Jasmine Oil

Jasmine Absolute & Essential Oil (Jasminum grandiflorum, officinale, and sambac)

Jasmine is known as the King of Oils, Rose is the Queen. This is because of its masculine floral scent that it possesses. It has been known as the King of Oils since ancient times. This highly concentrated oil has many health benefits that may prove beneficial for your life.

You will find Jasmine Absolute in Mother Jai’s Aroma Sprays & Bath Oils.

Origins of Jasmine

Jasmine, also known as the “Queen of the Night” or “King of Oils” is a highly intoxicating plant. Its strong, heavy yet sweet scent has been used for years to invoke love and happiness.

Jasmine belongs to the Oleaceae family. The jasmine plant can grow upwards of 10-15 feet in height or 3-5 meters. The plant has dark green leaves with white flowers. These flowers are what are harvested to be used in the making of the jasmine essential oil. There are over 200 species of jasmine that can get made into essential oil, however, commonly used jasmine for essential oil purposes is common jasmine or Jasminum Officinale Though Spanish or Royal jasmine, Jasminum Grandiflorum , is sometimes also used.

Jasmine grows in the summer and into the fall and the flowers bloom overnight. Because the flowers bloom at night this is when they are harvested to produce the essential oil. Fun fact: it takes nearly 8000 carefully picked jasmine blossoms to produce about 1 gram or 1 mL of Jasmine Absolute essential oil. The flowers have a powerful scent that explodes into the air as they bloom at night. The scent may be strong but it is also sweet in nature and pleasing to the senses. The extracted essential oil is thick in consistency and is a light reddish brown in color.

Jasmine essential oil is extracted from the flowers of jasmine, and it has various scientific names including Jasminum grandiflorum (Royal jasmine) and Jasminum officinale (Common jasmine). The oil is extracted mainly from the latter variety.

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Its main components are benzoic acid, benzaldehyde, benzyl acetate, benzyl alcohol, indole, benzyl benzoate, cis-3-hexenyl benzoate, cis-jasmone, ceosol, eugenol, farnesol, geraniol, linalool, methyl anthranilate, p-cresol, nerol, gamma terpineol, nerolidol, isophytol, and phytol.

Blending: Essential oil of jasmine blends well with the essential oils of bergamot, sandalwood, rose, and citrus fruits such as oranges, lemons, limes, and grapefruits.

  • Planet – Mercury, The Moon
  • Element – Earth, Water
  • Quality – Feminine
  • Zodiac – Cancer, Capricorn, Pisces
  • Chakra – Heart

Health Benefits of Jasmine Essential Oil (OrganicFacts.net)

The health benefits of jasmine essential oil can be attributed to its properties as an antidepressant, antiseptic, aphrodisiac, antispasmodic, cicatrizant, expectorant, galactagogue, emmenagogue, parturient, sedative, and a uterine substance.

Relieves Depression: The aroma of jasmine essential oil has a pleasing and uplifting effect on the mind and it actively fights depression. This makes a person feel happy and potentially awakens romantic and poetic feelings, just as it has done in literary and musical history! The aromatic effect of jasmine oil stimulates the release of certain hormones in the body, including serotonin, which results in the boost of energy and the uplifted mood. A study published in Natural Product Communications found that jasmine oil used on the skin over an eight-week period helped participants feel an improvement in their moods and a decrease in both physical and emotional signs of low energy.

Prevents Infections: It is also a very good antiseptic and disinfectant. Its constituents like benzaldehyde, benzoic acid, and benzyl benzoate have very effective germicidal, bactericidal, fungicidal, and antiviral properties. When externally applied to wounds, it prevents them from becoming septic and effectively eliminates potential infections from tetanus. It can also have internal applications, and when inhaled, it is known to reduce infections in the respiratory system and can relieve colds and coughs.

Inhaling jasmine oil, either directly or by infusing it in your home, can help clear mucus and bacteria within the nasal passages and respiratory symptom. Applying it to your skin can also reduce inflammation, redness, pain and speed up time needed to heal wounds.

