Avoiding Toothpaste

What’s in Your Toothpaste?

When it comes to toothpaste, buyer beware. It is not regulated by the FDA because it is considered a cosmetic product. Even though it goes in your mouth! Companies do not have to list all of the ingredients in their products, nor are they required to register their manufacturing facilities with the government or report “adverse events,” making it difficult for regulators to spot potential problems. Essentially, the cosmetics industry regulates itself.

The Cornucopia Institute is chartered as a tax-exempt public charity focusing on research and education. Cornucopia aims to empower organic producers, consumers, and wholesale buyers to make discerning marketplace decisions protecting the credibility of the organic food and farming movement and the value it delivers to society. They have provided some great information on personal hygiene products.

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Is it time to reduce chemicals in your environment? Removing these products from your home is a huge step. Don’t believe me? Read your labels and see what you are ingesting multiple times a day.

The Cornucopia Institute’s research on toothpaste uncovered some interesting information:

  • When potentially toxic chemical ingredients are present in toothpaste and mouthwash, they are likely to pass directly and quickly into the bloodstream, even if the toothpaste is not swallowed. This is because the membrane lining of the mouth (oral mucosa) has an absorption efficiency of more than 90%, according to the Physician’s Desk reference Handbook.
  • A label containing the word “natural” does not necessarily mean a toothpaste is free of potentially harmful ingredients.
  • Some prominent “natural” brands are manufactured by companies that primarily sell mass-marketed brands. For example, Tom’s of Maine is owned by Colgate-Palmolive, the company that also makes Colgate toothpaste.
  • Toothpastes sold in Europe have different, safer formulations than the same products, made by the same companies sold in the U.S., to accommodate stricter EU cosmetics laws.
  • The American Dental Association is heavily subsidized by the cosmetic industry, creating a conflict of interest. Its seal does not guarantee the safety of toothpastes, or other oral products, or the quality of the ingredients in these products.
  • The drive to maximize profit margins focuses investment in advertising and packaging, rather than safe and high-quality ingredients.
  • Many ingredients in toothpastes are synthetics derived from petroleum or from heavily processed and synthesized natural ingredients, which, in their final formulation, are not remotely related to the natural parent compound (e.g. coconut oil), and some may become potentially toxic.
  • Toothpaste ingredient labels are often unintelligible, with difficult to pronounce ingredients that only a cosmetics chemist might decipher and understand.
  • Some toothpastes may contain contaminated ingredients. In addition, toxic compounds may be formed by the interaction of ingredients under certain conditions or may be released slowly over time.
  • The average American will use about 20 gallons of toothpaste over his or her lifetime.
  • Children are at greater risk of exposure, because they tend to ingest more toothpaste than adults; in addition, their exposure, will be greater than adults’ in terms of amount of toothpaste used per body weight.
  • Toothpastes specifically targeted to children often contain artificial colors (food dyes), which have been linked to hyperactivity and related behavioral problems in children. Some of which also pose a risk of cancer and allergic reactions.

TYPICAL TOOTHPASTE INGREDIENTS

  • Mild abrasives to remove debris and residual surface stains. Examples include calcium carbonate, dehydrated silica gels, hydrated aluminum oxides, magnesium carbonate, phosphate salts, and silicates.
  • Fluoride to strengthen tooth enamel and remineralize tooth decay. All ADA-accepted toothpastes contain fluoride.
  • Humectants to prevent water loss in the toothpaste. Examples include glycerol, propylene glycol, and sorbitol.
  • Flavoring agents, such as saccharin, sorbitol, and other sweeteners, to provide taste. Flavoring agents do not promote tooth decay. (No ADA-Accepted toothpaste contains sugar or any other ingredient that would promote tooth decay.)
  • Thickening agents or binders to stabilize the toothpaste formula. They include mineral colloids, natural gums, seaweed colloids [e.g. carrageenan], or synthetic cellulose.
  • Detergents to create foaming action, including sodium lauryl sulfate and sodium lauroyl sarcosinate.
  • Some toothpastes contain ingredients such as potassium nitrate or strontium chloride to help reduce tooth sensitivity; stannous fluoride and triclosan to help reduce gingivitis; pyrophosphates, triclosan, and zinc citrate to help reduce a buildup of hardened plaque; modified silica abrasives or enzymes to help whiten teeth by physically removing surface stains; and some additional ingredients, such as triclosan, to help reduce bad breath.

