Clove Bud

Clove Bud (Syzygium aromaticum)

You will find Clove Bud in Mother Jai’s Pain Relief Oils, Aroma Sprays, and Mouthwash

Other Names: Bourgeon Floral de Clou de Girofle, Bouton Floral de Clou de Girofle, Caryophylli Flos, Caryophyllum, Caryophyllus aromaticus, Clavo de Olor, Clous de Girolfe, Clove Flower, Clove Flowerbud, Clove Leaf, Clove Oil, Clove Stem, Cloves

Botany: The clove plant grows in warm climates and is cultivated commercially in Tanzania, Sumatra, the Maluku (Molucca) Islands, and South America. The tall evergreen plant grows up to 20 m and has leathery leaves. The strongly aromatic clove spice is the dried flower bud; essential oils are obtained from the buds, stems, and leaves. The dark brown buds are 12 to 22 mm in length and have 4 projecting calyx lobes. The 4 petals above the lobes fold over to form a hood, which hides numerous stamens. Synonyms are Eugenia caryophyllata , Eugenia caryophyllus , and Caryophyllus aromaticus .

Oil properties: Clove oil has a warm, strong, spicy smell and the oil is colorless to pale yellow with a medium to watery viscosity. It blends well with Allspice, basil, bay, bergamot, chamomile, clary sage, geranium, ginger, grapefruit, jasmine, lavender, lemon, mandarin, palmarosa, rose, sandalwood, vanilla, ylang ylang

Origin of clove oil: A native of Indonesia and the Malacca Islands, it is an evergreen tree that grows to about 10 meters (30 feet) tall and has bright green leaves and nail-shaped rose-peach flower buds which turn, upon drying, a deep red brown. These are beaten from the tree and dried. The Latin word ‘Clavus’ means nail shaped, referring to the bud. It was often used by the Greeks, Roman and the Chinese, to ease toothache and as a breath sweetener, especially when talking to the Emperor. It has antiseptic properties and was used in the prevention of contagious diseases, such as the Plaque. It was an important commodity in the spice trade and is still used in perfumes, mulled wines and liqueurs, love potions, dental products and, stuck in an orange as pomade, an insect repellant.

Extraction clove oil: Clove oil can be extracted from the leaves, stem and buds. We sell clove leaf oil, which is extracted by water distillation, containing the desired lower percentage of eugenol.

Chemical composition: The main chemical components of clove oil are eugenol, eugenol acetate, iso-eugenol and caryophyllene.

Scientific Facts About Clove: Clove is the dried bud of the flower from the tree Syzygium aromaticum. It belongs to the plant family named Myrtaceae. The plant is an evergreen plant growing in tropical and subtropical conditions. Clove is an herb and people use various parts of the plant, including the dried bud, stems, and leaves to make medicine. Clove oil is also famous for its medicinal properties. Clove has been used for thousands of years in India and China not only as a spice and condiment but also as a medicine for many ailments. Ayurvedic medicating used cloves for tooth decay, halitosis, and bad breath. In Chinese medicine, clove was considered to possess aphrodisiac properties.

Cloves Nutrition Facts: According to the National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, the nutrients found in 100 grams of cloves include 65 grams of carbohydrate, 6 grams of protein, 13 grams of total lipids, 2 grams of sugars, 274 kcal of energy and 33 grams of dietary fibers. Minerals in cloves include calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorous, potassium, sodium, and zinc. The vitamins found in them include vitamin C, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, folate, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, vitamin A, vitamin E, vitamin D, and vitamin K.

Precautions: Clove oil is a very potent oil and should be used with care. If it is used in a oil, lotion or cream applied to the skin, the concentration should be well below 1%. It may cause irritation to the skin of some individuals and can easily irritate the mucus membranes. It should be avoided during pregnancy.

Therapeutic properties: analgesic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, anti-neuralgic, carminative, anti-infectious, disinfectant, insecticide, stimulant, stomachic, uterine and tonic.

Clove oil can be used for acne, bruises, burns and cuts, keeping infection at bay and as a pain reliever. It helps with toothache, mouth sores, rheumatism and arthritis. It is beneficial to the digestive system, effective against vomiting, diarrhea, flatulence, spasms and parasites, as well as bad breath. Clove oil is valuable for relieving respiratory problems, like bronchitis, asthma and tuberculosis. The disinfecting property is useful in cases of infectious diseases. Placing a few drops of clove oil on a cotton ball and then placing the cotton ball in a linen cupboard will not only fragrance the cupboard, but will help to keep fish moths at bay.

Burners and vaporizers: In vapor therapy, clove oil can be useful for bronchitis and dizziness and to help lift depression, while strengthening memory and fighting weakness and lethargy.

Massage oil: Clove oil can be used in a blended massage oil to assist with diarrhea, bronchitis, chills, colds, muscular numbness, spasms, rheumatism and arthritis. For toothache the outer jaw can be massaged with this oil. Use a low dilution of less than 1%.

In cream or lotion: When used in a cream or lotion, the positive effects of clove oil are the same as those of a massage oil and can furthermore help to sort out leg ulcers and skin sores. Use in low dilution of less than 1%.

Mouthwash: Clove oil can be included at a low rate as part of a mouthwash for toothache.

Health benefits of clove bud

Better Digestion: Cloves improve digestion by stimulating the secretion of digestive enzymes. Cloves are also good for reducing flatulence, gastric irritability, dyspepsia, and nausea. They can be roasted, powdered, and taken with honey for relief in digestive disorders.

Antibacterial Properties: Cloves have been tested for their antibacterial properties against a number of human pathogens. The extracts of cloves were potent enough to kill those pathogens. Clove extracts are also effective against the specific bacteria that spread cholera.

Chemo-preventive Properties: Cloves are of interest to the medical community due to their chemo-preventive or anti-carcinogenic properties. Tests have shown that they are helpful in controlling lung cancer at its early stages.

Liver Protection: Cloves contain high amounts of antioxidants, which are ideal for protecting the organs from the effects of free radicals, especially the liver. Metabolism, in the long run, increases free radical production and lipid profile, while decreasing the antioxidants in the liver. Clove extracts are helpful in counteracting those effects with its hepatoprotective properties.

Diabetes Control: Cloves have been used in many traditional remedies for a number of diseases. One such disease is diabetes. In patients suffering from diabetes, the amount of insulin produced by the body is not sufficient or insulin is not produced at all. Studies have revealed that extracts from cloves imitate insulin in certain ways and help in controlling blood sugar levels.

Bone Preservation: The hydro-alcoholic extracts of cloves include phenolic compounds such as eugenol and its derivatives, such as flavones, isoflavones and flavonoids. These extracts have been particularly helpful in preserving bone density and the mineral content of bone, as well as increasing tensile strength of bones in case of osteoporosis.

Anti-mutagenic Properties: Mutagens are those chemicals that change the genetic makeup of the DNA by causing mutations. Biochemical compounds found in cloves, like phenylpropanoids, possess anti-mutagenic properties. These were administered on cells treated with mutagens and they were able to control the mutagenic effects to a significant rate.

Boosts the Immune System: Ayurveda describes certain plants to be effective in developing and protecting the immune system. One such plant is clove. The dried flower bud of clove contains compounds that help in improving the immune system by increasing the white blood cell count, thereby, improving delayed-type hypersensitivity.

Anti-inflammatory Properties: Cloves possess anti-inflammatory and pain-killing properties. Studies on clove extracts being administered in lab rats, suggest that the presence of eugenol reduced the inflammation caused by edema. It was also confirmed that eugenol has the ability to reduce pain by stimulating pain receptors.

Cure for Oral Diseases: Cloves can be taken for gum diseases like gingivitis and periodontitis. Clove bud extracts significantly control the growth of oral pathogens, which are responsible for various oral diseases. Cloves can also be used for toothaches due to their pain-killing properties.

Aphrodisiac Properties: Spices such as clove and nutmeg have been said to possess aphrodisiac properties, according to Unani medicine. Experiments on clove and nutmeg extracts were tested against standard drugs administered for that reason, and both clove and nutmeg showed positive results.

Cure for Headaches: Headaches can be reduced by using cloves. Make a paste of a few cloves and mix it with a dash of rock salt. Add this to a glass of milk. This mixture reduces headaches quickly and effectively.

Anal fissures. Early research suggests that applying a clove oil cream to anal fissures for 6 weeks improves healing compared to using stool softeners and applying lignocaine cream.

Dental plaque. Early research suggests that using a specific toothpaste (Sudantha, Link Natural Products Ltd.) containing a combination of clove, Acacia chundra Willd., malabar nut, bullet wood tree, black pepper, Indian beech, gall oak, Terminalia, and ginger twice daily for 12 weeks can reduce dental plaque, bleeding, and amount of bacteria in the mouth.

Mosquito repellent. Early research suggests that applying clove oil or clove oil gel to the skin can repel mosquitos for up to 5 hours.

Pain. Early research suggests that applying a gel containing ground cloves for 5 minutes before being stuck with a needle can reduce needle stick pain similarly to benzocaine.

Premature ejaculation. Research shows that applying a cream containing clove flower plus Panax ginseng root, Angelica root, Cistanches deserticola, Zanthoxyl species, Torlidis seed, Asiasari root, cinnamon bark, and toad venom (SS Cream) to the skin of the penis improves premature ejaculation.

Toothache. Clove oil and eugenol, one of the chemicals it contains, have long been used topically for toothache, but the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has reclassified eugenol, downgrading its effectiveness rating. The FDA now believes there is not enough evidence to rate eugenol as effective for toothache pain. “Dry socket” following tooth extraction.

Side Effects Of Using Clove

Clove Oil: Clove oils must not be used directly; instead they must be diluted either in olive oil or in distilled water. Clove extract oil is generally considered to be safe, but certain studies have revealed that they possess cytotoxic properties. There are two major components present in clove extract oil, eugenol, and B-caryophyllene. These compounds were particularly effective against fibroblasts and endothelial cells.

Clove Cigarettes: In Indonesia, cloves are consumed on a large scale in the form of cigarettes, popularly known as kreteks. These clove cigarettes have emerged as an alternative to tobacco cigarettes, but research shows that clove cigarettes are actually worse than conventional cigarettes. In the case of clove cigarettes, the amount of nicotine, carbon monoxide, and tar entering into the lungs was higher than that from normal tobacco cigarettes.

Note These Contraindications for the Use of Clove Oil

Keep in mind that the oil of cloves should be used moderately. Because of the high content of eugenol, excessive use may cause nausea, vomiting and blood problems. Other contraindications for this essential oil include the following:

• Phototoxicity. Do not use this oil before going out into direct sunlight, as it can lead to severe burns and other skin problems.

• Aspirin or anticoagulant medications. Clove bud oil can slow down platelet activity, which can interfere with these medications and cause adverse effects.

• Allergic reactions. Topically applying clove bud oil on damaged skin may cause severe allergic reactions and can further damage the skin.

Recipes

Clove and Cinnamon Tea

  • 1 1/2 cup water
  • 1 clove, crushed
  • 1 pinch cinnamon
  • 3/4 teaspoon tea leaves
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • 1 teaspoon raw milk, optional

Cooking Directions:

  • Boil water, cloves and cinnamon powder.
  • Cover the pot with a tight lid to retain flavors.
  • Boil for about two minutes.
  • Lower the heat and add the tea leaves.
  • Remove from heat and let stand for a few minutes or until it is drinkable.
  • Add the honey and milk. Serve.

