Moving to Keep Moving

Regular exercise is essential to maintaining functional abilities throughout aging. Once we stop moving our muscles weaken and our joints become stiff and inflexible. The more sedentary we become the more we have to do to reverse the effects. Avoid being completely sedentary by moving at least a little every day.

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These are common barriers to exercise that we can overcome.

Self-efficacyBegin slowly with exercises that are easily accomplished; advance gradually; provide frequent encouragement.
AttitudePromote positive personal benefits of exercise; identify enjoyable activities.
DiscomfortVary intensity and range of exercise; employ cross-training; start slowly; avoid overdoing.
DisabilitySpecialized exercises; consider personal trainer or physical therapist.
Poor balanceAssistive devices can increase safety as well as increase exercise intensity.
Fear of injuryBalance and strength training initially; use of appropriate clothing, equipment, and supervision; start slowly.
HabitIncorporate into daily routine; repeat encouragement; promote active lifestyle.
Subjective normsIdentify and recruit influential others; education of patient and influential family/friends.
Fixed incomeWalking and other simple exercises; use of household items; promote active lifestyle.
Bad weatherWalk around the home; use senior centers; promote active lifestyle
Cognitive declineIncorporate into daily routine; keep exercises simple.
Illness/ fatigueUse a range of exercises/intensities that patients can match to their varying energy level.
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Moderate exercise for 30 minutes a day has these health benefits:

  • Improves blood circulation, which reduces the risk of heart disease
  • Keeps weight under control
  • Helps in the battle to quit smoking
  • Improves blood cholesterol levels
  • Prevents and manages high blood pressure
  • Helps delay or prevent chronic illnesses and diseases associated with aging
  • Maintains quality of life and independence longer for seniors
  • Helps you fall asleep faster and sleep more soundly
  • Increases muscle strength, increasing the ability to do other physical activities
  • Prevents bone loss
  • Boosts energy level
  • Helps manage stress and releases tension
  • Counters anxiety and depression
  • Improves self-image
  • Promotes enthusiasm and optimism
  • Reduces risk of stroke by 20 percent
  • Counters the conditions that lead to heart attack and stroke
  • Provides a way to share an activity with family and friends
  • Reduces coronary heart disease in women by 30-40 percent
  • Reduces the overall risk of obesity, high blood pressure, poor cholesterol levels, etc.
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Finding Balance with Holiday Eating

We all tend to eat too much for the holidays. One way to counteract our increased calorie consumption is to exercise more (burn more calories).

This can be beneficial, yet if you’ve seen the latest research you will know that calories are not the issue. Macronutrient composition is the issue. To put it plainly, we are getting to many simple carbohydrates and not enough healthy fats.

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So finding balance with Holiday eating is essential to minimize weight gain and maintain digestive health throughout the Holidays.

I would never recommend avoiding certain foods because that leads to uncontrollable cravings. Which make weight loss even harder.

Simply try to put fewer simple carbohydrates (pie, bread, pastries, jellies, marshmallows) on your plate and more complex carbohydrates (rice, potatoes, sweet potatoes, quinoa) and more healthy fats (avocado, walnuts & pecans, sunflower & pumpkin seeds, turkey & ham, olive oil).

Following the One-Hand Rule can be very helpful as well. This is filling your plate while considering the size of your stomach. Basically, your stomach is the size of both of your fists together.

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So when you fill your plate consider a serving to be 1/4 to 1/2 the size of your fist. If you have 8 different foods to try then place 1/4 fist size of each so you can try them all. Or if you have 4 foods to try then they would each be 1/2 fist size servings.

This is a very simple method to control your eating without weighing, calculating or measuring.

Why We Should Avoid Petrolatum

White Petrolatum – By Kiyok – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2647443

What is Petroleum Jelly or Petrolatum?

Petroleum jelly is a byproduct of the oil refining process. This means it is not sustainable or eco-friendly, and it also explains some of the potential problems with using it. Petroleum jelly was originally found in the bottom of oil rigs and is further refined for use in the beauty industry. According to packaging and safety info, all of the harmful components are removed before use in beauty or personal care products, but some sources argue that it still contains some harmful components (like hydrocarbons).

