.

What You Need:

  • Geranium leaves
  • Mortar and pestle
  • Carrier oil like jojoba oil
  • Large jar with lid
  • Small jars or bottles with lids
  • Strainer
  • Cheesecloth

Procedure:

  • Remove the leaves from a geranium plant (more leaves mean more oil produced).
  • Remove pests, dirt and other debris from the leaves by washing them in cold water.
  • Dry the leaves by gently patting them with a cloth or paper towel.
  • Using the mortar and pestle, ground the leaves until they are completely mashed and pulpy. Leave the crushed leaves for a few hours.
  • Afterward, transfer the ground leaves to the large jar. Pour some of the carrier oil — just enough to cover the leaves. Then, seal the jar and place it in a cool, dry spot. Set aside for two weeks.
  • Once the two weeks are up, check the scent of the oil. You may add more ground leaves to make the scent stronger and set aside for another week. If the fragrance is too strong, just add some oil to dilute the finished product.
  • To store, pour the geranium oil into the small sterilized jars or bottles through a strainer lined with a cheesecloth. This will separate the crushed leaves from the oil. Once the oil has been transferred, seal the bottles/jars and store them in a cool, dry place.
Pink Geranium

Homemade Conditioner

This homemade conditioner recipe is awesome, for it helps to restore the hairs natural pH, thus rehydrating the hair. The result is soft, luscious and healthy hair. Add 10 drops of geranium oil and see how it helps to condition your dry hair.

 Total Time: 2 minutes  Uses: 20–30

 INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 cup water
  • 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 10 drops of essential oils
  • BPA-free plastic bottles or glass bottle with dispenser

 Customize Your Conditioner:

  • Rosemary or sage essential oils for all types of hair
  • Lemon, bergamot or tea tree essential oils for oily hair
  • Lavender, sandalwood or geranium essential oils for dry hair or dandruff

DIRECTIONS:

  • Mix ingredients together in eight-ounce spray bottle
  • Shake bottle before using and then spray hair
  • Leave in hair for five minutes, then rinse

Tips for Using Geranium Essential Oil

A) Massage geranium into the skin and muscles of the back, especially mid-back and just over the bottom of the rib cage (over area of the kidneys). Use an organic carrier oil like jojoba, almond, coconut, hemp, or argan to dilute if desired or if you have sensitive skin.

B) Drip 1-2 drops of oil into your hands and make a tent over your nose and mouth (avoid the eyes), breathe in deeply for a couple of minutes.

C) Using an ultrasonic cool mist diffuser, diffuse several drops of geranium into a room where you intend to sit for an hour or so.

D) Massage oil into the soles of the feet. They have the largest pores in the body and the oil will be in the bloodstream and working in just a few minutes. This method works especially well if digestion is impaired.

E) Gently massage oil into the sides of the neck, overlying the carotid arteries, diluting as described in A above if needed. Also massage into the back of the neck just under the base of the skull.

F) Geranium essential oil is generally regarded as safe for human consumption by the United States Food & Drug Administration (FDA). To take orally, put 1 drop of oil in 3-4 ounces (about 100 ml) of liquid such as almond or rice milk. It can also be combined with 1 teaspoon of honey. Avoid for children under 5 years of age.

G) Massage geranium oil into the abdomen and lower back.

H) Rub a drop of geranium on the affected area, being careful to dilute if you have sensitive skin. If using as an insect repellent, rub geranium into exposed skin.

I) Add a drop or two of geranium oil to one teaspoon of jojoba oil and pat it on topically. Use a small amount of gauze if you wish to hold it in place.

J) Add a drop or two of geranium to your favorite organic personal care products like cleanser, body wash, moisturizer, toner, shampoo, or conditioner.

Wild Geranium – ‘Cranesbill’

Important Precautions When Using Essential Oils

If you intend to use geranium essential oil medicinally, please do your homework and work with a qualified healthcare practitioner who is well versed in essential oil usage.