World’s Greatest Vegetable Broth

  • 1 pound celery
  • 1 1/2 pound sweet onions
  • 1 pound carrots, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 pound tomatoes, cored
  • 1 pound green bell pepper, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1/2 pound turnips, cubed
  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 3 whole cloves
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 6 whole black peppercorns
  • 1 bunch fresh parsley, chopped
  • 1 gallon water

Cooking Directions:

  • Preheat oven to 450 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Remove leaves and tender inner parts of celery. Set aside.
  • Toss onions, carrots, tomatoes, bell peppers and turnips with coconut oil. Place vegetables in a roasting pan and place them in the oven. Stir the vegetable every 15 minutes. Cook until all of the vegetables have browned and the onions start to caramelize. This takes about an hour.
  • Put the browned vegetables, celery, garlic, cloves, bay leaf, peppercorns, parsley and water into a stock pot. Bring to a full boil. Reduce the heat to simmer. Cook uncovered until liquid is reduced in half.
  • Pour the broth through a colander, catching the broth in a large bowl or pot. The broth can be use immediately in other dishes or frozen for future use.

How to Make Infused Clove Oil

  • 4 fresh clove buds, crushed
  • Carrier oil, such as coconut oil
  • Strainer
  • Glass container with spout
  • Airtight bottleneck jar

Procedure:

  • Take the airtight jar and place the four crushed cloves at the bottom. Crush them thoroughly so that they can fit into the container.
  • Fill the jar with the carrier oil until the cloves are submerged, but not too much to overfill the container.
  • Seal the container tightly. Exposure to air can affect the oil’s potency.
  • Set aside the mixture for a week in an area where it can be exposed to sunlight.
  • Transfer the mixture into the glass container with a spout. Use the strainer to remove any sediment. Do not hesitate to strain the oil a couple of times to make sure particles are completely removed.
  • Dispose of the cloves from the strainer and do not reuse these cloves, as doing so can impact the effectiveness of the oil.
  • The strained mixture should be poured back into the airtight bottleneck container.
  • When storing, make sure the oil of is sealed tight. Shelf life can last from four to five years. Color may darken as time progresses.

Cleansing the body from parasites

– a mixture of linseed and cloves

Ingredients:

  • The linseed and the clove are effective with almost all types of parasites.
  • In order to prepare the mixture for cleansing, you need to take 10 parts of linseed and 1 part of dried cloves (100 grams of linseed and 10 grams of cloves).
  • The cloves are actually immature, unopened flower buds of the tropical tree in the myrtle family. While they are fresh, they are pink, and when they are dried they change their color in brown.

Preparation:

  • Chop everything together into dust in a coffee mill.
  • This is your healing powder for cleansing!

Consumption:

  • Take 2 tablespoons of it every day, for three days.
  • You can add the powder to cooked food in one meal, or eat it and then drink a glass of warm water (preferably in the morning).
  • After three days of taking this mixture, you should take a break for 3 days.
  • Then repeat everything again.
  • You should take this mixture for about one month.

References:

  1. http://essentialoils.co.za/essential-oils/clove.htm
  2. https://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-251-clove.aspx?activeingredientid=251&activeingredientname=clove
  3. https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/858d/c0cdbe19ca12d9b0f74ed503cf909791ecc1.pdf
  4. https://www.drugs.com/npp/clove.html
  5. http://naturalsociety.com/health-benefits-of-cloves-super-spice-healing/
  6. http://www.healthyfoodplace.com/cleanse-body-parasites-normalize-weight-two-ingredients/
  7. https://articles.mercola.com/herbs-spices/cloves.aspx
  8. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3819475/
  9. http://aip.scitation.org/doi/pdf/10.1063/1.4991186
  10. https://www.mountainroseherbs.com/products/clove-bud-essential-oil/profile
  11. http://ojs.cnr.ncsu.edu/index.php/BioRes/article/view/BioRes_02_2_265_269_Alma_ENK_Turkish_Clove_Essential_Oils
  12. https://www.probotanic.com/pdf_istrazivanja/ulje_karanfilica/Ulje%20karanfilica%20dokazano%20deluje%20protiv%20mikroorganizama%20koji%20uzrokuju%20karijes.pdf
  13. http://www.essencejournal.com/pdf/2015/vol2issue3/PartA/2-3-2-972.pdf
  14. http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AIPC.1862c0089S
  15. http://www.microbiologyresearch.org/docserver/fulltext/jmm/58/11/1454.pdf?expires=1512247442&id=id&accname=guest&checksum=F00E07D0D85DF5B8B36D04401FFC2C62
  16. http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162015000300010
  17. http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jf060608c
  18. http://www.sciencedomain.org/abstract/3955
  19. https://www.planttherapy.com/clove-bud-organic-essential-oil
  20. http://www.essentialingredients.com/msds/Clove%20Bud%20Oil%20Natural.pdf
  21. http://uses.plantnet-project.org/en/Syzygium_aromaticum_(PROSEA)
  22. https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/herbs-and-spices/health-benefits-of-cloves.html
  23. http://books.google.co.in/books?id=0q_r9aYSF_MC
  24. https://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/natural/251.html
  25. http://books.google.co.in/books?id=C0D3z66O8Q8C
  26. https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/261
  27. http://www.relaquim.com/archive/2007/p2007353-47.pdf
  28. http://carcin.oxfordjournals.org/content/27/8/1645
  29. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2004.09.024
  30. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14786419.2010.511216
  31. http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jf030247q
  32. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1211/jpp.61.07.0017/abstract
  33. http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0102-695X2009000200006&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en
  34. http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/np960451q
  35. http://bmccomplementalternmed.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1472-6882-3-6
  36. http://books.google.co.in/books?id=C0D3z66O8Q8C
  37. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2184.2006.00384.x/abstract
  38. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0091-3057(02)01076-6

Cinnamon Leaf

Cinnamon leaf oil (Cinnamomum verum)

Find Cinnamon leaf oil in Mother Jai’s Aroma Sprays and many other truly natural products. Petroleum and artificial preservative free! We ONLY use all natural and American made Everclear as an emulsifier and preservative!

Learn more about Cinnamon Leaf essential oil below.

Cinnamon leaf oil comes from Cinnamonum verum (also called Laurus cinnamomum) from the Laurel (Lauraceae) plant family. This small and bushy evergreen tree is native to Sri Lanka, but now grows in many countries such as India, China, Bangladesh, Myanmar, and Indonesia. There are actually over 100 varieties of C. verum, with Cinnamonum zeylanicum (Ceylon cinnamon) and Cinnamomun aromaticum (Chinese cinnamon) as the most consumed.

Cinnamon bark oil is extracted from the outer bark of the tree, resulting in a potent, perfume-quality essential oil. Cinnamon bark oil is extremely refined and therefore very expensive for everyday use, which is why many people settle for cinnamon leaf oil, as it’s lighter, cheaper, and ideal for regular use. Cinnamon leaf oil has a musky and spicy scent, and a light yellow tinge that distinguishes it from the red-brown color of cinnamon bark oil.

Composition of Cinnamon Leaf Oil

The oil extracted from cinnamon leaves contain phenols and beneficial components like eugenol, eugenol acetate, cinnamic aldehyde, linalool, and benzyl benzoate. It also has low levels of cinnamaldehyde, an excellent flavoring agent and the active component that helps repel mosquitoes and other insects. The leaf oil has a higher eugenol content then the bark oil, which increases its analgesic properties.

Blends Well With

Benzoin, bergamot, cardamom, clove, frankincense, ginger, grapefruit, lemon, mandarin, marjoram, nutmeg, orange, peppermint, peru balsam, petitgrain, rose, vanilla, ylang ylang

Blending: This oil blends well with various essential oils, so it is added to many aromatherapy preparations. It enhances the effectiveness of other herbs and essential oils, thus speeding up the treatment of various herbal remedies. Furthermore, many herbs can have an unpleasant taste. Cinnamon or cinnamon oil is often added to herbal preparations to make them taste better.

https://www.planttherapy.com

Uses of Cinnamon Leaf Oil

Cinnamon leaf oil can be used as an additive in soaps and a flavoring to seasonings. When used in aromatherapy – diffused, applied topically (I recommend diluting with a mild essential oil or mixing in your favorite cream, lotion, or shampoo), or added to your bath water – it can have health-promoting effects. Here are some ways to use cinnamon leaf oil for your health and around your home:

Use it as a disinfectant. With its strong germicidal properties, cinnamon leaf oil works as a non-toxic natural disinfectant. Use it to clean your toilets, refrigerator, kitchen counters and other surfaces, door knobs, microwave, and sneakers. You can even use it to clean and disinfect your chopping boards.

Make a facial scrub. Mix it with cinnamon sugar, orange juice, and olive oil to create a rejuvenating scrub that has antiseptic properties to help kill facial bacteria effectively.

Gargle as a mouthwash. Add a drop or two to a glass of purified water, and gargle with it. For people with dentures, simply make a solution of water, hydrogen peroxide, and cinnamon leaf oil, and soak your dentures in it.

Add it to your foot soak. Mix a drop of cinnamon leaf oil in a bucket of warm water, and then soak your feet in it. This works great for athletes and people who wear closed shoes for most of the day.

Use cinnamon leaf oil as an insect repellent. Did you know that the scent of cinnamon leaf oil can deter pesky household insects, such as black ants, mosquitoes, roaches, and flies? Studies found that it may even be more effective at repelling mosquitoes than the toxic chemical DEET. Simply spray or diffuse the oil around your home. You can also spray it over your mattresses and sheets to get rid of bed bugs.

Add it to your shampoo. Add a drop of cinnamon leaf oil to your regular non-chemical shampoo. This will help keep your hair healthy and, in children, help kill stubborn head lice.

Instead of fabric softener. Add a few drops of the oil to wool laundry drying balls. As the balls mingle and fluff damp fabric in the dryer, the scent is transferred. I love adding essential oils when laundering bedding or towels.

Warmer diffusion. Mix a tablespoon of pure coconut oil with two to three drops of cinnamon essential oil, and place it in a wax warmer. As the coconut oil melts, the essential oil scent is released into the air.

Clean better. Place a few drops of cinnamon oil in a homemade cleanser. As you wipe down surfaces, the oil leaves behind a nontoxic scent that some studies claim may help reduce bacteria growth. You can read these and decide for yourself in Public Library of Science (PLoS) ONE and Food Control.

Relax in the bath. Place a few drops of oil in your bath water. As you soak, the aroma fills your bathroom and creates a calm feeling.

Sleep Better. Put one drop of cinnamon essential oil on the back of your pillowcase to promote restful sleep.

Mix a drop or two of cinnamon oil into massage oil before indulging.

Side Effects of Cinnamon Leaf Oil

Use cinnamon oil in moderation and properly diluted, as high dosages may lead to convulsions in some individuals. This oil may also lead to side effects such as skin irritation, mouth sores, dizziness, vomiting, and diarrhea. It may irritate your urinary tract, intestines, and stomach lining, if taken internally. If these symptoms occur, consult a healthcare practitioner immediately.

Very high quantities of cassia cinnamon may be toxic, particularly in people with liver problems. Because cinnamon may lower blood sugar, people with diabetes may need to adjust their treatment if they use cinnamon supplements. An ingredient in some cinnamon products, coumarin, may cause liver problems; but the amount of this compound ingested is usually so small that this wouldn’t happen for most people.

If you take any medication regularly, talk to your doctor before you start using cinnamon supplements. They could interact with antibiotics, diabetes drugs, blood thinners, heart medicines, and others.

Word of Caution: Being strong in nature, cinnamon oil should be avoided for internal consumption. Furthermore, it can have adverse effects on the skin if used topically in concentrated form. Therefore, it should be used in diluted form. Before using the oil, it should be tested to make sure it suits your skin. You should apply only a small quantity of the oil initially and check if you develop an allergic reaction. Do not apply the oil to the face and other sensitive areas.