Mix 5 to 10 drops of jasmine essential oil into your favorite hand lotion and use it as a hand sanitizer. You can make the mixture stronger, or even use it straight from the bottle, too. Run a diffuser with 2 to 3 drops of jasmine oil to kill viruses in the air and fill the room with its wonderful fragrance.

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Fight Fungal Infections: Apply jasmine essential oil to sites of fungal infections for quick healing. This oil often doesn’t need to be diluted with a carrier oil. Just put a few drops on your fingers and massage it into the affected area. The fungal infection should clear up within 2 weeks. Be sure to wash your clothes thoroughly to kill the fungal spores there, too. Put 5 to 10 drops of jasmine EO into your laundry along with your favorite detergent or make your own.

Mix 5 to 6 drops in 1 cup of warm water, put the mixture into a spray bottle and thoroughly spray your sneakers if you are fighting athlete’s foot. After the fungal infection clears up, mix a few drops of jasmine EO into your favorite lotion and use it as a moisturizer to keep the fungus from coming back.

Stimulates Sexual Desires: It is actually the aphrodisiac property of jasmine essential oil that makes you feel romantic or in love. This oil enhances your libido and feelings of sexual desire. Due to the aroma, the use of jasmine flowers in bridal accessories and room décor of the newlywed, especially in the Indian Subcontinent is often seen. It also helps cure problems such as premature ejaculation, frigidity, impotence, and other sexual disorders.

Compared with a placebo, jasmine oil caused significant increases of physical signs of arousal — such as breathing rate, body temperature, blood oxygen saturation, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure — in a study done on healthy adult women. Subjects in the jasmine oil group also rated themselves as more alert and more vigorous than subjects in the control group. The study results indicate that jasmine oil can increase autonomic arousal activity and help elevate mood at the same time.

Fades Scar Marks: Are you worried about the scar marks and after spots left by boils, acne, or other wounds? You should definitely try jasmine essential oil. Since it is a cicatrizant, it can help fade those scar marks and after spots. It can also help eliminate the fat cracks that often happen in pregnant mothers.

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Reduces Cough: The expectorant property of Jasmine Essential Oil can help you have an undisturbed night of sleep, even when you are suffering from a cough or cold. It provides relief from a cough by helping clear out the accumulation of phlegm in the respiratory tracts. It also eliminates snoring by clearing the congestion from nasal and respiratory tracts. With jasmine essential oil working in your system, you will be kept away from coughing and snoring endlessly through the night.

Treats Insomnia: The properties of jasmine essential oil make it an ideal tool for inducing long, restful, and undisturbed sleep. Its behavior as an expectorant, sedative, and antispasmodic combine to help you indulge in a peaceful good night’s sleep. By reducing signs of insomnia and sleeplessness, you can get more productive at work and in your personal life.

A 2005 study published in the European Journal of Applied Physiology found that jasmine tea odor had sedative effects on both autonomic nerve activity and mood states. Inhaling jasmine along with lavender helped reduce heart rate and bring on feelings of calm and relaxation, which are all important for dosing off and avoiding restless nights.

Emmenagogue: This property is meant to give relief to those women who suffer from irregular, obstructed, or painful menses or an untimely menopause. The emmenagogue property of jasmine oil regulates period cycles, and makes the periods clear and less painful, while also helping to push back menopause. It also provides relief from other problems associated with menses such as fatigue, annoyance, nausea, and mood swings. Regulating your period is also a great way to balance the hormonal levels of your body. It also helps to keep other bodily functions working in a systematic manner, keeping you healthy and fit.

In a study published in the Journal of Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, when menopausal women applied jasmine oil to their skin over an eight-week period, they showed improvements in energy levels, mood and menopause-related symptoms, including hot flashes, pain and depression, compared to women who weren’t using jasmine oil.