Petrolatum, commonly known as petroleum jelly, is a byproduct of petroleum refining. Petrolatum is a soft paraffin or wax mixture sold as a topical skin ointment. It is acknowledged by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as an approved over-the-counter skin protectant and is used in the manufacturing of cosmetic skin care.

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Petroleum jelly, petrolatum, white petrolatum, soft paraffin/paraffin wax or multi-hydrocarbon, CAS number 8009-03-8, is a semi-solid mixture of hydrocarbons (with carbon numbers mainly higher than 25), originally promoted as a topical ointment for its healing properties.

The Environmental Working Group (EWG), a U.S. non-profit organization that does environmental and safety studies, says there’s petrolatum in one out of every 14 cosmetic products on the market, including 15 percent of lipsticks and 40 percent of baby lotions and oils. Plus, it is used as an active ingredient for healing cuts and burns.

The EWG says ’and governments and the CCTFA acknowledge’ there is a risk of contamination from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), cancer-causing chemicals found in crude oil and its by-products. While no studies have ever shown a direct link between petrolatum and cancer, the European Union put numerous grades of petrolatum on a list of dangerous substances. Only highly refined petrolatum can be used in cosmetics there.

How Does Petroleum Jelly Work on Skin?

Petroleum jelly is used in everything from lotions to baby products for its ability to create a protective barrier on the skin and hold in moisture. On labels, it may also appear as Petrolatum, Mineral oil, Liquid paraffin, or Paraffin oil.

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While the ability to hold in moisture may seem like a good thing, it can have its downsides as well. Since petroleum jelly is both waterproof and not water soluble, it creates a waterproof barrier on the skin. At first glance, this may sound good, but it also means that it blocks pores and can lock in residue and bacteria. This is also the reason petroleum jelly should not be used on a burn or sunburn, as it locks in heat and can block the body’s ability to heal.

Also, while it certainly gives the appearance of hydrated and moisturized skin, this may be an illusion as there is nothing in petroleum jelly that is actually nourishing the skin.

Petroleum jelly can’t be metabolized by the skin and just sits as a barrier until it wears off. This means that the body isn’t able to gain any benefit from petroleum jelly (like it can from nutrient rich substances like shea butter or cocoa butter), and there is concern that some of the components (like hydrocarbons) may be stored in fat tissue within the body.

There is strong evidence that mineral oil hydrocarbons are the greatest contaminant of the human body, amounting to approximately 1 g per person. Possible routes of contamination include air inhalation, food intake, and dermal absorption.

This suggests the potential for long-term accumulation of these hydrocarbons in the body. The study found no link between nutritional habits and hydrocarbon levels in the body but did find a strong potential link between cosmetic and beauty product use and contamination, suggesting that beauty products may be a major source of hydrocarbon exposure.

As moms, this study is especially interesting, since it shows the potential for passing on these contaminants to our children during breastfeeding. We also know that we can’t metabolize these substances, so they can build up in the body and are difficult to remove.

Collagen Breakdown

Because of the barrier that mineral oil/petroleum jelly creates on the skin, there is also some concern about its potential to cause collagen breakdown (which is the opposite of what most women want!). Essentially, the concern is that when petroleum jelly coats the skin it blocks the skin’s natural ability to breathe and absorb nutrients. This can slow the cell renewal process and cause the skin to pull the necessary moisture and nutrients from within, leading to collagen breakdown over time (aka wrinkles!).

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Estrogen Dominance

A growing problem in today’s world, estrogen dominance is when the body has high levels of estrogen and proportionately low levels of progesterone to balance it. It is linked to infertility, menstrual problems, accelerated aging, allergies and autoimmune problems as well as nutrient deficiencies, sleep problems and even some types of cancers.

Many products (including petroleum jelly) contain chemicals called xenoestrogens which may increase estrogen problems in the body. Studies have shown that these chemicals may act on hormone receptors in the body and lead to estrogen dominance.