LIST OF COLOR ADDITIVES, PIGMENTS AND COLORANTS CURRENTLY USED IN SOME TOOTHPASTES – These are mainly found in mass-marketed toothpastes, such as Crest, Colgate, Aquafresh, Arm & Hammer, etc.:

  • FD&C Blue 1 (also known as Blue 1)
  • FD&C Blue 1 Aluminum Lake (also known as Blue 1 Aluminum Lake or Blue 1 Lake)
  • FD&C Red 40 (also known as Red 40)
  • FD&C Red 40 Aluminum Lake (also known as Red 40 Aluminum Lake or Red 40 Lake)
  • FD&C Red 33
  • D&C Red 33 (also known as Red 33)
  • D&C Red 30 (also known as Red 30)
  • D&C Red 30 Lake Aluminum (also known as Red 30 Aluminum Lake or Red 30 Lake)
  • FD&C Yellow 5 (also known as D&C Yellow 5 or Yellow 5)
  • FD&C Yellow 5 Aluminum Lake (also known as D&C Yellow 5 Aluminum Lake, Yellow 5 Aluminum Lake or Yellow 5 Lake)
  • FD&C Yellow 6 Aluminum Lake (also known as Yellow 6 Aluminum Lake or yellow 6 Lake)
  • D&C Yellow 10 (also known as Yellow 10)
  • D&C Yellow 10 Aluminum Lake (also known as Yellow 10 Aluminum Lake or Yellow 10 Lake)
  • FD&C Green 3 (also known as Green 3)
  • titanium dioxide
  • zinc oxide
  • iron oxides

So, after reading all of those, do you still want to put toothpaste in your mouth, in your children’s mouths?

I certainly don’t! That’s why I make Mother Jai’s Charcoal Toothpowder. It’s all natural, deeply cleansing, antibacterial, and healing to teeth, gums, cheeks and tongue. And it can be swallowed without calling the poison control center!

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Mother Jai’s Charcoal Toothpowder is Simply made with:

  • activated charcoal (extremely adsorptive [electrical absorption], provides gentle abrasion to tooth surface, and deeply cleansing between teeth)
  • shavegrass or horsetail fern (full of natural, plant based silica to reharden enamel on teeth and strengthen roots and tooth canals)
  • arrowroot powder (antibacterial and healing to tissues, used by natives to kill bacteria in arrow wounds)
  • Baking soda or sodium bicarbonate (acid reducing to help prevent acids from feeding bacteria forming on teeth and causing plaque formation and tooth decay)
  • Sea salt (provides essential minerals like magnesium for optimal mouth health)

Aroma Spray

Mother Jai’s Aroma Spray

Mother Jai creates a professionally blended spray for personal use. It is a water based spray with Everclear and essential oils, blended for every day use. Multiple all natural blends are available for enjoyment, cleaning and health benefit. Get yours here.

Distilled water provides a clean base for aroma sprays. Although distilled water does not emulsify essential oils it provides an odor free and all natural base for sprays. We all know that oil and water don’t mix, so we must emulsify the oils for them to mix with water and be effectively dispersed. That’s where Everclear comes in.

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Everclear is 190 proof Grain Alcohol that effectively emulsifies essential oils for safe dispersion as well as naturally preserves the water and prevents mold growth. No other alcohol emulsifies essential oils as effectively as Everclear.

All essential oils Mother Jai uses come from PlantTherapy.com

Allergy Relief Tea

Mother Jai’s Allergy Relief Tea

With February coming to a close we are all starting to think about Spring. Allergy season is just around the corner and we’re all dreading it. So, what’s your plan this year? Suffer with antihistamine side effects or try something different?

Mother Jai’s has the simple answer with her Organic Allergy Relief Tea!

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This simple combination of Stinging Nettles Leaf and Red Clover Flowers and Herb has strong antihistamine (anti-allergy) and anti-inflammatory properties that reduce sinus pressure and stop histamine reactions. All of this without any side effects! No drowsiness! No foggy brain! No painful over-drying of sinuses!

Why Does It Work?

This proprietary blend of Stinging Nettles, Red Clover Flowers, and Red Clover Leaf provides a wide variety of nutrients essential for health. The specific combination of nutrients found in these herbs are known to reduce allergy symptoms with the first dose and to continue reducing allergic reactions and their symptoms with continued use.

The great thing about these herbs is that they are simply nutrient dense vegetables that you would have extreme difficulty overdosing or getting ill from consuming them in tea multiple times daily. They provide support without side effects for the entire season and on if you also struggle with inside allergens.

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Consuming this tea on a daily basis has been known to reduce or eliminate indoor and pet allergies as well, with continued use and depending on the severity of your allergies. You can get relief without feeling drunk and dumb, that’s how drugs like Sudafed always made me feel anyway.