Use jasmine essential oil to balance your hormone levels during menopause and get relief from menopausal symptoms. Practice aromatherapy several times a day or put a few drops into a carrier oil or lotion and massage it into your abdomen and back. Actually, you can apply it as an all-over body lotion, if you like. There is a lovely blend for this that includes 1 drop each of jasmine and angelica, 2 drops clary sage, 5 drops geranium and 6 drops lemon essential oil.

Skin Care: Jasmine oil has long been associated with skin care, particularly in terms of treating dry, brittle, or dehydrated skin. However, since it does have certain non-sensitizing effects, it is not always pleasant to use on cracked or open wounds on the skin, as it can cause an allergic reaction, or irritation. That being said, it is still frequently used for the treatment of eczema and dermatitis.

Gently apply jasmine essential oil to bruises to speed healing. You can apply it several times a day.

Mix 2 to 3 drops of jasmine essential oil into 1 teaspoon of a light carrier oil and use this blend to moisturize acne-prone skin. You can also add jasmine oil to your favorite facial cleanser. For individual pimples, put a drop of jasmine oil on your fingertip or a cotton swab and apply it directly on the pimple. Jasmine’s antibacterial, antiseptic and anti-inflammatory properties will clear it up quickly.

Massage jasmine oil into scars and stretchmarks. You will be amazed at how quickly they fade. You can use it straight or mix it into a carrier oil like argan, jojoba, sweet almond or coconut.

Use jasmine oil to clear up eczema and dermatitis. Its anti-inflammatory and antiseptic properties will give quick relief from these uncomfortable skin conditions.

Facilitates Lactation: Jasmine essential oil increases milk secretion from the breasts and is therefore very good for lactating mothers and their new babies. This property also helps protect from breast tumor and cancer.

Promotes & Eases Childbirth: The essential oil of jasmine facilitates and eases parturition and reduces labor pains. This feature can be very beneficial in today’s situations when a normal delivery is a rare sight and most of the cases are handled with caesarean sections. For many women who choose to use jasmine essential oil, they find that the recovery process is less painful and the post-natal period is also shorter. Furthermore, it can strengthen contractions and shorten the time it takes to deliver a baby. At that point, many women suffer from post-partum depression, but jasmine essential oil also combats that tragic condition due to its antidepressant and uplifting qualities.

Practice jasmine essential oil aromatherapy for 30 to 60 minutes several times a day to help get your hormones regulated after having a baby. It will relieve anxiety, boost your energy levels and lift your spirits. Apply the PMS blend to sore abdominal and back muscles for quick relief. You can also fade stretch marks. If you are breastfeeding, wait until after the baby is weaned before you begin using jasmine oil.

Treats Spasms: Jasmine essential oil is very good for treating and relaxing spasms. It provides quick relief from spasmodic coughs, cramps, congestion, asthma, breathlessness, and even spasmodic cholera. It also alleviates intestinal cramps and pains resulting from spasms in other parts of the body. Spasms can be dangerous, disruptive, and even deadly, so any substance that can alleviate this serious condition quickly should be respected.

Soothe Sore Muscles: Massage jasmine essential oil into sore muscles for quick relief. It will quickly reduce the pain and inflammation. Mix 1 tablespoon of coconut oil with 5 or 6 drops of argan oil then add 3 to 5 drops of jasmine oil. The coconut oil has a great consistency for massage and the argan oil speeds up absorption.

Sedative Effect: Jasmine essential oil calms down the body, mind, and soul while bringing forth positive and constructive emotions. It gives relief from anxiety, stress, annoyance, anger, and depression as well as from inflammations of all sorts. Although further research is yet to be conducted, these sedative and anti-inflammatory properties are also associated with pain and discomfort of arthritis and gout.

Cognitive Ability Aide: Jasmine is a natural energy booster. Simply inhaling jasmine in the morning will help to awaken the senses allowing you to be more aware and alert for the upcoming day. It also helps to increase body temperature and heart rate along with the brain’s activity to help increase productivity and learning.