References:

  1. https://articles.mercola.com/herbal-oils/cinnamon-leaf-oil.aspx
  2. http://www.nutrition-and-you.com/cinnamon-spice.html
  3. http://cinnamonvogue.blogspot.com/2012/09/how-to-use-cinnamon-leaf-oil.html
  4. http://www.essentialoils.co.za/essential-oils/cinnamon-leaf.htm
  5. http://www.quinessence.com/blog/cinnamon-leaf-essential-oil
  6. http://www.organicfacts.net/organic-oils/natural-essential-oils/health-benefits-of-cinnamon-oil.html
  7. http://www.benefitsfromcinnamon.com/benefits/benefits-of-cinnamon-leaves
  8. http://www.nutraingredients-usa.com/news/ng.asp?n=51170-cinnamon-boosts-brain
  9. http://newsroom.heart.org/news/cinnamon-may-lessen-damage-of-high-fat-diet-in-rats?preview=b021
  10. http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn4413#.UmA18_kmvwU
  11. http://pubs.acs.org/journal/jafcau
  12. http://www.ntu.edu.tw/
  13. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0956713514003235

German Chamomile

German ‘Blue’ Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla)

What Is German Chamomile Oil?

German chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla), which is often referred to as blue chamomile or true chamomile, comes from the Compositae sunflower family. It is one of the two chamomile species that can be used medicinally. The other one is the Roman or English chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile).

This plant, which hails from Southern and Eastern parts of Europe, grows from 6 centimeters up to 60 centimeters (2.3 to 23.5 inches) tall with heavily branched and furrowed stems. Like Roman chamomile oil, German chamomile essential oil is extracted either through solvent extraction or steam distillation of its golden yellow flowers that have ray-like blossoms.

You can find German Chamomile in Mother Jai’s Deep Sleep Oil.

Major Constituents

  • Bisabolol
  • Farnesol
  • Azulene
  • Farnasene
  • Thujanol

Composition of German Chamomile Oil

Some of the most important chemical components of German chamomile oil are sesquiterpenes, 36 flavonoids, coumarins and polyacetylenes. Other constituents include chamazulene (which has antiseptic capabilities), as well as 28 terpenoids and 52 additional compounds with potential pharmacological activity that gives it antimicrobial and fungistatic capabilitiesfarnesene, sesquiterpenes, cadinene, furfural, spanthulenol, and proazulenes (matricarin and matricin).

Chamazulene (or azulen when isolated), which provides German chamomile oil its deep bluish color, is formed from matricin during steam distillation. Prolonged storage and light exposure destroys this effect. This often results in a lighter blue color, which can turn into a pale green, yellow or even brown shade.

When it’s still fresh, German chamomile oil has a viscous quality and has a sweet, herbaceous scent with fruity undertones. However, in its concentrated and dried-out form, German chamomile oil can sometimes be nauseating and unpleasant for some individuals. German chamomile oil blends well with rose oil, lavender oil, cedar oil, neroli oil and geranium oil.

Blending: Chamomile Oil forms very pleasant blends with Bergamot, Clary Sage, Lavender, Jasmine, Geranium, Grapefruit, Tea Tree, Rose, Lemon, Lime and Ylang-Ylang Oil.

Benefits of German Chamomile Oil

German chamomile oil provides antispasmodic, antiseptic, antibiotic, antidepressant, antineuralgic, antiphlogistic, carminative, cholagogue, cicatrisant, emmenagogue, analgesic, febrifuge, hepatic, sedative, nervine, digestive, tonic, antispasmodic, bactericidal, sudorific, stomachic, anti-inflammatory, anti-infectious, vermifuge, and vulnerary properties. This beneficial essential oil penetrates deep into the layers of your skin where its potent anti-inflammatory action can restore and soothe irritated skin, mouth ulcers, burns, bruises and other skin conditions. Aside from possibly helping lift up your mood and letting go of your anxieties, German chamomile oil has other reported benefits when used in tandem with other essential oils in aromatherapy.

Uses of German Chamomile Oil

German chamomile oil is broadly used in the cosmetic industry, especially in formulations designed to improve dry, inflamed or irritated skin. It is also added in shampoos and conditioners. Other practical uses of German chamomile oil include:

Allergic reactions — Apply topically on the affected area in a balm or coconut oil for instant relief.

Anogenital disorders — Add in baths and irrigation.

Candida infection — Can help alleviate itching caused by yeast fungus in the vaginal area by having a warm sitz bath regularly until your condition improves. Add one drop of German chamomile oil and two drops of tea tree oil in a gallon of warm water.

Hair moisturizer — Blend two drops of German chamomile oil, rosemary oil, and lavender oil with 4 tablespoons of sweet almond oil. Massage it onto your hair and scalp once a week. For best results, leave it on overnight.

Inflammation and irritation of the respiratory tract — By inhalation either through diffusion or spraying.

Improves Digestion – Being a stomachic, they tone up the stomach and ensure its proper function. They also promote the secretion of digestive juices into the stomach and facilitate digestion. Being Hepatic, which means being good for the liver, they ensure good health of the liver and the proper flow of bile from it. They are also considered Cholagogues, meaning that they increase the secretion of Hydrochloric Acid, bile, and enzymes in the stomach, thereby promoting digestion.

Open leg sores, wounds, hemorrhoids, mastitis, eczemas, gingivitis and ingrown nails — Use topically as a poultice, salve or compress. To make a compress, take a damp cloth, add a few drops of German chamomile oil, and place it on top of the affected area with the essential oil facing away from the skin. This way, the oil’s healing properties will seep into the cloth without putting the skin at risk of any potential hypersensitivity.

Menstrual cramps — Take a five-minute sitz bath (a warm, shallow bath that cleanses your perineum, the space between your rectum and the vulva or scrotum) in a gallon of warm water with two drops of German chamomile and lavender oil.

May help relieve migraine — Moisten a towel with cool water and add a few drops of German chamomile oil. Place the damp cloth on your forehead, close your eyes and relax.

May provide relief from joint pain or tense, stiff and cramping muscles —Blend 2 tablespoons of sweet almond oil and two drops of German chamomile oil and rosemary oil. Massage this blend onto the affected areas to ease up the tensed muscles and increase circulation.

Moisturizing skin mist — To make your own natural skin mist, blend two drops of German chamomile oil, two drops of lavender oil, one drop of rose otto oil and 4 ounces of purified water in a ready-to-spray bottle. This natural moisturizing mist will surely be handy for your sunbathing sessions.

PMS Aide – The symptoms of PMS can be very debilitating for many women. German chamomile’s anti-inflammatory and antispasmodic properties help in relieving many of the symptoms commonly associated with PMS as well as with menopause. It can help to reduce cramping, pain and nausea commonly associated with PMS as well as menopause. It also helps to balance the hormones which can be very unbalanced during PMS and menopause; this helps a woman to be more calm and relaxed or less irritable and emotional during this time.

Prevents Infections – Both varieties have very good antiseptic and antibiotic properties which do not let biotic infections develop, which arise due to biotic factors such as bacteria and fungi. They also eliminate infections that are already present. These are good vermifuge agents as well, which kill all sorts of intestinal worms. If applied to the hair, it kills lice and mites, keeping the hair and scalp free from infections and damage.

Reduces Anger – While Roman Chamomile is found to be effective in calming down annoyance, anger, and irritation, particularly in small children. The German variety, on the other hand, is found to be more effective on adults for curing inflammation, particularly when it is located in the digestive or urinary system. They also reduce blood pressure and curb the swelling of blood vessels.

Relieves Depression – Both varieties have been seen to be very effective in fighting depression and for raising spirits. They eliminate feelings of sadness, depression, disappointment, and sluggishness while inducing a sort of happy or charged feeling. Even smelling these oils can help a lot in overcoming depression and bringing about a good mood.

Removes Toxic Agents – As a sudorific, both varieties of chamomile oil induce profuse perspiration, which helps to remove toxins and agents that cause infections while simultaneously cooling down the body and effectively providing relief from fever, thus serving as a Febrifuge.

Sedative – German chamomile is well known for is sedative properties. It allows the body and the mind to relax and calm prior to bedtime allowing for a more restful and deeper sleep. This property is also important when it comes to relieving stress, depression and anxiety because it allows the body and the mind to calm and stop racing allowing a person to relax enough to fall asleep faster and stay asleep longer. Getting a proper night’s sleep is also very important when having a cold or flu as sleep helps to heal the body from said infection.

Shingles — Use topically as a poultice. Combine 10 drops of German chamomile oil, two drops of geranium oil, four drops of bergamot oil, six drops of balm, and five drops of lavender. Mix it in water to use as a compress or in 1 3/4 fluid ounces of almond oil.

Skin toner — German chamomile oil has astringent properties, which makes it ideal for pore-cleansing treatment. Simply add the essential oil to your own homemade facial cleanser and apply using cotton balls.

Treats Rheumatism – They cure dysfunctions of the circulatory system, stimulate circulation and detoxify the blood from toxins like uric acid, thereby helping to cure ailments like rheumatism and arthritis, which are caused due to improper circulation and accumulation of uric acid. These abilities classify them as good antiphlogistics, any agents which reduce swelling and edema.

Side Effects of German Chamomile Oil

Never use German chamomile oil during pregnancy as it may induce menstruation and/or premature labor due to its emmenagogue and uterotonic side effects. It also contains coumarin, so care should be taken to avoid potential drug interactions, e.g. with blood thinners. Although there are no existing cases of allergic reactions or hypersensitivity linked to the proper use of German chamomile oil. It is suggested to avoid this essential oil if you have a known allergy to any plant from the Asteraceae or Compositae family (daisy, rag weed, chrysanthemum) to prevent any untoward reactions. If you are not sure whether you’re allergic to it or not, a skin patch test is advised. Apply German chamomile oil on a small portion of your skin and wait for a few hours. If irritation occurs, discontinue use immediately.

Possible Interactions

If you take any of the following drugs, you should not use German chamomile without first talking to your health care provider:

  • Blood-thinning medications (anticoagulants and antiplatelets): Chamomile may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with blood-thinners such as warfarin (Coumadin), clopidogrel (Plavix), and aspirin.
  • Sedatives: Use caution with sedatives since chamomile can make these drugs stronger.
  • Anti-seizure medications, such as phenytoin (Dilantin) and valproic acid (Depakote)
  • Barbiturates
  • Benzodiazepines, such as alprazolam (Xanax) and diazepam (Valium)
  • Drugs to treat insomnia, such as zolpidem (Ambien), zaleplon (Sonata), eszopiclone (Lunesta), and ramelteon (Rozerem)
  • Tricyclic antidepressants, such as amitriptyline (Elavil)
  • Alcohol
  • The same is true of sedative herbs, such as valerian, kava, and catnip.
  • Blood pressure medications: Chamomile may lower blood pressure slightly. Taking it with drugs for high blood pressure could cause blood pressure to drop too low.
  • Diabetes medications: Chamomile may lower blood sugar. Taking it with diabetes drugs could raise the risk of hypoglycemia or low blood sugar.
  • Hormonal therapies: Due to its similarity to estrogen, chamomile may potentially interfere with drugs such as nolvadex (Tamoxifen) among others.
  • Other drugs: Because chamomile is broken down by the liver, it may interact with other drugs that are broken down the same way. Those drugs may include:
  • Fexofenadine (Seldane)
  • Statins (drugs that can lower cholesterol)
  • Birth control pills
  • Some antifungal drugs

Available Forms

German chamomile is available as dried flower heads, tea, essential oil, liquid extract, capsules, and topical ointment.

How to Take It

Pediatric – Ask your doctor before giving chamomile tea to a child. Children under 5 should not take more than half a cup of tea per day.

  • To relieve colic: Some doctors suggest 1 to 2 oz. of tea per day. Your doctor may recommend other doses.