Either way your eliminating the horrible side effects of antihistamines and reducing the chemicals in your body while also getting more water and nutrients. Four very important, and yet so simple, ways to improve your overall health and wellness.

by Uwe H. Friese, Bremerhaven 2003

Stinging Nettles (Urtica dioica): an herbaceous perennial flowering plant originally from Europe, Africa, and Asia. It is cultivated for food, textiles, medicines, and teas worldwide now.

Cooked Nettles taste similar to spinach and is rich in vitamins A and C, iron, potassium, manganese, and calcium. Fresh leaves contain approximately 82.4% water, 17.6% dry matter, 5.5% protein, 0.7 to 3.3% fat, and 7.1% carbohydrates. They must be cooked or dried to be safely handled or eaten.

  • Nettle has agglutinin, acetophenone, alkaloids, acetylcholine, chlorogenic acid, butyric acid, chlorophyll, caffeic acid, carbonic acid, choline, histamine, coumaric acid, formic acid, pantothenic acid, kaempferol, coproporphyrin, lectin, lecithin, lignan, linoleic and linolenic acids, palmitic acid, xanthophyll, quercetin, quinic acid, serotonin, stigmasterol, terpenes, violaxanthin, and succinic acid in its chemical content.
  • Nettle also contains 2,5% fatty substance, 14–17% albumins, and 18% protein in dry matter. Seeds of nettle contain 8–10% fixed oil. 1 kg fresh plant contains 130 mg vitamin C, 730 mg carotene, and oxalate.
  • Stinging hair of nettle contains formic acid, histamine, and acetylcholine.
  • Leaves of nettle contain provitamin A, vitamin B1, K, xanthophylls, and sistosterin
  • Ashes of nettle contain 6,3% ferric oxide, potassium, calcium, and silicium.

Dried Nettles herb has been used in the traditional Austrian medicine internally (as tea or fresh leaves) to treat disorders of the kidneys and urinary tract, gastrointestinal tract, locomotor system, skin, cardiovascular system, hemorrhage, influenza, rheumatism, and gout.

Nettle stems contain a bast fiber that has been traditionally used for the same purposes as linen and is produced by a similar retting process. Unlike cotton, nettles grow easily without pesticides. The fibers are coarser, however.

Historically, nettles have been used to make clothing for 2,000 years, and German Army uniforms were almost all made from nettle during World War I due to a potential shortage of cotton. More recently, companies in Austria, Germany, and Italy have started to produce commercial nettle textiles.

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Red Clover (Trifolium pretense): a short-lived herbaceous perennial flowering plant in the bean family, native to Europe, Western Asia, and Africa. Is now naturalized in many other regions.

Red clover’s flowers and leaves are edible and can be added as garnishes to any dish. The flowers often are used to make jelly and tisanes and are used in essiac recipes. Their essential oil may be extracted, and its unique scent used in aromatherapy.

Red Clover is used in traditional medicine of India as deobstruent, antispasmodic, expectorant, sedative, anti-inflammatory and antidermatosis agent. In alternative medicine, red clover is promoted as a treatment for a variety of human maladies, including symptoms of menopause, coughs, disorders of the lymphatic system and a variety of cancers.

Dietary amounts of red clover are safe, but dietary supplement extracts may cause rash-like reactions, muscle ache, headache, nausea, vaginal bleeding in women, and slow blood clotting. Due to its coumarin derivatives, T. pratense should be used with caution in individuals with coagulation disorders or currently undergoing anticoagulation therapy.

References:

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  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urtica_dioica
  2. https://i2.wp.com/www.compoundchem.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/The-Chemistry-of-Stinging-Nettles-2016.png
  3. https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-664/stinging-nettle
  4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3349212/
  5. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1756464617300944
  6. https://www.compoundchem.com/2015/06/04/nettles/
  7. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/313846106_Chemical_composition_of_stinging_nettle_leaves_obtained_by_different_analytical_approaches
  8. https://pubag.nal.usda.gov/catalog/5640710
  9. https://www.hindawi.com/journals/tswj/2012/564367/citations/
  10. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/stinging-nettle
  11. https://www.verywellhealth.com/the-benefits-of-nettle-89576
  12. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trifolium_pratense
  13. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16566672
  14. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1780253/
  15. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/7211943_The_Chemical_and_Biologic_Profile_of_a_Red_Clover_Trifolium_pratense_L_Phase_II_Clinical_Extract
  16. https://dl.sciencesocieties.org/publications/aj/abstracts/46/9/AJ0460090397?access=0&view=pdf
  17. https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/agricultural-and-biological-sciences/trifolium-pratense
  18. http://powo.science.kew.org/taxon/urn:lsid:ipni.org:names:523575-1
  19. https://www.mountainroseherbs.com/products/red-clover-herb/profile