Protects the Uterus: This oil is good for uterine health because it tones the uterus and promotes the secretion of certain hormones which ensure good health and proper functioning of the organ. It also helps protect the uterus from tumors, particularly after menopause, by restricting the flow of estrogen.

Other Benefits: It can also be used to free people from narcotics and other addictions.

Word of Caution: Pregnant women should avoid using this oil until parturition since it is an emmenagogue. It is highly relaxing and sedating and thus heavy doses should be avoided. Again, those who are allergic to jasmine should avoid using it, as with any essential oil made from a known allergen.

How Does Jasmine Absolute Oil Work?

Jasmine absolute oil works in different ways, depending on how you need it. It can be inhaled, diffused or can be simply applied externally. The following are some ways to use your jasmine absolute oil:

  • Through a diffuser. Just add some drops of the essential to your diffuser to provide a relaxing and refreshing fragrance to your home.
  • External application. Apply a few drops of the oil on your neck or forehead to calm and clear your mind, or to feel a surge of hope and happiness. Applying it topically can also treat skin disorders and muscle spasms.
  • Inhalation. Jasmine absolute oil also aids coughs and relieves nervousness and stress when inhaled.

What to Look for When Purchasing Your Jasmine Absolute

What to look for when it comes to purchasing your jasmine essential oil. Well there are a few things that you should look for and note when you are looking for a company or manufacturer.

First you will want to ensure that you are purchasing your essential oil from a reputable company and/or manufacturer. You will want to ensure that this company or manufacturer harvests the jasmine flowers at the correct time, using the correct harvesting methods.

You will also want to ensure that they extract the jasmine essential oil through the process of solvent or enfleurage extraction. You will want to check the ingredients of the jasmine essential oil bottle to ensure you are purchasing true or absolute essential oil and not a carrier oil with jasmine added to it.

Note that the essential oil that is produced year to year can vary because of the environment. This is normal but is something to consider as prices could change to reflect how plentiful or devastating the harvest was that specific year. Temperature, humidity, moisture and other environmental elements can all play a factor in the production and harvest of the jasmine blossoms.

How to Make Jasmine Oil at Home

Jasmine essential oil is not an easy essential oil to produce. Since the jasmine flowers are fragile it makes for a careful harvest and extraction process. The flowers have been known to bruise easily upon harvest which can lead to an unpleasant fragrance when the oil is produced.

In order to produce the highest quality of essential oil, jasmine should be harvested at night when it is full bloom. This will ensure that the chemical makeup inside of the jasmine flowers is at their prime for extraction.

Jasmine essential oil is typically extracted through the process of solvent extraction or enfleurage extraction. Both of these processes soak the jasmine flowers to help extract the essential oil from the flowers.

Enfleurage extraction is done by soaking the jasmine flowers in odorless plant oil or animal fats. Alcohol is then added to the mixture to pull the essential oil from the fat. Then the fat is separated from the mixture and the alcohol is allowed to evaporate to leave the end result of the jasmine absolute.

Solvent extraction is like that of the above enfleurage extraction however water and organic solvents are used to extract the oil from the jasmine flowers. The water and the solvent are then separated and removed from the mixture leaving behind the jasmine essential oil.

It should be noted that the chemicals that are sometimes used in the solvent extraction process can change the chemical makeup of the jasmine essential oil. Do your research on how the extraction is done and what is used in the extraction process.

Both processes can be time consuming and difficult to perform, especially if you do not have the right equipment. That is not to say that it cannot be done, but just note the pros and cons of each process prior to trying it on your own.