Adult

  • Tea: Pour 1 cup of boiling water over 2 to 3 heaping tsp. (2 to 4 g) of dried herb, steep 10 to 15 minutes. Drink 3 to 4 times per day between meals.
  • Tincture (1:5, 45% alcohol): 30 to 60 drops of tincture, 3 times per day in hot water.
  • Capsules: 300 to 400 mg taken 3 times per day.
  • Gargle or mouthwash: Make a tea as above, then let it cool. Gargle as often as desired. You may also make an oral rinse with 10 to 15 drops of German chamomile liquid extract in 100 ml warm water, and use 3 times per day.
  • Inhalation: Add a few drops of essential oil of chamomile to hot water (or use tea) and breathe in the steam to calm a cough.
  • Bath: Use 1/4 lb. of dried flowers per bath, or add 5 to 10 drops of essential oil to a full tub of water to soothe hemorrhoids, cuts, eczema, or insect bites.
  • Poultice: Make a paste by mixing powdered herb with water and apply to inflamed skin.
  • Cream: Use a cream with a 3 to 10% chamomile content for psoriasis, eczema, or dry and flaky skin.

History of German Chamomile

The word chamomile comes from the Greek word chamomaela with means ground apple because of its pleasant scent like that of apples and because it grows along the ground. German chamomile also goes by the names Matricaria, Hungarian chamomile, Blue chamomile and True chamomile.

The medicinal uses of German chamomile have been documented throughout the ages. German chamomile has been used for over 2000 years in many cosmetics and perfumes as well as being commonly used medicinally for its many health benefits. Asclepius, Galen, Hippocrates and Culpepper have all written about the amazing soothing and calming properties that it possesses. Back in 78 AD German chamomile was listed in the European standard reference book Dioscorides De Materia Medica because of its many health benefits and uses.

The Egyptian god Ra was said to have used it at a symbol of his almighty power. While the Egyptian people used to use it as offerings to the gods ask for help with healing the body. The Egyptian people also worshipped the plant and had many festivals in honor of the plants many healing properties. They would often crush the flower and apply it to their skin to bring out the youthful glow in hopes to reduce the signs of aging.

The Anglo-Saxons considered German chamomile to be one of the nine scared herbs and not only wrote a poem about these herbs but gave instructions and recipes on how to use these herbs along or together to heal disease and poison.

During the Middle Ages, 476-1500 AD, German chamomile was used as a strewing herb. This means that the herb was scattered or strewn around on the floor and when walked on would release the fragrance within. This strewing was important during gatherings and festivals to help make the event not only smell nice but to give a sense of calm to those attending.

Today German chamomile is used not only as an essential oil because of its many health benefits, but it is also used in many perfumes, cosmetics, food and drinks because of its calming effect, taste, scent and of course it’s many health benefits.

Recipes

Bathtub Scrub-a-Dub-Dub

½ cup baking soda

½ cup vinegar

5 drop German chamomile EO

5 drops bergamot EO

Directions: Mix all of the above ingredients together in a glass jar. Massage the mixture into the skin focusing on sore muscles. Soak in a warm bath for at least 15 minutes to calm and relax the body and the mind. Use as needed, daily if desired.

Bedtime Face Lotion

15 drops German chamomile EO

15 drops lavender EO

15 drops peppermint EO

¼ cup olive oil

¼ cup coconut oil

¼ cup beeswax

¼ cup shea butter

2 Tbsp. vitamin E

Directions: In a glass bowl added olive oil, beeswax, coconut oil and shea butter. Place the glass bowl over a pot of simmering water on the stove and melt together. Mix well. Once the four ingredients are melted and mixed well together remove from heat and place in the refrigerator for at last an hour or until solid. Once the mixture is solid remove the bowl from the fridge. Taking a hand mixer beat the mixture in the bowl until it is fluffy in texture. Add in the essential oils and vitamin E and mix well. Place in a glass container and store in a cool dry place. Apply to the face focusing on the temples prior to bedtime to help promote rest and relaxation of the mind and body.

PMS Saver Blend

2 drops German chamomile EO

2 drops sage EO

2 drops basil EO

2 drops rosemary EO

Directions: Combine all of the essential oils together in a bowl. Pour the essential oils onto a warm moist hand towel and place on the stomach for 5-10 minutes or longer as needed to help relieve the pain, inflammation and cramping of PMS

Sunburn Salve

10 drops lavender EO

6 drops German chamomile EO

4 drops peppermint EO

4 oz. fractionated coconut oil

Directions: Melt the coconut oil over low heat on the stove. Once melted remove from heat and add in the essential oils. Mix well. Transfer into a 4 oz glass jar and allow to cool. Apply to affected area as needed at least twice a day.

German Chamomile Body Wash

1 cup water

¼ cup raw honey

⅔ cup liquid Castile soap

30 drops German chamomile EO

1 tsp. vitamin E

2 tsp. carrier oil of your choosing (argan, coconut, sesame, sweet almond, jojoba, grapeseed, macadamia)

Directions: Mix all of the above ingredients in a glass bottle and mix well. Shake prior to use.

Bonus ways you can experiment with when it comes to using German chamomile essential oil:

  • To help relieve the symptoms of anxiety and depression add a few drops of German chamomile and rose essential oil to a warm bath or mix and diffuse in a room.
  • To help with motion sickness, inhale a combination of German chamomile, peppermint, lavender and ginger essential oils.
  • Try having some German chamomile tea to help reduce stress, anxiety and depression. It can also help to soothe and calm the stomach.

References:

  1. https://articles.mercola.com/herbal-oils/german-chamomile-oil.aspx
  2. https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/essential-oils/camomile-essential-oil.html
  3. http://www.umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/herb/german-chamomile
  4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3210003/
  5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2995283/
  6. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9703700/
  7. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMHT0025082/
  8. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK92761/
  9. http://essentialoilsanctuary.com/15-benefits-uses-of-german-chamomile-essential-oil-plus-recipes-application-tips/
  10. https://www.mountainroseherbs.com/products/chamomile-blue-essential-oil/profile
  11. http://www.floracopeia.com/Essential-Oils/essential-oils-sub/organic-blue-chamomile-oil.html
  12. https://www.aromaweb.com/essential-oils/german-chamomile-oil.asp
  13. https://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-951-german%20chamomile.aspx?activeingredientid=951&
  14. Steven D. Ehrlich, NMD, Solutions Acupuncture, a private practice specializing in complementary and alternative medicine, Phoenix, AZ. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network.
  15. Salvatore Battaglia, The Complete Guide to Aromatherapy(Australia: The Perfect Potion, 2003), 180.
  16. Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 56-67.
  17. Shirley Price, The Aromatherapy Workbook (Hammersmith, London: Thorsons, 1993), 54-5.
  18. Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young, Essential Oil Safety (Second Edition. United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier, 2014), 243.
  19. Ali-Shtayeh MS, Yaniv Z, Mahajna J. Ethnobotanical survey in the Palestinian area: a classification of the healing potential of medicinal plants. J Ethnopharmacol. 2000;73(1-2):221-232.
  20. Amsterdam JD, Shults J, Soeller I, Mao JJ, Rockwell K, Newberg AB. Chamomile (Matricaria recutita) may provide antidepressant activity in anxious, depressed humans: an exploratory study. Altern Ther Health Med. 2012 Sep-Oct;18(5):44-9.
  21. Amsterdam JD, Yimei L, Soeller I, et al. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of oral Matricaria recutita (chamomile) extract therapy for generalized anxiety disorder. J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2009;29(4):378-382.
  22. Avallone R, Zanoli P, Puia G, et al. Pharmacological profile of apigenin, a flavonoid isolated from Matricaria chamomilla. Biochem Pharmacol. 2000;59(11):1387-1394.
  23. Blumenthal M, Goldberg A, Brinckmann J. Herbal Medicine: Expanded Commission E Monographs. Newton, MA: Integrative Medicine Communications; 2000:57-61.
  24. de la Torre Morin F, Sanchez Machin I, Garcia Robaina JC, et al. Clinical cross-reactivity between Artemisia vulgaris and Matricaria chamomilla (chamomile). J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol. 2001;11(2):118-122.
  25. Foti C, Nettis E, Panebianco R, et al. Contact urticaria from Matricaria chamomilla. Contact Dermatitis. 2000;42(6):360-361.
  26. Gyllenhaal C. Efficacy and safety of herbal stimulants and sedatives in sleep disorders. Sleep Med Rev. 2000;4(2).
  27. Heck AM, DeWitt BA, Lukes AL. Potential interactions between alternative therapies and warfarin. Am J Health Syst Pharm. 2000;57(13):1221-1227.
  28. Khayyal MT, el-Ghazaly MA, Kenawy SA, et al. Antiulcerogenic effect of some gastrointestinally acting plant extracts and their combination. Arzneimittelforschung. 2001;51(7):545-553.
  29. Martins MD, Marques MM, Bussadori SK, Martins MA, Pavesi VC, Mesquita-Ferrari RA, Fernandes KP. Comparative analysis between Chamomilla recutita and corticosteroids on wound healing. An in vitro and in vivo study. Phytother Res. 2009 Feb;23(2):274-8.
  30. Mazokopakis EE, Vrentzos GE, Papadakis JA, et al. Wild chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.) mouthwashes in methotrexate-induced oral mucositis. Phytomedicine. 2005 Jan;12(1-2):25-7.
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  38. Viola H, Wasowski C, Levi de Stein M, et al. Apigenin, a component of Matricaria recutita flowers, is a central benzodiazepine receptors-ligand with anxiolytic effects. Planta Med. 1995;61(3):213-216.
  39. Zick SM, Wright BD, Sen A, Arnedt JT. Preliminary examination of the efficacy and safety of a standardized chamomile extract for chronic primary insomnia: a randomized placebo-controlled pilot study. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2011 Sep 22;11:78. doi: 10.1186/1472-6882-11-78.

Buttermilk

Buttermilk (aka Chaas)

Buttermilk is a milk product or dairy ingredient which widely used in the food industry since it contains emulsifying properties and it can enhance the flavor of the food. Commercial buttermilk which we found in market is categorized as sweet buttermilk. The sweet buttermilk is a by-product from the churning process of sweet cream into butter. Buttermilk has sour characteristic taste due to the lactic acid which formed during the process of culturing by bacteria.

You will find dried buttermilk in Mother Jai’s Mineral Milk Bath.

Nutrition Facts

Buttermilk itself is prepared by churning the curd of milk and it is considered a good after-dinner-drink especially after the consumption of heavy foods like vegetables, meats, and grains. Here is the list of nutrients in 100 g buttermilk (percent daily value are based on 2000 calories diet)

  • Energy 40kcal
  • Carbohydrates 4.8 gr
  • Fat 0.9 gr
  • Protein 3.3 gr
  • Calcium 116 mg/12% DV (Daily Value)
  • Potassium 54 mg
  • Cholesterol 10 mg
  • Magnesium 8 % DV
  • Folate 4 % DV
  • Zinc 8 % DV
  • Riboflavin 20% DV
  • Vitamin B6 4 % DV
  • Vitamin B12 10% DV
  • Vitamin A 1 % DV
  • Vitamin C 4 % DV
  • Iron 1 % DV

Health benefits of Buttermilk

Buttermilk provides many nutrients to the body that provide multiple health benefits. It can stimulate digestion function and it also can be used to treat of many disorders including abdominal disorders.

Promote healthy digestion: Buttermilk contains probiotic which can promote healthy digestion. Buttermilk contains prebiotic which known as a substance that can enhance the growth of good bacteria inside the colon. These bacteria will keep the intestine and the digestion tract healthy and prevent it from any infection that caused by pathogen microorganism such as Helicobacter pylori. These bacteria are the common cause of stomach or gut ulcer.

Boost immune system: Not only enhance the function of digestion system, the prebiotic content of buttermilk also can promote the body immune system against infection of pathogens. Buttermilk also contains zinc, a mineral that can improve the immune system response and strengthen the immune cells together with Vitamin C.

Maintain strong bones: Calcium is a mineral that effective in maintain the bone mass and keep it strong. Buttermilk contains high level of calcium which can help keep the bone from losing its mass and maintain the bone structure.