  • Be aware that quality of essential oils varies widely. Find out whether or not your essential oil supplier uses organic growing methods, and knows how to properly distill the oils. Always buy your oils from a trusted source because if they are not organically grown or properly distilled they may be adulterated with toxic chemicals that will not help to heal you… and may indeed cause harm.
  • Do not apply essential oils anywhere near eyes, ears, or sensitive regions of the body.
  • If you have sensitive skin, be sure to dilute essential oils first. If you are unsure, do a patch test on a small area of skin just inside the elbow. You may want to dilute essential oils with an organic carrier oil such as jojoba, almond, coconut, hemp, or argan.
  • Be cautious when using essential oils with children and in pregnancy. Always dilute essential oils for children. Some oils need to be avoided during pregnancy. When in doubt, work with an experienced expert in essential oils.
  • It is not recommended to use any essential oil by itself as a sole treatment for cancer, or for any other health issues mentioned above. When used in combination with other treatments, both conventional and alternative, essential oils can be very effective in assisting the healing process.

References:

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pelargonium_graveolens
  2. https://www.truthinaging.com/ingredients/pelargonium-graveolens
  3. https://plants.usda.gov/core/profile?symbol=PEGR11
  4. https://articles.mercola.com/herbal-oils/geranium-oil.aspx
  5. http://www.reherb.eu/en/content/pelargonium-graveolens
  6. https://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Pelargonium+graveolens
  7. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4312398/
  8. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3641007/
  9. http://ageless.co.za/rose_scented_geranium.htm
  10. http://www.academicjournals.org/journal/JMPR/article-full-text-pdf/054149D15942
  11. https://hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/med-aro/factsheets/GERANIUM.html
  12. https://thetruthaboutcancer.com/geranium-essential-oil/
  13. http://nopr.niscair.res.in/bitstream/123456789/33014/1/IJTK%2014(4)%20558-563.pdf
  14. http://essentialoils.co.za/essential-oils/rose-geranium.htm
  15. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/283051914_An_overview_on_phytopharmacology_of_Pelargonium_graveolens_L
  16. https://draxe.com/10-geranium-oils-benefits-healthy-skin-much/
  17. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3793238/
  18. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25514231
  19. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18670079
  20. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23401038
  21. http://www.acanceresearch.com/cancer-research/pelargonium-graveolens-rose-geranium–a-novel-therapeutic-agent-for-antibacterial-antioxidant-antifungal-and-diabetics.pdf
  22. https://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-153-rose%20geranium%20oil.aspx?activeingredientid=153&activeingredientname=rose%20geranium%20oil
  23. http://arnoldia.arboretum.harvard.edu/pdf/articles/1974-34-3-aromatic-pelargoniums.pdf
  24. https://www.cabdirect.org/cabdirect/abstract/20013071662
  25. https://www.hchs.edu/sites/default/files/files/Geranium%20article.pdf
  26. http://japsonline.com/admin/php/uploads/1200_pdf.pdf
  27. https://www.naturalbynature.co.uk/organic-geranium
  28. https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/agricultural-and-biological-sciences/geranium
  29. https://www.newdirectionsaromatics.com/blog/products/all-about-geranium-oil.html
  30. http://www.essencejournal.com/pdf/2014/vol2issue2/PartA/2-2-8-979.pdf
  31. http://www.doctorsbeyondmedicine.com/listing/candida-geranium-oil
  32. http://www.globalsciencebooks.info/Online/GSBOnline/images/2010/MAPSB_4(SI1)/MAPSB_4(SI1)77-79o.pdf
  33. https://www.rxlist.com/rose_geranium_oil/supplements.htm
  34. https://lipidworld.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1476-511X-12-30
  35. http://www.worldresearchlibrary.org/up_proc/pdf/420-147558255618-21.pdf
  36. http://ijm.tums.ac.ir/index.php/ijm/article/download/681.pdf/451
  37. http://www.worldresearchlibrary.org/up_proc/pdf/420-147558255618-21.pdf
  38. http://www.theresearchpedia.com/health/aromatherapy/health-benefits-of-geranium-essential-oil

Heal With Color

Healing With Color

In my last article, Color in Marketing, we learned about how corporations use color to affect our emotions and our choices. We gained an understanding that it is much more than a whim when you purchase something without thinking. Your reactions are guided by the colors chosen. So now we’ll look at how you can use color to your advantage and protect and heal yourself.