Recipes

Homemade Jasmine Oil Perfume

Ingredients:

  • 30 drops jasmine oil
  • 5 drops vanilla essential oil
  • 5 drops lavender essential oil
  • 5 drops orange essential oil
  • 2 tablespoons everclear
  • 1 tablespoon orange blossom water (or distilled water)

Directions:

  • Mix the essential oil blend with the everclear in a glass mason jar or bottle and leave it to sit on a counter top for two days. Keep it covered and somewhere that’s room temperature and away from the sun.
  • Add the orange blossom water or distilled water and stir together. Add the mixture to an old perfume spray bottle or regular aluminum spray bottle. Keep the mix somewhere around room temperature, and use on your skin, clothes, sheets, rugs, etc.

That Time of the Month Massage Blend

Ingredients:

  • 2 drops jasmine essential oil
  • 4 drops marjoram essential oil
  • 10 mL carrier oil of your choice (argan, coconut, sesame, sweet almond, jojoba, grapeseed, macadamia)

Instructions:

  • In a 10 ml roller bottle combine all of the above ingredients together.
  • Mix well.
  • Massage onto the stomach and/or lower back as needed.
SKU 83556

Foaming Face Wash Blend

Ingredients:

  • 8 oz. mild unscented castile soap
  • 8 oz. distilled water
  • 1 Tbsp. sweet almond oil
  • 20 drops jasmine essential oil
  • 10 drops geranium essential oil

Instructions:

  • In a foaming soap dispenser combine all of the above ingredients together.
  • Mix well.
  • Pump one pump into the palm of your hands and massage into face. Rinse
  • Use twice daily as needed.

Bring the Romance Diffuser Blend

Ingredients:

  • 1 drop jasmine essential oil
  • 1 drop patchouli essential oil
  • 1 drop orange essential oil

Instructions:

  • Combine all of the above ingredients together in a diffuser.
  • Diffuse throughout the air to induce feelings of romance and sexual desire.

Jasmine Coconut Sugar Scrub

Ingredients:

  • 10 drops jasmine essential oil
  • ½ cup coconut oil
  • 1 cup sugar

Instructions:

  • Melt the ½ cup of coconut oil in the microwave or over the stove. Make sure it is completely melted.
  • Transfer the melted coconut oil to a bowl and add in the sugar.
  • Mix well.
  • Mix in the jasmine essential oil. Be sure it is well combined into the mixture.
  • Transfer the mixture to a Mason jar and seal.
  • Use as needed in the shower. Apply to the body, massaging it in and then rinse off.

Jasmine Bath Salts

Ingredients:

  • 15-20 drops jasmine EO
  • 3 cups Epsom salts

Instructions:

  • In a glass jar combine the above ingredients together.
  • Mix well.
  • In a warm bath add ¼ – ½ cup of the mixture. Lay back and enjoy!

Here are a few other ideas for using jasmine essential oil:

  • Try adding a few drops of the essential oil to a diffuser to diffuse throughout the room to help reduce depression and stress or to help promote rest and relaxation.
  • Try mixing a few drops of jasmine essential oil with a carrier oil and applying it to sore muscles or wounds on the skin. Also try applying this to the temples or neck to help reduce the feeling of stress and depression.
  • Add a few drops of jasmine to a bath and allow it to help soothe and relax you.
  • Try a jasmine essential oil inhaler for on the go relief.
  • Massage some jasmine onto your stomach to help relieve symptoms of PMS and menopause.
  • Mix a couple drops of jasmine essential oil with your face lotion and massage onto and into the face to help reduce fine lines and wrinkles.
  • Try some jasmine tea to help promote healing, rest and relaxation.