Make a glowing skin: Buttermilk will enrich your skin with dozens of nutrients and it will make your skin glow. Buttermilk not only used in food commercial product but it also used in the cosmetic and skin care products. It contains protein, vitamin C and antioxidant that can nourish the skin and make it clearer.

Promotes healthy pregnancy: During pregnancy, mom needs more nutrients to enhance her health and promote the development of her baby. Buttermilk contains protein and other nutrient and prebiotic which can keep mother from suffering any illness or disease. It also contains folate that improve the brain and organs development of the fetus inside the womb. Taking buttermilk once a day is beneficial to both mother and baby.

Treat upset stomach: If you are feeling sick after enjoying spicy food or even bad or spoiled food, try buttermilk. Buttermilk contain protein and amino acids which can bind chemical or harmful substances within the food and protect the stomach lining from infection.

Keeping healthy heart: Heart is one of the most vital organ of human body and it also needs to be nourished. Buttermilk contains some potassium which plays important role in maintaining normal heart beat and helps the body control blood pressure.

Lowering cholesterol: Even though buttermilk has creamy texture and taste it doesn’t contain high amounts of cholesterol. According to study, buttermilk contains milk protein globule that can bind the cholesterol and prevent it from entering the blood vessel and causing atherosclerosis. If you consume a heavy food that contains high amount of cholesterol, consuming buttermilk after eating will significantly help you to stabilize the cholesterol inside the body.

Rehydrate the body: The nutrients in buttermilk assist the body in rehydration. One half cup with sunstroke or dehydration will have you back to feeling good in no time.

Maintain normal metabolism: Metabolism is a body process to produce energy and it required the presence of some metabolic enzymes. Buttermilk contains some nutrients including Vitamin B6, Vitamin B12, and other B Vitamins that are the component of metabolic enzymes produced by the body. Without the existence of these substances, the body can’t produce the energy needed for maintaining all body cells.

Treat insomnia: Buttermilk contains magnesium that can help the body to relieve some types of sleep deprivation or sleep disorders like insomnia. Magnesium is a mineral that play important role in controlling nervous system and it help to soothe and relax the nerves within the brain. Consume buttermilk one hour before going to sleep.

Improve healthy vision: Not only does it contain protein, fat and other nutrients, buttermilk is also complete with Vitamin A which is mostly required to keep healthy function of retina or eyes. Consuming buttermilk regularly will also help to prevent any eyes disorders like age related macular degeneration.

Treat sunburn: Buttermilk contains smoothing and calming properties that help to treat sunburns. Apply directly to sunburn or pour in bath the soothe burned skin.

Treat diarrhea: It is mentioned in a study that the milk fat content in buttermilk is effective in adding bulk to stool and loosen it so it will be easy to pass the colon. Buttermilk has been used as an Ayurvedic medication for thousands of years to treat diarrhea and other digestive problems.

Prevent anemia: Buttermilk contains iron that plays important role in the red blood cells formation and function. Without the presence of iron, the body can’t form a healthy red blood cell and it will cause poor oxygen and nutrient transport within the body which leads to anemia.

Prevent cancer: Buttermilk contains anti-inflammatory properties and provides antioxidant affects that can help prevent the development of cancer cells.

Moisturize dry hair: Buttermilk can be used in hair treatment as hair mask and it will result in a smooth and shiny hair. Just apply some buttermilk on your hair and leave it for 15 minutes. Rinse it out with warm water. The protein and other nutrients within the buttermilk will nourish your dry hair and make it supple and smooth.

Homemade buttermilk is very easy to make and tastes excellent in pancakes and other flour-based foods. To make buttermilk at home, use the following steps.

  1. Mix 1 cup of milk with 1 cup of lemon juice. Use a milk product with a higher fat content, such as 2 percent milk, whole milk or cream.
  2. Let the milk and lemon juice mixture sit for up to 10 minutes. The milk should start to thicken and curdle.
  3. Substitute the commercial buttermilk for the homemade buttermilk in any recipe that calls for the ingredient.

Another method of making buttermilk involves churning heavy cream into solids and liquids. To use this method, blend some cream in a food processor or mixer until it separates. Strain the solids through some cheesecloth and use the strained buttermilk in any recipe that calls for the ingredient. Rinse out the solids well and set them aside. The solids create an excellent homemade butter that can keep for several weeks.

If homemade or commercial buttermilk are not available, yogurt or sour cream can make good substitutes in recipes that call for the ingredient.

References:

  1. http://food.ndtv.com/beauty/12-incredible-benefits-of-buttermilk-for-hair-and-skin-adding-chaas-to-your-beauty-regime-1679951
  2. http://www.wildturmeric.net/2015/06/buttermilk-benefits-health-skin-hair.html
  3. http://www.livestrong.com/article/411954-how-to-lighten-skin-with-milk/
  4. http://www.southernliving.com/fashion-beauty/beauty-makeup/buttermilk-your-secret-beauty-weapon
  5. https://drhealthbenefits.com/food-bevarages/processed-food/health-benefits-of-buttermilk
  6. https://www.hindawi.com/journals/isrn/2013/481651/
  7. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4815005/
  8. https://nccih.nih.gov/health/probiotics/introduction.htm
  9. http://jfoodprotection.org/doi/abs/10.4315/0022-2747-35.5.302?code=fopr-site

Blue Tansy

Blue Tansy essential oil (Tanacetum anuum)

Blue Tansy Oil is a luxurious oil that is cherished for its captivating scent and incredible clearing, calming properties. This oil has a rich blue hue and a sweet, fresh scent. Blue Tansy provides unmatched relief for many people who suffer during high-pollen seasons, soothes troubled skin and supports self-esteem, confidence and enthusiasm year-round. However, Blue Tansy Oil is produced from a seasonal crop that requires optimal conditions, and therefore available quantities can be limited.

The health benefits of Tansy Essential Oil can be attributed to its properties as an antibacterial, anti-fungal, anti-inflammatory, anti-histaminic, antiviral, febrifuge, insecticide, hormone stimulant, sedative, and vermifuge substance.

Tansy is a common European herb and the scientific name of Tansy is Tanacetum Vulgare or Tanacetum Annuum. The essential oil of Tansy is extracted by steam distillation of all the plant parts. The chief components that form this essential oil are artemisone, borneol, camphone, camphor, isopinocamphone, piperitone, and thujone.

Major Constituents: Chamazulene, B-Myrcene, Camphor, Sabinene, B-Eudesmol, 3,6-Dihydrochamazulene, B-Pinene, a-Phellandrene [B.M. Lawrence, Progress in Essential Oils. (Perfumer & Flavorist 26 no. 1, 2001), 48-51. Source cited in Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young, Essential Oil Safety (Second Edition. United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier, 2014), 224.]

Tansy essential oil and blue tansy essential oil are very different in their chemical make-up, and subsequent use, despite the fact that they both belong to the Asteraceae plant family. In addition, blue tansy can also be known by the synonyms Moroccan blue chamomile and Moroccan tansy, adding to further confusion with another essential oil.

A Few Words of Caution: Tansy oil is a potent poison due to presence of high concentration of thujone and even small doses can be fatal. It can also trigger hallucinations and severe nervous or neurotic disturbances, while having addictive, narcotic effects.

Although this herb is very poisonous, it was still popular among the poor people, villagers, and nomadic groups like Gypsies, since they found some medicinal uses of the plant. Let us explore some of the medicinal properties that gave this plant recognition as a medicinal plant, despite being so poisonous.

Blending: The Essential Oil of Tansy blends well with those of cedar wood, helichrysum, lavender, ravensara, and rosemary.

Blue Tansy Essential Oil Benefits

Prevents Bacterial Infections: It should not be very hard to understand that the essential oil, which is so poisonous and can be fatal to humans, would also be deadly for those tiny bacteria. Although some bacteria can survive unimaginable extremities of temperature and toxins, for most of the bacteria which live in the human body, this oil is lethal. It kills them and inhibits their multiplication. This gives effective protection against bacterial infections, provided that it is used in very, very mild doses.

Protects Against Fungal Infections: There is little doubt that the essential oil, which can kill some very hardy species of bacteria infecting the human body. Fungus cannot stand the toxicity of this oil and are killed when subjected to this oil. Their spores are also destroyed. This makes this oil an efficient protector against fungal infections, which cause skin diseases, running ears, hair problems, and dysentery.

Reduces Inflammation: The Essential Oil of Tansy has been found to be effective in giving relief from inflammation, particularly those pertaining to the skin, and others as well. It also gives relief, to some extent, from inflammation in the respiratory, digestive, and nervous systems.

Controls Allergic Reactions: Histamine in the body is responsible for triggering allergies and the various problems related to allergies, such as rashes, itches, severe coughs, asthma, breathing troubles, continuous sneezes, or hiccups. Allergies can turn seriously fatal if they take over the internal organs, particularly the liver and heart. These attacks of allergies can be countered by lowering the levels of histamine in the body and checking its production. Tansy Essential Oil neutralizes histamine and checks its further production, thereby controlling these allergic reactions.

Protects against Viral Diseases: The components like thujone and camphor, being toxic to living cells, are capable of killing viruses as well. These components rupture the cyst, probe inside, and kill the virus. This stops the growth of the virus and gives immunity against viral diseases like the common cold, mumps, measles, and pox.

Reduces Fevers: Most fevers are actually indications of the ongoing fight between the body’s immune mechanism and infection by bacteria (like typhoid, yellow fever, and black fever), viruses (like influenza), protozoa (like malaria and a few others) and fungi. The more severe our body’s reaction, the higher the body temperature becomes. Therefore, if infections are causes for fevers, then inhibiting these infections would be the way to reduce fevers. The Essential Oil of Tansy, being an antibacterial, anti-fungal, and antiviral substance, all at the same time, assists our body in countering these infections and thereby reduces body temperature. The anti-inflammatory property of this oil adds to this effect, since inflammation can also raise body temperature.

Acts as an Insecticide: Insects like cockroaches, ants, termites, and moths that are very commonly found in our households, and parasitic insects like mosquitoes, fleas, ticks, lice, and bed bugs, prefer to keep a safe distance from this oil as it is poisonous to them and has a pungent aroma that they cannot withstand. Therefore, this oil serves as an effective insect repellent when used in fumigants, vapourizers, and sprays. Even smaller animals like wall lizards and mice avoid this oil.

Stimulates Secretion of Hormones: Tansy Oil stimulates the endocrine glands and increases the secretion of hormones. It was found particularly effective on the thyroid and thymus glands, which directly affect growth and maturity.

Relieves Nervous Afflictions: This oil acts as a sedative for nerves and emotional impulses. In cases of anxiety, depression, anger, convulsions, nervous afflictions, epilepsy, hysteric attacks, and impulsive behavior, it can be used to pacify them and induce a relaxing effect on the nerves and the brain.

Kills Intestinal Worms: The poisonous effect of this oil kills the intestinal and other parasitic worms in the human body, such as round worms, tape worms, hook worms, and others. It is also used to kill worms that develop in wounds. This helps in the regrowth of healthy cells and quicker healing of wounds.