How Colors Affect Us

  • Color is one of the languages of the soul, just look at inspired or meditative paintings.
  • They influence our mood and emotions.
  • They have their impact on our sense of well-being or un-easiness.
  • Using and avoiding certain colors is a way of self-expression; it sheds light on our personality.
  • Colors affect our way of perception (light colors make a space look big, a high ceiling looks less high when painted in a dark color, etc.)
  • Colors have a symbolic meaning which is immediately recognized by our subconsciousness. It must be said that not all colors mean the same to all persons and all cultures.
  • They influence the flow and amount of energy in our bodies.
  • Colors tell something about biological attraction and sexual availability.

Chromotherapy

Color Therapy is the method of treating ailments through the use of color. Chromotherapy can be done by shining an appropriate color on an area of the body. It can also be done through the eyes by looking at a particular color, though this should be done with the utmost care to avoid any strain on the eyes. It is a complementary therapy and should not be used as an alternative to professional medical care. Its results vary and cannot be guaranteed – its efficacy will in large part be dependent on the individual.

How Color Healing Therapy Works

Healing with color is simple, it comprises of applying single or multiple colors using their vibrational energy to heal. When embarking on self-healing with color, a good rule of thumb to remember is: “Energy follows thought”, in other words where you concentrate your thoughts is where the energy will go. Therefore, by concentrating on a particular healing color through visualization for instance, the energy of that color will be projected by your thoughts. The “unbalanced” vibration in your body will begin to change and start to resonate with your particular chosen healing color.