References:

  1. https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/essential-oils/health-benefits-of-jasmine-essential-oil.html
  2. https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/beverage/health-benefits-of-jasmine-tea.html
  3. https://draxe.com/jasmine-oil/
  4. https://www.gurunanda.com/blogs/essential-oils/jasmine-essential-oil-benefits-and-uses
  5. https://organicdailypost.com/21-remarkable-uses-jasmine-essential-oil/
  6. https://articles.mercola.com/herbal-oils/jasmine-absolute-oil.aspx
  7. https://essentialoilsanctuary.com/15-jasmine-essential-oil-benefits-uses-plus-recipes-application-tips/
  8. https://www.sagegoddess.com/product/jasmine-essential-oil/
  9. https://essentialoils.co.za/essential-oils/jasmine.htm
  10. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20046722
  11. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20184043
  12. https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnagi.2017.00168/full
  13. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20184043
  14. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15976995
  15. https://www.wjgnet.com/2218-6190/full/v6/i2/27.htm
  16. https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/Antibacterial-Potential-Assessment-of-Jasmine-Oil-Rath-Devi/4e6a859a3535bdb4f788fe9dbf5ea06b4e26a779
  17. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2529395/
  18. http://www.researchgate.net/publication/236235613_THE_EFFECTS_OF_JASMINE_OIL_INHALATION_ON_BRAIN_WAVE_ACTIVIES_AND_EMOTIONS
  19. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?cmd=search&term=19580857
  20. https://opus.govst.edu/research_day/2017/Presentations/7/
  21. https://www.originalbotanica.com/blog/the-spiritual-and-magical-properties-of-jasmine/
  22. https://www.groveandgrotto.com/blogs/articles/magickal-uses-of-jasmine

Goat’s Rue

Goat’s Rue root (Galega officinalis)

Galega officinalis, commonly known as galega, goat’s-rue, French lilac, Italian fitch, or professor-weed, is an herbaceous plant in the Faboideae subfamily. It is native to the Middle East but has been naturalized in Europe and western Asia. The plant has been extensively cultivated as a forage crop, an ornamental, a bee plant, and as green manure.

OTHER NAMES: Faux-Indigo, French Honeysuckle, French Lilac, Galega, Galéga, Galéga Officinal, Galega bicolor, Galega officinalis, Galega patula, Galegae Officinalis Herba, Geissrautenkraut, Goat’s Rue Herb, Italian Fitch, Lavanegravese, Lilas d’Espagne, Lilas Français, Rue-de-Chegravevre, Rue des Chegravevres, Sainfoin d’Espagne.

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By Epibase – Own work, CC BY 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=5396096

Chemical Composition

Although not thoroughly studied with 21st century methods, G. officinalis has been analyzed for its constituents, which include galegine, hydroxygalegine, several guanidine derivatives, such as 4-hydroxygalegine flavones, flavone glycosides, kaempferol, and quercetin. In addition to its purported effect to lower blood glucose levels and induce diuresis, goat’s rue was used as an herbal tonic in folk medicine practices of medieval Europe to treat bubonic plague, worms, and snake bites.

History

Goat’s rue is originally from the Middle East, but nowadays it grows all over Europe and Asia. This useful and diverse herb has been eagerly spread by humans, who have cultivated it as a fodder, green manure, honey plant, medicinal and ornamental. It was believed to increase the milk yield of domesticated animals, which is the origin of its scientific name: gale, ‘milk’ and ega ‘to bring, cause’ – so it is the milk-bringer. Since the Middle Ages goat’s rue has been used to treat diabetes as the guanidine it contains lowers blood sugar levels. Species have also been used in fishing: crushed stems are simply thrown into the water and the fish rendered unconscious by the poison are collected from the surface. In North America there has been a fear that goat’s rue will cross-breed and become a problematic alien, in much the same way that we in Finland have the same fears about garden lupine (Lupinus polyphyllos). Goat’s rue can mainly be found in Finland as a garden ornamental and only occasionally does it spread to the wild.

CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=64087

Benefits of Galega

Goat’s rue has been employed as a vermifuge, to treat snakebites, and to aid in treating the plague. It was believed to have been used as a diuretic and tonic in typhoid conditions and also as a nervous system stimulant.

Culpepper suggested goat’s rue as a soak for tired feet and for cheese making. Hill’s Universal Herbal (1832) mentions the dried flowers of goat’s rue being added to boiling water as an infusion and then taken to induce sweating and aid in fevers. The plant is widely cultivated as cattle feed.