Other Benefits: It is also used to treat sciatica, dyspepsia, skin infections, and can help prevent miscarriages

References:

  1. https://www.planttherapy.com/blue-tansy-essential-oil
  2. https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/essential-oils/health-benefits-of-tansy-essential-oil.html
  3. https://ncit.nci.nih.gov/ncitbrowser/ConceptReport.jsp?dictionary=NCI_Thesaurus&version=16.11d&ns=NCI_Thesaurus&code=C72202
  4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21592001
  5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18283947
  6. https://healthyfocus.org/blue-tansy-essential-oil-benefits/
  7. http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-686-tansy.aspx?activeingredientid=686&activeingredientname=tansy
  8. Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young, Essential Oil Safety (Second Edition. United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier, 2014), 438-439.
  9. Eden Botanicals website, Blue Tansy, accessed July 27, 2015
  10. Lawless, Julia, 1995, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils, UK: Thorsons
  11. Rose, Jeanne, 1999, 375 Essential Oils and Hydrosols, US: Frog Ltd. Books
  12. Schnaubelt, Kurt, 1998, Advanced Aromatherapy: The Science of Essential Oil Therapy, US: Healing Arts Press

Black Pepper

Black pepper essential oil (Piper nigrum) is steam-distilled from the berries (peppercorn) of the Piperceae. Although black pepper itself is frequently used, the oil is not so widely known. However, it’s an oil high in monoterpenes, a chemical constituent known to have a powerful impact on the body in many ways. The aroma of black pepper is spicy, musky, warm, and peppery.

Find it in Mother Jai’s Aroma Sprays, Warming Pain Relief & Arthritis Relief Oils.

The warm, mild aroma of Black Pepper will remind you of freshly ground peppercorns combined with a soft floral scent. While you may not desire to diffuse it by itself, it can spice up your favorite diffuser blend. Black Pepper is an excellent choice to help in reducing occasional discomfort after exercise or easing achy joints that are associated with normal aging or wear and tear.

Therapeutically, black pepper oil is mostly used as a supplement for digestive and nervous system support and wellness. For this reason many people will use the oil as a flavoring in their cooking, just as you might with crushed black pepper. However, the ratios will be MUCH different. You wouldn’t use a full teaspoon of black pepper oil (yikes!!), but rather start off with a drop, to find the right amounts for your recipes.

Plant Description

Native to India, the black pepper plant is a climbing vine that can grow up to 10 meters high. The stem of the black pepper plant grows into a plentiful green column as the many shoots that grow from the stem begin to produce green, almond-shaped leaves. Growing next to these luscious leaves are clustered flowers and the fruit of the plant—the peppers. The peppers, or fruits, are round and can grow to be approximately 6 mm in diameter. These fruits turn from green to red and are picked at various times of their ripening stages to produce varying types of peppers. In order to produce black pepper, these tiny and rotund fruits are typically picked when they are fully grown, shiny, and green.

Chemistry of Black Pepper Essential Oil

Main Chemical Components: Caryophyllene, limonene, carene, sabinene

Black Pepper essential oil contains a high amount of natural chemicals that can support and protect the human body. Some of the most prominent chemicals are monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, which are known for their antioxidant activity when ingested. These chemicals also help support the immune system.

Oils that Blend Well with Black Pepper Essential Oil

Black Pepper essential oil blends well with Bergamot, Clary Sage, Frankincense, Geranium, Lavender, Clove, Juniper Berry, Sandalwood, and Cedarwood essential oils for diffusion.

Primary Benefits

  • Rich source of antioxidants
  • Supports healthy circulation
  • Aids digestion
  • Enhances food flavor
  • Soothes anxious feelings

Emotional Benefits

Aromatically, black pepper essential oil helps people to examine things with clarity and honesty. It allows a person to take off their own facade or mask, share their true thoughts and emotions, and unblock the flow of growth in this way. It might help a person who is dealing with repressed memories or emotions, allowing them to dig deep into their past or their present experiences. It can help you uncover hidden truths or face patterns or habits with courage.

Other Benefits

Black pepper oil is rich in certain useful minerals and vitamins too. For example, there is vitamin-A (Beta Carotene), which is very beneficial for ocular health as well as for antioxidant activity. It has vitamin-K, which is essential for maintaining proper circulatory and metabolic functions, muscles, and bones. Furthermore, it has calcium, potassium and selenium. While calcium is good for bones and potassium for regulating blood pressure, selenium is essentially required for the proper formation of bones, nails, hair follicles and teeth, as well as for proper functioning of the brain.

In Other Words It’s Really Good For:

  1. Cognitive support and brain health. [Dorene Petersen, Presentation: Clinical Use of Aromatherapy for Brain Health: 7 Essential Oils. August 9, 2017, New Brunswick, NJ. Alliance of International Aromatherapists 2017 Conference. AIA 2017 Conference Proceedings page 221-222.]
  2. Aching muscles, arthritis, chilblains, constipation, muscle cramps, poor circulation, sluggish digestion. [Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 56-64.]

Black Pepper Essential Oil Uses

  1. Ability to provide warm sensations when applied topically. This factor makes it a perfect oil to use in a relaxing massage blend. Create your own warming and soothing massage blend by combining one to two drops of Black Pepper essential oil with a carrier oil. Using Black Pepper essential oil in a massage blend not only provides warm sensations during a massage, its aromatic components also help enhance your relaxing experience.
  2. Improves Circulation. When black pepper essential oil is taken internally, it promotes healthy circulation and stimulates mucus and bile flow. It has warming properties when taken internally and applied topically. Mix black pepper oil with cinnamon or turmeric essential oil to enhance these circulatory activities.
  3. Helps the body kill cancer cells. According to a 2010 study conducted at Michigan State University, black pepper oil and its constituents exhibit anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anticancer activities. All compounds derived from black pepper suppressed human cancer cell proliferation, with peperine being the most effective compound.
  4. Need a good way to calm unwanted anxiety? Black Pepper essential oil is a great way to relieve anxious feelings. When used aromatically, Black Pepper essential oil can help soothe tightened emotions. To relieve yourself of anxious feelings, place a few drops of Black Pepper essential oil into a diffuser or inhale it directly to receive its aromatic benefits. Dilute 1 drop and rub over the heart center as desired for emotional support.
  5. Black Pepper is a powerful essential oil with amazing uses and benefits. With the right combination of essential oils, its effects can be amplified. When you combine Black Pepper essential oil with Juniper Berry oil and/or Cedarwood oil, it can help produce a calming and grounding effect on your senses and emotions, and can help you de-stress and relax.
  6. Contains many natural chemicals that are important in supporting natural functions of the body. Some of these chemicals include monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, which are known for their antioxidant activity when ingested. To provide your body with greater antioxidant support, put one or two drops of Black Pepper essential oil into a Veggie Capsule and take internally.
  7. Enjoy your favorite seasons with good health by using Black Pepper essential oil. Because Black Pepper has certain natural chemicals such as monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, it can support the immune system when needed most. To better protect your health, take one to two drops of Black Pepper essential oil in a Veggie Capsule when seasonal threats are high. Research published in Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology found that black pepper extract contains anti-virulence properties, meaning it targets bacterial virulence without affecting cell viability, which may be less prone to the development of drug resistance. The study showed that after screening 83 essential oils: black pepper, cananga and myrrh oil inhibited staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation and almost abolished the hemolytic (destruction of red blood cells) activity of S. aureus.
  8. To soothe muscles and joints or to warm the skin during cold weather. Because of its warming, anti-inflammatory and antispasmodic properties, black pepper oil works to reduce muscle injuries, tendinitis, and symptoms of arthritis and rheumatism. A 2014 study published in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine assessed the efficacy of aromatic essential oils on neck pain. When patients applied a cream composed of black pepper, marjoram, lavender and peppermint essential oils to the neck daily for a four-week period, the group reported improved pain tolerance and significant improvement of neck pain.
  9. Use to quit smoking. Black pepper oil may help reduce cravings for cigarettes and symptoms of anxiety in smokers deprived from smoking. A 1994 study published in Drug and Alcohol Dependence found that black pepper oil can suppress certain smoking withdrawal symptoms, including cravings for cigarettes. Forty-eight cigarette smokers participated in a three-hour session conducted after overnight deprivation from smoking. The participants were divided into three groups: One group of smokers puffed on a device that delivered a vapor from black pepper essential oil, a second group puffed on a device with a mint/menthol cartridge and a third group used a device containing an empty cartridge. After puffing and inhaling from the devices throughout the session, reported cravings for cigarettes were significantly reduced in the black pepper group relative to each of the two control groups.  In addition, negative effects and symptoms of anxiety were alleviated in the black pepper, and participants reported that the intensity of sensations in the chest was significantly higher with the black pepper cartilage. This study suggests that respiratory tract sensations are important in alleviating smoking withdrawal symptoms and cigarette substitutes delivering black pepper constituents may prove useful in smoking cessation treatment. Black pepper oil is also among the best essential oils for anxiety and nervous conditions.
  10. Improves digestion. Black pepper oil may help ease the discomfort of constipation, diarrhea and gas. A range of studies has shown that it exhibits antidiarrheal, gastro-protective, antidiarrheal and antispasmodic activities. Black pepper does this by stimulating the stomach to increase hydrochloric acid secretion, which is necessary for proper digestion. Black pepper has been used to effectively treat IBS symptoms as well as bladder dysfunctions.
  11. Lowers Cholesterol. A 2002 study on the hypolipidemic (lipid-lowering) effect of black pepper in rats fed a high-fat diet showed a decrease in the levels of cholesterol, free fatty acids, phospholipids and triglycerides. Researchers found that supplementation with black pepper elevated the concentration of HDL cholesterol and reduced the concentration of LDL cholesterol and VLDL cholesterol in the plasma of rats fed high-fat foods. Use black pepper essential oil internally to reduce high triglycerides and improve your total cholesterol levels.
  12. Stimulates appetite. Research shows that olfactory stimulation using black pepper essential oil, which is a strong appetite stimulant, can facilitate swallowing in people with neurological disorders. Inhalation and ingestion of black pepper oil activates the insular or orbitofrontal cortex, resulting in improvement of the reflexive swallowing movement. In 2008, the effects of olfactory stimulation with black pepper oil were investigated in pediatric patients receiving long-term enteral nutrition (feeding with liquid supplements or tube feeding) due to neurological disorders. In eight out of 10 patients, black pepper oil intervention was continued for three months, and five patients showed increases in the amount of oral intake — plus black pepper treatment helped facilitate swallowing movement.
  13. Helps the body detoxify.  Black pepper oil creates a warming sensation when applied topically, so it increases sweating. It also serves as a diuretic and increases urination, helping remove bodily toxins and excess water from the body. This reduces swelling and inflammation; plus it can help lower blood pressure naturally. A 2013 study published in Cell Biochemistry and Biophysics found that piperine supplementation helped normalize blood pressure, improve glucose tolerance (giving you normal blood sugar levels), reduce inflammation and improve liver function in rats fed a high-fat diet. These changes clearly suggest that peperine reduces symptoms of human metabolic syndrome by helping the body to remove toxins and reduce inflammation.
  14. Diaphoretic & Diuretic. Black pepper oil, when ingested, increases sweating and urination. Both of these properties play an important role in the removal of toxins from the body, clearing of the pores on the skin, and disinfecting the body. Sweating and urinating help eliminate extra water and fat from the body, thereby reducing weight, lowering blood pressure and making the body very relaxed. These properties are also helpful for reducing inflammation.
  15. Stimulates energy production. Black Pepper Oil is stimulating and is a good choice for inclusion in blends intended to help enhance alertness and stamina. Black Pepper should be avoided before bedtime. Consider massaging 1-2 drops into the soles of the feet daily, or diffusing as needed for increased energy.

Inspiration for Using Black Pepper Essential Oil

For a muscle rub: In a 5 ml roller bottle; add 5 drops Peppermint, 3 drops Clove, 5 drops Wintergreen and 3 drops Black Pepper essential oils. Top with FCO.

To summon inner strength, diffuse; 2 drops Basil, 2 drops Bergamot, 1 drop Cinnamon, 1 drop Lemon and 1 drop Black Pepper.

Blend into coconut oil or basic salve recipe to warm and promote circulation.