https://steemkr.com/colors/@gabriel0/guide-to-healing-colors

Healing Colors

  • Red: is a passionate and warm color which induces vitality and stimulates energy. It increases adrenaline and elevates blood pressure-so avoid using it when the patient is suffering from hypertension. Bright crimson red is even a more potent stimulator than orange. This should not be given to anyone on the head. But if really concentrated on to rheumatic joints it will be beneficial. This could be the reason why red is used only moderately in hospitals. At home though, you can use this color for stimulating appetite in weak patients. Red can also alleviate depression. It is one of the top healing colors for enhancing sexual appetite and overall vitality. As the light frequencies of red are slow and very long, they have high penetrating properties, therefore can be used to stimulate the aura (and physical body) to such an extent that circulatory blockages can be cleared.
  • Orange: According to color healing therapy, orange is one of the best colors for hospitals and particularly for children’s rooms. Orange radiates warmth and is associated with joy and happiness. This is a stimulating color which can be given to the spleen, liver, kidneys, heart and indeed to any organ which helps to promote good circulation. In fact: even oranges which are packed with Vitamin C-the powerful antioxidant- are known to heal and fight free radicals to boost immunity. Therefore, as far as cancer healing colors go, orange is an important color in the color healing chart.
  • Yellow: Search for healing colors for hospitals and yellow would be high up in the list. This bright and cheerful color can help stimulate intelligence and also detoxify the body and mind to heal patients quickly. Yellow is particularly recommended for patients with skin problems. It can inspire creativity in people who feel sluggish or lethargic. Yellow is the color which signifies wisdom. Any mental deficiency, no matter how it shows itself, will be relieved by the use of yellow if concentrated on to small areas of the body. Avoid overuse of yellow as it can hamper the digestive health and lead to stomach problems and insomnia.
  • Green: known for its balanced healing properties. It is a restful color that symbolizes growth and renewal. It also encourages comfort and equilibrium and is particularly beneficial for the heart, lungs and circulatory system. This green is the great color of balance, which harmonizes the flow of prana or universal life force, throughout the psychic centers. It operates, as do all other colors, firstly on the aura, the reflection of which reacts upon the physical body. As green is the great balancer and harmonizer it causes many people to become very relaxed. It tends to counteract subtle energies which have built up in one nerve ganglia and causing starvation of another nerve ganglia. Start your treatment with an application of green and always finish with an application of green.
  • Blue: This spiritual color is also the color of the sky and sea. Blue is an important healing color as it is linked with calm and serenity. It helps lower blood pressure and can reduce rapid heart rate. Blue is relaxing for the mind and body. It is associated with organs like eyes, ears and nose and involved with the senses of smell, sight and sound. If you are sensitive that you are liable to get physically cold under the application of a blue light. This is caused because the high vibrations are short and quick, and they manifest as cold rather than heat. From this you can see that orange and red produce heat and are therefore necessary in cases of low temperature; blue produces coldness and is therefore necessary in cases of high temperature. Blue causes most people to relax. An application of blue color vibrations will also help people to sleep who suffer with mild insomnia.
  • Pink: feminine yet a soothing color that shows caring and affection. It is a protective and compassionate color that heals and soothes. This lighthearted color can stimulate happiness. Too much of bright pink might stimulate energy and incite passionate behavior just like its distant cousin Red. Pink can be however be safely useful in hospitals and prisons to reduce erratic behavior.
  • Purple/Violet: Both, purple and violet, as well as its related shades like lilac and lavender are connected with spirituality. These healing colors are also linked with perception, higher consciousness and insight. Health wise, these colors are linked with the cerebral and nervous systems. Violet tends to bring great relaxation and also like blue, can often be felt as waves of coldness. It does not stimulate basic circulation, but it does stimulate the flow of the subtler energies throughout the psychic centers and the nervous system. Because of this it is especially beneficial when used on the forehead and neck.
  • Indigo: a great purifier of the bloodstream and also benefits mental problems. It is a freeing and purifying agent. Indigo combines the deep blue of devotion with a trace of stabilizing and objective red. Indigo is cool, electric, and astringent. It is, also, the color ray used by Spirit to help entrance a medium. Indigo links with and stimulates the brow chakra (third eye) and controls the pineal gland. It governs both physical and spiritual (not psychic) perception; that is, clairvoyance, clairaudience, and clairsentience. Thus, it can be of great assistance in dealing with ailments of the eyes and ears, as well as assisting in problems or conditions related to mediumship. Finally, indigo is considered the ray of the Holy Spirit.
  • White: the perfect color; for it is all color, in perfect balance and harmony. It is the color of the awakened Spirit; the light of perfection; the light of the Christ and Buddhic consciousness. It is also the Divine Light. Just about everyone has heard of surrounding people with the “White Light of Healing and Protection.” Directing white into the aura helps stimulate the person’s own divine nature into healing the self.
  • Brown: absorbs pain and sorrow, increases physical energy and primal strength, relieves disorders connected with feet, he legs, the hands, the skeleton, all back pain and also the large intestine.

Table of Color Healing Properties – Physical

ColorPhysical Ailment
VioletLapse of cellular memory, negative emotions accumulated since birth.
IndigoEyes, headaches, nightmares, memory lapse, bleeding.
BlueThroat, ears, arms, hands, mouth, thyroid, neck, bleeding, burns and swellings.
GreenHeart, lungs, arms, hands, skin, asthma, high blood pressure.
YellowMuscles, digestion, ulcers, diabetes, Hypoglycemic.
OrangeProstate gland, testes, womb, kidneys, bladder, impotence, frigidity.
RedLegs, bones, large intestine, constipation, genitals, hemorrhoids, coldness, acne.
TurquoiseImmune system, bronchitis, influenza, rash, epilepsy.
WhiteEndocrine system, eye balls, other undetected ailments.

Color breathing and meditation for healing: simple yet powerful color healing and color breathing meditation to gain benefits of color healing therapy.

  • Sit outside in a chair or on the ground in sunshine.
  • Close your eyes and count slowly as you breathe in.
  • Hold the breath as you count slowly to 8 counts.
  • Repeat this until your mind automatically quiets down and ponders over the healing harmony of colors that you receive from the sun’s rays.
  • You can easily and gently try to focus your mind on the place between the eyebrows. This is the third eye center where the pituitary body is located. This little gland can increase your perception and sixth sense. Now let colors flood the entire body and mind.
  • Repeat the exercise several times a day until you start to see Auras.