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Goat’s rue is used along with conventional treatment for diabetes and as a diuretic. In combination with other herbs, it is used to stimulate the adrenal gland and pancreas; to protect the liver; for digestion problems; and to start the flow of breast milk. Some people use herbal combinations that include goat’s rue as a tonic and for “blood purification.”

Galactagogue: increases milk supply in mammals. Developing mammary tissue. Goat’s Rue stimulates the development of mammary tissue. It has even been used to increase breast size in non-lactating woman. It can even induce the growth of breast tissue in women who have had breast surgery, or plan on nursing an adopted child. Promote tissue growth in women whose breasts didn’t increase during pregnancy. Promotes rapid natural breast milk production as Goat’s Rue has galactagogue properties (promote milk flow). Facilitates breast let down, so that your body can release the milk. Helps to maintain breast health during nursing and lactation.

Antidiabetic: Lowers insulin and blood sugar levels, insulin-sensitizing. It has been used in diabetic patients to lower their blood sugar levels since the early 1900’s.

Diuretic: it promotes the production of urine.

Antibacterial: bactericidal properties.

Diaphoretic: inducing perspiration.

Anti-obesity. Protects the liver. Blood purification. Digestive problems.

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Vermifuge: destroy or expel intestinal worms.

Dosing

The appropriate dose of goat’s rue depends on several factors such as the user’s age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for goat’s rue. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

Goats Rue can be taken in a tablet form or as a tea. It is said that the fresh plant may be toxic, thus use only the dried form of the plant.

Goats Rue Tea. To make Goat’s Rue tea, use 1 teaspoon dried leaves in 1 cup of water. Let it sit for 10 minutes. Dosage: You can drink one cup of Goat Rue tea up to three times a day. Add other herbs such as alfalfa, fennel or fenugreek to your tea to further support milk production.

Goats Rue Capsules. The normal dose for Goat’s Rue capsules is 1 capsule 3 or 4 times per day. Goats Rue Capsules are available online (Amazon.com). Make sure to purchase your capsules from a trustworthy company. Most capsules come with directions and dosing on them, so follow instructions or consult your healthcare professional in case of doubt. Goats Rue is also found in some readymade teas and capsules made specifically for breastfeeding mothers.

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Goats Rue Tincture. A tincture is a very strong herbal extract. It’s mostly made with alcohol, food grade glycerin, apple cider vinegar or honey. It’s said that making it with alcohol is the best option, as the ethanol in the alcohol helps to release the properties of the herb. Not to worry though, the amount of alcohol you will be getting in is not harmful to you or your baby. Dosage: Take half a teaspoon (20 to 40 drops) of Goat’s Rue tincture 2 to 3 times a day. It can be taken in water, juice or directly under your tongue.

By Buendia22 – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=72027189

Relation to Metformin

G. officinalis is rich in guanidine, a substance with blood glucose-lowering activity at the foundation for discovering metformin, a treatment for managing symptoms of diabetes mellitus. In ancient herbalism, goat’s-rue was used as a diuretic. It can be poisonous to mammals but is a food for various insects.

Once used in traditional medicine over centuries, G. officinalis is at the foundation of the biguanide class of antidiabetic drugs, which also included phenformin and buformin (both discontinued).

G. officinalis contains the phytochemicals, galegine and guanidine, both of which decrease blood sugar, but were discovered to cause adverse effects in human studies. The study of galegine and related molecules in the first half of the 20th century led to development of oral antidiabetic drugs. Research on other compounds related to guanidine, including biguanide, led ultimately to the discovery of metformin (trade name, Glucophage), used in the 21st century for management of diabetes by decreasing liver glucose production and increasing insulin sensitivity of body tissues.

Side Effects & Precautions

Do not use the fresh Goat’s Rue plant as it is considered toxic. Always use dried materials when preparing tinctures or teas.