Cautions

If taken in large quantities, it may cause uneasiness, unrest, vomiting, loose motions, irritation and inflammation of the intestines, sleeplessness, overheating, and smelling strongly of pepper. However, there is nothing serious about these symptoms. Keep pepper away from the eyes and nose, as it may cause irritation, sneezing, and burning. Possible skin sensitivity. Keep out of reach of children. If you are pregnant, nursing, or under a doctor’s care, consult your physician. Avoid contact with eyes, inner ears, and sensitive areas.

References:

  1. http://www.sustainablebabysteps.com/black-pepper-essential-oil.html
  2. https://www.planttherapy.com/black-pepper-essential-oil?v=1406
  3. https://www.doterra.com/US/en/blog/spotlight-black-pepper-oil
  4. https://draxe.com/black-pepper-essential-oil/
  5. https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/essential-oils/health-benefits-of-black-pepper-essential-oil.html
  6. https://healthytraditions.com/healthytraditions/essential-oils/
  7. https://www.aromaweb.com/essential-oils/black-pepper-oil.asp
  8. https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0443062412/aromaweb
  9. https://www.aromaweb.com/books/worwood.asp
  10. https://www.aromaweb.com/books/complete-aromatherapy-essential-oils-handbook-purchon-cantele.asp
  11. https://www.aromaweb.com/books/heart-of-aromatherapy-andrea-butje.asp
  12. https://www.aromaweb.com/books/lawless.asp
  13. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23768180
  14. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26396402
  15. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18441508
  16. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22038304
  17. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23625885
  18. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8033760
  19. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20839630
  20. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3083808/
  21. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25027570
  22. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3083808/#R48
  23. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1576058/
  24. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20828313
  25. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25192562
  26. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17987447

Bergamot

Bergamot (Citrus bergamia)

Other Names: Aceite de Bergamota, Bergamot, Bergamot Orange, Bergamota, Bergamotier, Bergamoto, Bergamotte, Bergamotto Bigarade Orange, Citrus Bergamia, Citrus aurantium var. bergamia, Huile de Bergamote, Oleum Bergamotte.

HERBAL MISCELLANY: Despite the fact that the bergamot fruit is inedible, the oil has many culinary and house hold uses. It is the characteristic flavor of Earl Grey tea, and is used as a fragrance for pipe tobaccos.

Bergamot Essential Oil –

Common Method of Extraction: Cold Pressed or Steam Distilled (less frequently)

Plant Part Typically Used: Citrus Rind (Peel)

Oil Color: Green/Golden

Aromatic Description: Fresh, orange/lemon/citrusy, slightly floral.

Bergamot Oil Uses: Acne, abscesses, anxiety, boils, cold sores, cystitis, depression, halitosis, itching, loss of appetite, oily skin, psoriasis, stress.

Major Constituents: (+)-Limonene, Linalyl acetate, Linalool, Sabinene, Gamma-Terpinene, Bergapten

BLENDS WELL WITH: Chamomile, citrus oils, coriander, cypress, geranium, helichrysum, jasmine, juniper, lavender, lemon balm, neroli, nutmeg, rose, sandalwood, vetiver, violet, ylang ylang

Bergamot is a plant that produces a type of citrus fruit. Oil taken from the peel of the fruit is used to make medicine. Some people treat a skin condition called psoriasis by applying bergamot oil directly to the skin and then shining long-wave ultraviolet (UV) light on the affected area. Bergamot oil is also applied to the skin (used topically) for a tumor caused by a fungal infection (mycosis fungoides) and for pigment loss (vitiligo). It is also used as an insecticide to protect the body against lice and other parasites. Bergamot oil is sometimes inhaled (used as aromatherapy) to reduce anxiety during radiation treatment. In foods, bergamot oil is widely used as a citrus flavoring agent, especially in gelatins and puddings. In manufacturing, bergamot oil is used in perfumes, creams, lotions, soaps, and suntan oils.

Healing with Bergamot

  • releases emotional pain
  • works as a powerful antidepressant
  • relieves joint and muscle pain
  • aids digestive system
  • soothes skin irritations
  • works as a sedative
  • cleanses oily skin
  • kills germs and bacteria
  • relieves stress
  • reduces cough

Analgesic: Bergamot essential oil reduces the feeling of pain in the body. Actually, it stimulates secretion of certain hormones which lessen the sensitivity of nerves to pain. Therefore, it is very helpful in case of headaches, sprains, muscle aches or any other symptoms or ailments which require a heavy dosage of analgesic pills. This means that you can avoid the dangerous side effects of many over the counter pain medicines, which often have adverse side effects and can damage your liver and kidneys, as well as cause blood thinning and insomnia.

Antispasmodic: It relaxes nerves and muscles, thereby giving quick relief for cramps, convulsions, and painful muscle contractions. This can also be important for people with chronic coughing or respiratory conditions, as well as asthma, which is similar to a spasmodic reaction.

Antiseptic & Vulnerary: The same disinfectant and antibiotic properties of bergamot oil make it a good antiseptic agent. It not only promotes fast healing of wounds, cracks on the skin and heels, ulcers, eczema, and itching but also protects wounds from becoming septic and developing deadly tetanus. It not only treats and heals the effects of other infections but inhibits the formation of new ones.

Cicatrisant: This property of bergamot oil is the reason behind its extensive use in cosmetics and skin care products such as beauty soaps, creams, and lotions. Cicatrisant means a property or an agent which helps scars and other marks on the skin to disappear. It also makes the distribution of pigments and melanin uniform, resulting in the fading away of marks and an even, attractive skin tone. This essential oil is commonly used to eliminate the unsightly effects of acne, which can leave noticeable scars and marks on the affected areas for many years.

Digestive: As discussed above, bergamot essential oil activates and increases secretions of the digestive acids, enzymes, and bile and facilitates digestion. It also synchronizes and regulates the peristaltic motion of the intestines and in this way, it quickens the digestive process and reduces strain to the intestinal tract. In this way, bergamot essential oil can reduce constipation, make bowel movements regular, and prevent gastrointestinal complications like colorectal cancer and other uncomfortable or dangerous conditions.

Deodorant: This property of bergamot oil is popular among the younger generation who is always trying new deodorants, searching for something refreshing and natural. Bergamot essential oil is an excellent deodorant. Its refreshing aroma and disinfectant properties, which inhibit the growth of germs causing body-odor, make it an effective and attractive delivery system as a deodorant. Citrus smells are very powerful and can overcome or eliminate many other odors, which is why Bergamot oil is also used in room fresheners and sprays.

Febrifuge: A febrifuge is a substance or an agent that reduces fever and lowers body temperature. Bergamot is a good febrifuge for a number of reasons. First of all, as an antibiotic, it fights infections that arise from viruses, bacteria, and protozoa that cause fever, including influenza (virus), malaria (protozoa) and typhoid (typhus bacteria). Secondly, it stimulates the metabolic system and gland secretions, thereby providing a feeling of warmth and resulting in additional secretion (perspiration or sweat) from the Eccrine glands (sweat glands) and sebaceous (sebum) glands, thus reducing body temperature. This can also reduce the toxicity of the body through perspiration, and clean out the glands and pores of any foreign toxins that can result in a variety of skin conditions.

Relaxant & Sedative: The flavonoids present in Bergamot oil are very good relaxants as well. They soothe nerves and reduce nervous tension, anxiety, and stress, all of which can help cure or treat ailments associated with stress such as high blood pressure, insomnia, and depression. They can also stimulate the activity of certain hormones in the body, which induce feelings of relaxation and sedation, like dopamine and serotonin.

Vermifuge: It kills worms, and it is a subtle and fragrant choice for children who have contracted worms. It can also be applied on unhealthy, infected teeth or used as a mouthwash to kill oral germs and protect teeth from the development of cavities. Intestinal worms can result in malnourishment and other serious deficiencies including various forms of anemia, so eliminating these worms, particularly in growing children, is a very important application of bergamot essential oil.

Other Benefits: Bergamot essential oil is also a tonic, which means that it tones up the respiratory, circulatory, digestive, excretory, and nervous system, as well as skin and muscles. It is also anti-congestive and is used in vaporizers to relieve congestion and respiratory problems, particularly during coughs and colds. It works as an expectorant to loosen up phlegm and mucus in the respiratory tracts and helps the body to eliminate through natural avenues like sneezing and coughs, thereby reducing the total amount of material and eliminating some of the germs and toxins that caused the condition in the first place.

Medical Uses for Bergamot

  • Anxiety during radiation treatment. Developing evidence suggests that inhaling bergamot oil as aromatherapy does help reduce anxiety in people receiving radiation treatment.
  • Assists in alleviating symptoms and complications of bacterial infections – According to a study published in the April 2009 issue of the Journal of Applied Microbiology, bergamot oil can produce positive results against Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis bacteria that are resistant to the potent antibiotic vancomycin. These enterococcal species are a common source of a variety of infections, including urinary tract infections (UTI), bacteremia, endocarditis, and meningitis. Just add bergamot oil to your sitz bath or hip bath to help prevent the spread of bacterial infections from the urethra into the bladder.
  • Acts as a substitute for statins – A newly published research in the Journal of Natural Products revealed that citrus bergamot has statin-like principles and carries the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric acid (HMG) moiety. Today, 1 in 4 Americans over age 45 now takes cholesterol-lowering drugs known as statins, typically for the primary prevention of heart attacks and strokes. If you’ll ask me, not only is their benefit highly limited to those with a genetic condition, but these drugs come with an avalanche of potential side effects, too. Keep in mind: there are far better ways to prevent heart disease than taking statins or unnecessarily lowering your cholesterol, including eating right, exercising, and maintaining healthy vitamin D levels.
  • Psoriasis, when used along with UV light. Early research suggests that applying bergamot oil to the skin along with UV light is not more effective than UV light alone for reducing plaque psoriasis.
  • Treating a tumor under the skin due to a fungal infection (mycosis fungoides), when used along with ultra-violet (UV) light.
  • Speeds up the healing process for cold sores, mouth ulcers, and herpes – Bergamot oil has a similar antibacterial effect on shingles and chickenpox, which are also caused by the varicella zoster virus from herpes. Apply bergamot essential oil topically on affected area until condition improves.
  • Helps prevent and improve skin conditions from fungal infections – In a study published in the Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, Italian researchers have proven bergamot essential oil’s amazing antifungal properties when used as a topical remedy for infections brought by candida fungus strains.
  • Helps reduce anxiety and stress – Experts say that when used in aromatherapy preparations, bergamot oil can help lessen stress and anxiety levels of patients prior to surgery. It also helps relieve depression. Learn how aromatherapy can resolve your anxiety issues.
  • Protecting the body against lice and other worms or parasites.
  • Loss of the color pigment on the skin (vitiligo).

POSSIBLY UNSAFE when used on the skin (topically), because it can make the skin sensitive to the sun and more vulnerable to skin cancer. People who work with bergamot can develop skin problems including blisters, scabs, pigment spots, rashes, sensitivity to the sun, and cancerous changes.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

  • Children: Bergamot oil is POSSIBLY UNSAFE in children when taken by mouth in large amounts. There have been serious side effects, including convulsion and death, in children who have taken large amounts of bergamot oil.
  • Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Do not use bergamot oil on your skin if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. It is POSSIBLY UNSAFE.
  • Diabetes: Bergamot might lower blood sugar levels. This could affect blood sugar control in people with diabetes and cause blood sugar levels to go to low. Monitor your blood sugar closely.
  • Surgery: Bergamot might lower blood sugar. There is some concern that it might interfere with blood sugar control during surgery. Stop using bergamot at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.
  • Medications that increase sensitivity to sunlight (Photosensitizing drugs) interacts with BERGAMOT. Some medications can increase sensitivity to sunlight. Topical use of bergamot oil might also increase your sensitivity to sunlight. Using bergamot oil topically along with medication that increase sensitivity to sunlight could increase the chances of sunburn, blistering or rashes on areas of skin exposed to sunlight. Be sure to wear sunblock and protective clothing when spending time in the sun. Some drugs that cause photosensitivity include amitriptyline (Elavil), Ciprofloxacin (Cipro), norfloxacin (Noroxin), lomefloxacin (Maxaquin), ofloxacin (Floxin), levofloxacin (Levaquin), sparfloxacin (Zagam), gatifloxacin (Tequin), moxifloxacin (Avelox), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (Septra), tetracycline, methoxsalen (8-methoxypsoralen, 8-MOP, Oxsoralen), and Trioxsalen (Trisoralen).