Does it heal skin?

While some beauty companies are promoting petrolatum alternatives, other manufacturers swear by its ability to moisturize and heal. Petrolatum seals off the skin from water and air, as it allows the skin to heal itself.

But there’s a potential downside. A study that was published in Pediatrics in 2000 found that extremely-low-birth-weight infants treated with petroleum jelly were more likely to develop systemic candidiasis; it created a warm, moist place for fungi to grow.

Petrolatum is an occlusive barrier, locking in moisture but it does not allow moisture to be absorbed from the atmosphere. For example, lip balms with petrolatum and other petrochemicals can be less moisturizing than those with emollients that enable moisture exchange.

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Alternatives to Petroleum Based Products for the Skin

Thankfully, there are many great alternatives to petroleum jelly and mineral oil that help increase moisture on the skin and provide nourishment as well. The best part? Most of them can be used alone and you don’t even have to make anything!

Looking for a simple alternative to petroleum jelly or petrolatum? Try Mother Jai’s Moisturizer. Simply all natural with Coconut, Olive and Sunflower Oils. A little goes a long way.

Shea Butter– A natural skin superfood that is high in Vitamins A, E and F. It also contains beneficial fatty acids that nourish skin and it may reduce skin inflammation and increase collagen production. It is excellent on its own or in homemade beauty products.

Cocoa Butter-A great source of antioxidants and beneficial fatty acids, cocoa butter is another great product for skin. There is even some evidence that it may reduce the signs of aging.

Beeswax– A great substitute for the waterproof and protective properties of petroleum jelly without the hydrocarbons. Though not usually used alone, beeswax can be blended into homemade beauty products for its skin-protective ability and is especially good in lip balms and body creams.

Coconut Oil– Coconut oil has so many benefits, internal and external, and it can be great for the skin. It does cause breakouts in some people, so I always suggest testing on a small area of skin first, but it is a source of skin-nourishing fatty acids, lauric acid and anti-inflammatory compounds.

Almond Oil– A liquid oil that is fragrance free and nourishing to skin.

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Sunflower Oil – Another liquid oil that is full of nutrients like omega fatty acids and minerals that are essential to skin health.

Jojoba Oil – A perfect choice for skin care because it naturally resembles sebum, the oily substance naturally produced by the body to nourish and protect skin. You can mix jojoba oil into shea butter for a natural lotion.

References:

  1. https://wellnessmama.com/61770/petroleum-jelly/
  2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petroleum_jelly
  3. www.livestrong.com/article/226763-side-effects-of-petrolatum/
  4. www.safecosmetics.org/get-the-facts/chemicals-of-concern/petrolatum/
  5. http://www.besthealthmag.ca/best-looks/skin/the-truth-about-petrolatum/
  6. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/21/vaseline-petroleum-jelly_n_4136226.html
  7. https://www.healthline.com/health/beauty-skin-care/petroleum-jelly
  8. https://beautyeditor.ca/2014/10/16/petroleum-mineral-oil-skin-products
  9. http://www.berkeleywellness.com/self-care/over-counter-products/article/petroleum-jelly-safe
  10. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/019096229270060S
  11. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S092318111200031X
  12. https://www.jacionline.org/article/S0091-6749(15)01194-X/fulltext
  13. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4885180/
  14. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6477564/
  15. https://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0365-05962018000200238
  16. http://www.safecosmetics.org/get-the-facts/chemicals-of-concern/petrolatum/
  17. https://jpet.aspetjournals.org/content/78/1/65
  18. https://www.aad.org/news/petroleum-jelly-for-skin-care
  19. https://davidsuzuki.org/queen-of-green/dirty-dozen-petrolatum/
  20. https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fphar.2020.00785/full
  21. https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamadermatology/fullarticle/519971
  22. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00032719.2016.1153647?scroll=top&needAccess=true
  23. https://www.berkeleywellness.com/self-care/over-counter-products/article/petroleum-jelly-safe