There are many colors that help healing but the colors described above are proven to work through every cell of the body even exert influence on the soul, consciousness and spirit. Use these healing colors wisely and bring peace, joy and vitality in you and your loved ones.

Ways to Apply Color for Healing

  1. On the subtler planes by the power of thought, by visualizing a color in your mind.
  2. With colored lights applied to the physical body.
  3. With colored stones applied directly to the body or held in the hand.
  4. With colored paper set directly in your line of sight, gazing at gently to avoid eyestrain. Or place a colored cloth over a lamp shade to make the whole room that color, just don’t start a fire.
  5. Set the color you choose on your desktop or phone. Focus on the color to absorb its healing energy.

Colors are a major healing force. They stimulate energies that support the entire energy system and a clear mind. They bring in a subtle substance to the cells and tissues of the body. The color of the mind amplifies mental understanding and clarity, making possible the integration of thoughts with the vast knowledge of the soul. The color of the physical body and brain also bring healing to the physical body. All seven colors emanate from the one primary color of this Solar system, indigo/sapphire blue. The soul of each individual functions on one of the seven rays, and each ray has its own color.

Contact Healing with Crystals

For healing choose smooth polished stones about the size of a large coin. Use an counter-clockwise movement to remove pain and clockwise to infuse the body with healing energies.

Crystal quartz: will unblock stagnant energies; infuse the body with energy and positive feelings into a person who is ill or sad. Clear quartz will also trigger the body’s immune system and innate regenerative powers. This crystal is for fast results and can substitute for any other crystal

Citrine: This is a sparking yellow sun crystal that is naturally warming and energizing but is gentler than clear quartz. Melting pain and tension, citrine fills you or the patient with a slow even flow of warming energies that will create a sense of well-being and rebalance the body. It is ideal for chronic conditions or where a patient is weakened or distressed

Rose Quartz or Amethyst: These pink or purple transparent crystals have similar properties and are both excellent for use with children, older people and animals. They are also helpful where calm, quiet-acting energies are necessary to soothe and harmonize a body that is over–stressed and a mind that is over-active. They will remove pain and problems caused by tension, hormonal swings or emotional crises that give rise to physical symptoms.

C. W. Leadbeater in “Inner Life,” Vol. 1, page 447-460 describes the colors and petals of each energy center in the human as follows:

  1. The base of the spine, four petals. These petals are in the shape of a cross, and radiate with orange fire.
  2. The solar plexus, ten petals, rosy color with admixture of green.
  3. The heart center, twelve petals glowing golden.
  4. The throat center, sixteen petals of a silvery blue, with blue predominating.
  5. The head center in its twofold divisions:
    • Between the eyebrows, consisting of ninety-six petals, one-half of the lotus being rose and yellow, and the other half blue and purple.
    • The very top of the head. A center consisting of twelve major petals of white and gold, and nine hundred and sixty secondary petals arranged around the central twelve.

When your body is purified, and its energies rightly directed, and when the rhythm of the soul is achieved, a radiant life is created. This works out literally as the life currents are directed by the soul through your nervous system and circulatory system.

https://www.coschedule.com

References:

  1. http://www.fengshuidana.com/2015/07/08/healing-colors-your-bright-life/
  2. http://www.chakraboosters.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Chakra-Chart-Master-1224-wide.jpg
  3. https://hubpages.com/health/A-Simple-Guide-To-Colour-Therapy-And-Healing-With-Color
  4. https://hubpages.com/health/How-to-Use-Color-Therapy-to-Relieve-Stress
  5. https://www.color-meanings.com/7-best-colors-healing/
  6. http://www.healing-journeys-energy.com/healing-with-color.html
  7. http://www.deeptrancenow.com/colortherapy.htm
  8. https://www.aetherius.org/healing-yourself-and-others/color-therapy/
  9. http://www.crystalinks.com/colors.html
  10. https://pathoflight.com/color-test-healing
  11. https://pathoflight.com/products/books.html
  12. http://www.cassandraeason.com/healing/healing_colours.htm