References:

  1. Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 56-67.
  2. B.M. Lawrence, Essential Oils 1981-1987 (Wheaton: Allured Publishing, 1989), 39-40.
  3. B.M. Lawrence, Essential Oils 1988-1991 (Wheaton: Allured Publishing, 1993), 7, 175.
  4. Verzera, A. Trozzi, I. Stagno D’Alcontres, et al., The Composition of the Volatile Fraction of Calabrian Bergamot Essential Oil. (Riv. Ital. EEPOS 25, 1998), 17-38.
  5. P. Dugo, L. Mondello, A.R. Proteggente, et al., Oxygen Heterocyclic Compounds of Bergamot Essential Oils. (Rivista Italiana EPPOS 27, 1999), 31-41.
  6. SCCP, Opinion on Furocoumarins in Cosmetic Products. (Scientific Committee on Consumer Products, 13-Dec.-2005), SCCP/0942/05.
  7. Sources cited in Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young, Essential Oil Safety (Second Edition. United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier, 2014), 211.
  8. Aromatherapy: Essential Oils for Vibrant Health and Beauty, 2002
  9. Encyclopedia of Life
  10. Finding Infinity: An Easy Aromatherapy Guide to Blending Essential Oils, Volume 1, 2010
  11. The Citrus Notes of Fragrance, 2012
  12. Natural Products July 2009, 72(7):1352–1354
  13. The Indigenous Healing Tradition in Calabria, 2004
  14. Applied Microbiology April 2009, 106(4):1343-9
  15. Antimicrobial Chemotherapy June 2008, 61(6):1312-4
  16. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine December 2013, 2013:927419
  17. National Association of Holistic Aromatherapy
  18. Chemistry and Chemical Engineering April 2010, 4(4):60-62
  19. http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-142-BERGAMOT.aspx?
  20. https://suzannerbanks.blog/2014/02/19/10-recipes-with-bergamot-citrus-bergamia/
  21. https://www.mountainroseherbs.com/products/bergamot-essential-oil/profile
  22. http://articles.mercola.com/herbal-oils/bergamot-oil.aspx
  23. https://www.aromaweb.com/essential-oils/bergamot-oil.asp
  24. https://draxe.com/bergamot-oil/
  25. https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/essential-oils/health-benefits-of-bergamot-essential-oil.html

Basil Leaf

Basil Leaf (Ocimum basilicum)

By Castielli – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7133704

Basil Leaf

Sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum) is most known for its culinary uses. It’s highly nutritious with an abundance of vitamin A (as carotenoids), vitamin K, and vitamin C. It’s also rich in magnesium, iron, potassium, and calcium. The fragrant herb Basil is best known as one of the most versatile herbs to use in Mediterranean and Eastern cooking.

½ cup of fresh chopped basil (or about eight tablespoons) has roughly:

  • 2 calories
  • 0 fat, protein, sugar or fiber
  • 56 milligrams vitamin A (24 percent)
  • 88 milligrams vitamin K (108 percent)
  • 0.24 milligrams manganese (12 percent)
  • 4 milligrams vitamin C (8 percent)

Health Benefits of Basil Leaf

Adaptogen: helps the body adapt to stress and to normalize the harmful effects of stressors on bodily processes.

Antibacterial: The basil essential oil was active against every strain of E-coli it was tested with. It was also shown to have anti-microbial properties that were found to fight mold, yeast, and bacteria.

Anticancer: Clinical studies published in Nutrition and Cancer also show that basil contains phytochemicals, which can help naturally prevent cancer, including chemical-induced skin, liver, oral and lung cancers. Basil is able to increase antioxidant activity, positively alter gene expressions, induce cancerous-cell apoptosis (death of harmful cells) and stop cancerous tumors from spreading.

Antioxidant & Anti-Inflammatory: as an antioxidant and help the body get rid of free radicals. Sweet basil is an excellent source of antioxidants such as phenolic compounds and polyphenols. Research published in 2012 showed that these antioxidants make basil a great choice for helping with inflammatory diseases. Because oxidative stress and inflammation are often present with serious illnesses like diabetes and heart disease, this research is promising for combating the increase in these health problems.

Antimicrobial: against a wide range of bacteria, yeasts, molds and viruses. This means you can add protection against the candida virus and various forms of skin irritations to the long list of proven benefits of basil.

Herbal Remedies with Basil

Calming the Stomach: One-half teaspoon of dried or fresh basil leaf in water can often help soothe indigestion and alleviate feelings of fullness.

Coughing and Colds: chew fresh leaves to calm coughing or make a calming tea of dried basil to help soothe illness.

Facial Steam for Headache: A facial steam with dried basil leaf can help alleviate a headache. Add a tablespoon of dried basil leaf to 2 cups of boiling water in a large pot. Carefully lean over the pot, cover head with a towel and breathe in the steam for 5-10 minutes until headache starts to subside.

Stings and Bites: If you are working outside and get bitten or stung by an insect and don’t have any plantain growing nearby, chewing up a basil leaf and applying to the bite will help relieve the pain and draw out the venom.

Blood Sugar: There is some evidence that basil can help level out blood sugar if consumed regularly and drank as a juice or tea.

Stress Reduction: One herbalist suggests adding 2 cups of strong basil leaf tea to a warm bath to help reduce stress and facilitate relaxation.

Basil Essential Oil Benefits

Basil Linalool Essential Oil is one of the finest oils available for calming and focusing the mind, and is also useful for easing tension in the head and neck. It is preferred as a mind-clearing oil for spiritual meditation. Due to the high linalool content (which makes this oil very relaxing) you can also use basil to help ease the transition into bedtime. Basil also can help uplift your mood.

Cardiovascular Health: can help the muscles that control blood vessel function to contract and relax, promoting healthy blood pressure. Benefits of basil include the ability to help prevent dangerous platelet aggregation, clumping together of blood platelets that can form a clot within the arteries and cause cardiac arrest.

Cold & Flu: add one to two drops to a steam bath, or make a homemade vapor rub using eucalyptus oil and basil oil that can massaged into the chest to open up your nasal passages.

Detoxification: sickly rats were given basil extract over a period of five days, they experienced significant improvements in producing detoxifying enzymes, higher antioxidant defenses and a reduction of fat buildup in the liver that can cause liver disease.

Fights Depression: Benefits of basil also apply to those with mental disorders or mood-related illnesses, including depression and anxiety. Basil is also considered an antidepressant by some since it can positively impact brain function within the adrenal cortex, helping stimulate neurotransmitters that regulate the hormones responsible for making us happy and energetic.

Insect Repellent: research has shown that the volatile oils found in basil can repel mosquitoes and help to prevent bug bites. To make a homemade bug spray or lotion, dilute several drops of basil essential oils with carrier oil and massage into skin or swollen bites as needed.

Mood Enhancer: Inhaling basil can help restore mental alertness and fight fatigue since it’s naturally a stimulant that works on the nervous system and adrenal cortex. Many people find it beneficial for reducing symptoms like sluggishness, brain fog and poor moods that accompany adrenal fatigue or chronic fatigue. Diffuse basil essential oil throughout your home or inhale it directly from the bottle. You can also combine a couple drops of basil oil with a carrier oil like jojoba and put it on your wrists for an instant pick-me-up.

Muscle Relaxant: you can rub a few drops of basil essential oil along with coconut oil into painful, swollen muscles or joints. To further help relax tense areas and feel immediate relief, try soaking in a warm bath with Epsom salts and a couple drops of lavender oil and basil oil.

Stress Relief: Basil oil is known to be uplifting and renewing, which makes it useful for lowering symptoms of anxiety, fear or nervousness. Used for aromatherapy for centuries to help people deal with racing thoughts and overwhelming feelings, you can burn basil oil at home to relax and unwind. This can also work quickly for natural headache relief. Massage one or two drops with a carrier oil into your feet or over your adrenals nightly to reduce stress.

Basil Safety & Precautions

While basil is generally considered a safe herb in culinary amounts, medicinal use of basil is considered “possibly unsafe” for children and women who are pregnant or breastfeeding. Keep in mind also that basil essential oil (or any essential oil) is very concentrated and merits special precautions. Because basil could reduce blood pressure, in theory, it could cause low blood pressure. Consult your healthcare professional before taking basil (or any herb) medicinally.

References:

  1. https://wellnessmama.com/5505/basil-leaf/
  2. https://www.planttherapy.com/basil-linalool-essential-oil?v=537
  3. https://draxe.com/nutrition/herbs/benefits-of-basil/
  4. https://www.aromaweb.com/essential-oils/basil-oil.asp
  5. https://draxe.com/essential-oils/basil-essential-oil/
  6. https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/basil-essential-oil.html

Arnica Montana

Arnica Montana Flower – By Buendia22 – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=72759312

Want to try an all-natural herbal infusion of Arnica? Find it here.

Arnica montana, also known as wolf’s bane, leopard’s bane, mountain tobacco and mountain arnica, is a moderately toxic European flowering plant in the sunflower family. Arnica grows mainly in Siberia and central Europe, as well as temperate climates in North America. Arnica is an alpine plant, grow­ing in nutrient-poor soil. It can potentially reach a height of up to 60cm, but this is unusual given the harsh conditions at high altitudes. It grows in meadows up to 3,000 metres above sea level, where it is exposed to strong sunlight. The higher the altitude, the more aro­matic the plant will become.

The plants are rich in inulin, a com­pound between sugar and starch that the plants store in their underground organs as a source of energy. It is used as a natural sweetener for diabetics. The Compositae contain selenium and arnica ash is rich in manganese. Both selenium and manganese are powerful antioxidants in the human body and in addition manganese is an essential element needed for healthy bones, wound healing, and the metabolism of proteins, cholesterol and carbohydrates. It may well be that it is this rich source of manganese that facilitates healing, acting in combination with the other plant chemicals. Manganese levels affect the levels of iron, magnesium and calcium in the body.

Generations of Swiss mountain guides chewed arnica leaves to prevent fatigue induced by climbing. The dried leaves were used as a substitute for tobacco, hence its common name of mountain tobacco. The dried flowers promote sneezing, so it was also known as snuff plant. Fall kraut, fall herb and wound herb, other eponyms, demonstrate the age-old use for the effects of trauma.

The flowers are used as a compress for sprains and bruises. Herbally, the plant has been used for traumatic injuries involving bruising, and as a cardiac tonic for weak and weary hearts. It is also used homeopathically to reduce emotional and physical trauma, support the heart, and for weakness and weariness in the elderly.

Arnica is also used to stimulate the kidneys but can be quite toxic in herbal solutions. The ingestion of large quantities can cause irritation to the gut; a temporary stimulation is followed by a depression of the circulation, respiration and temperature. Violent headaches ensue, the pupils dilate and then muscular paralysis sets in. The whole nervous system is paralyzed and death results. Arnica should be used judiciously on the skin as it can cause nasty irritating rashes.

Mother Jai’s creates all-natural Arnica Oil in small batches in Arvada, Colorado. The herbal infusion is safe to use on the skin and works wonders on injuries and pain. When combined with St John’s Wort oil the benefits are doubled. Find it here.

Resources:

  1. britishhomeopathic.org/charity/how-we-can-help/articles/homeopathic-medicines/a/arnica-montana/
  2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arnica_montana
  3. https://www.mskcc.org/cancer-care/integrative-medicine/herbs/arnica
  4. https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-721/arnica