There isn’t enough information to know whether goat’s rue is safe. No harmful effects have been reported in humans, but fatal poisoning has occurred in grazing animals that ate large quantities of goat’s rue.

Goat’s-rue may interfere with prescribed diabetes drugs, iron absorption, and anticoagulants. It may cause headache or muscular weakness, and its safety during pregnancy or breastfeeding is unknown.

Allergies: If you are allergic to peanuts, soybean, alfalfa or fenugreek allergic reactions may occur as Goat’s Rue is a member of the same family of plants.

Bleeding conditions: Goat’s rue might slow blood clotting and increase the risk of bleeding. In theory, goat’s rue might make bleeding disorders worse.

Diabetes: Goat’s rue might lower blood sugar levels in some people. Watch for signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and monitor your blood sugar carefully if you have diabetes and use goat’s rue.

Surgery: Goat’s rue might affect blood sugar levels. There is concern that it might interfere with blood sugar control during and after surgery. Stop using goat’s rue at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs) interacts with GOAT’S RUE

Goat’s rue might decrease blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking goat’s rue along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.<br /> Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.

Recipes

Goats Rue Tincture. Goats Rue tincture can be used to increase milk supply and make your milk richer and creamier as well as more nutritious.

Ingredients: Goat’s Rue, Red Raspberry leaf, Blessed Thistle, Fenugreek, Marshmallow Root, Fennel, Vodka or Everclear.

Method: Put half a cup of each of the herbs in a glass jar. Add only ¼ cup fennel and a small amount of water (enough to wet the herbs). Add vodka. 50% herb 50% alcohol ratio. Shake well and store in a cool, dry place for 2 to 6 weeks. Make sure to shake the mixture every few days.

The Goat’s Rue Tincture can be used from week 2, but the longer it sits, the more concentrated the tincture will get, as the vodka needs to let the herb release all its valuable properties.

When you want to use the tincture, separate or strain the herbs from the liquid and pour into dropper bottles.

Dosage: Take half a teaspoon (20 to 40 drops) of Goat’s Rue tincture 2 to 3 times a day. It can be taken in water, juice or directly under your tongue.

References:

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galega_officinalis
  2. https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-160/goats-rue
  3. https://www.drugs.com/npp/goat-s-rue.html
  4. https://www.breastfeeding-problems.com/goats-rue-and-breastfeeding.html
  5. https://doi.org/10.1172%2FJCI14178
  6. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2606813
  7. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pdi.606/full
  8. http://www.invasive.org/eastern/other/Galega.html
  9. https://www.nps.org.au/australian-prescriber/articles/metformin-myths-misunderstandings-and-lessons-from-history
  10. https://npgsweb.ars-grin.gov/gringlobal/taxonomydetail.aspx?id=70971
  11. https://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/r/ruegoa21.html
  12. https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/galega-officinalis
  13. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-642-74448-8_16
  14. http://www.luontoportti.com/suomi/en/kukkakasvit/goat-s-rue
  15. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/222239853_Anti-bacterial_activity_of_Galega_officinalis_L_Goat’s_Rue
  16. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/00288233.2004.9513591
  17. https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/13909257/[Isolation_of_peganine_from_goat’s_rue_Galega_officinalis_L]_
  18. https://www.reddit.com/r/Herblore/comments/36629j/goats_rue_galega_officinalis_medicinal/
  19. http://jb.asm.org/content/171/10/5561.full.pdf
  20. https://www.jstor.org/stable/42952629?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents
  21. https://nzpps.org/nzpp_abstract.php?paper=651920
  22. https://www.womenfitness.net/herbal-management-diabetes/
  23. https://graz.pure.elsevier.com/en/publications/alleviation-of-salt-stress-of-symbiotic-galega-officinalis-l-goat
  24. https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/Alleviation-of-salt-stress-of-symbiotic-Galega-L.-Egamberdieva-Berg/9d15a5320da81b4d919d303c7f1d4c82f25d53a4