Arrowroot

You will find arrowroot powder in Mother Jai’s Toothpowder and Mudd Mask.

Arrowroot is a starch obtained from the rhizomes (rootstock) of several tropical plants, traditionally Maranta arundinacea, but also Florida arrowroot from Zamia integrifolia, and tapioca from cassava (Manihot esculenta), which is often labelled as arrowroot. Polynesian arrowroot or pia (Tacca leontopetaloides), and Japanese arrowroot (Pueraria lobata), also called kudzu, are used in similar ways.

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Arrowroot Health Benefits

  • Arrowroot is used as a nutritional food for infants and for people recovering from illness.
  • It is also used for stomach and intestinal disorders, including diarrhea. Full of undigestible fiber that feeds good bacteria and soothes mucous membranes.
  • Dietary fiber can help to clear out excess cholesterol, further promoting cardiovascular health.
  • Some people sooth painful gums and sore mouth by applying arrowroot directly to the affected area.
  • Babies cut teeth on arrowroot cookies. The anti-inflammatory effects sooth irritated gums.
  • Intestinal problem (irritable bowel syndrome, IBS). Early research suggests that taking powdered arrowroot three times per day with meals for one month reduces stomach pain and diarrhea in people with IBS.
  • The significant levels of potassium found in arrowroot mean that it can be a definite line of defense against heart-related issues. Potassium is a vasodilator, meaning that it relaxes the tension in the blood vessels and arteries, thereby lowering blood pressure and reducing your risk of atherosclerosis, heart attacks, and strokes.
  • It fights various foodborne pathogens such as salmonella virus, preparing the body’s defense system against various diseases and disorders. Researchers have demonstrated the antibacterial effect of the use of arrowroot tea extracts on soups.
  • One particular member of the B family of vitamins is folate, and it is found in high levels within arrowroot. Studies have shown that folate is important for expecting mothers, as it can help to prevent neural tube defects in their unborn child. Folate is also an important factor in DNA synthesis and healthy cell division, thereby promoting rapid healing and healthy growth.
  • Arrowroot is extremely low in calories as compared to other starches like yams, potatoes or cassava. For this reason, people trying to remain on a diet can get complex carbohydrates and a wealth of nutrients, as well as a healthy dose of dietary fiber, which can eliminate the desire to snack between meals.
  • Athlete’s foot is a common skin infection of the feet caused by fungus. You can use arrowroot powder to treat this infection by applying it to the affected area. The powder has the ability to absorb moisture and sweat, which makes it difficult for the fungus to grow and spread.
  • Arrowroot powder is also used as a dry shampoo by many. Its moisture-absorbing ability is useful in reducing the greasiness in hair.
  • The anti-inflammatory properties of arrowroot aids in curing bladder infections and urinary tract infections (UTIs). Doctors advise its intake to those women who face frequent infections.
  • The essential minerals present in arrowroot are very good for fighting weakness, fatigue, and cognitive disorders. It also encourages oxygenation of your body’s organ systems and extremities, which can boost your energy levels.

Traditional Uses

  • Topical application of arrowroot powder heals wounds from black spider and scorpion bites.
  • The powder was used to treat the injury from poisoned arrows, hence, the name
  • Apply the powder in the affected area to seize gangrene.
  • Directly apply arrowroot powder to the gums or mix it in juice or other beverages and drink it to get relief from mouth and gum pain.

Arrowroot Nutritional Facts

Arrowroot is a rich source of carbohydrates, vitamin B9, and minerals such as calcium, potassium, magnesium, sodium, and phosphorus. It also has trace amounts of zinc and iron, as well as vitamin B1 and B6. Saturated and unsaturated fatty acids are also found in it in negligible amounts. In addition, it contains fibers and some proteins and lipids too.

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Arrowroot in Cooking

  • Arrowroot makes clear, shimmering fruit gels and prevents ice crystals from forming in homemade ice cream. It can also be used as a thickener for acidic foods, such as Asian sweet and sour sauce. It is used in cooking to produce a clear, thickened sauce, such as a fruit sauce. It will not make the sauce go cloudy, like cornstarch, flour, or other starchy thickening agents would.
  • The lack of gluten in arrowroot flour makes it useful as a replacement for wheat flour for those with a gluten intolerance. It is, however, relatively high in carbohydrates and low in protein (approximately 7.7%) and does not provide a complete substitute for wheat flour in bread-making.
  • Arrowroot thickens at a lower temperature than flour or cornstarch, is not weakened by acidic ingredients, has a more neutral taste, and is not affected by freezing. It does not mix well with dairy, forming a slimy mixture.
  • It is recommended that arrowroot be mixed with a cool liquid before adding to a hot fluid. The mixture should be heated only until the mixture thickens and removed immediately to prevent the mixture from thinning. Overheating tends to break down arrowroot’s thickening property.
  • Two teaspoons of arrowroot can be substituted for one tablespoon of cornstarch, or one teaspoon of arrowroot for one tablespoon of wheat flour.
  • Prepare crunchy fries by dipping potatoes in salt pepper and arrowroot powder and then fry them.
  • It can be substituted for eggs as a binder.

Word of Caution: Care should be taken when consuming arrowroot to alleviate diarrhea. Because excess intake or consuming along with other medicines may cause constipation. Other than that, there is no known danger or toxicity to arrowroot.

References:

  1. https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/other/arrowroot.html
  2. https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-283/arrowroot
  3. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arrowroot

Arnica Montana

Arnica Montana Flower – By Buendia22 – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=72759312

Want to try an all-natural herbal infusion of Arnica? Find it here.

Arnica montana, also known as wolf’s bane, leopard’s bane, mountain tobacco and mountain arnica, is a moderately toxic European flowering plant in the sunflower family. Arnica grows mainly in Siberia and central Europe, as well as temperate climates in North America. Arnica is an alpine plant, grow­ing in nutrient-poor soil. It can potentially reach a height of up to 60cm, but this is unusual given the harsh conditions at high altitudes. It grows in meadows up to 3,000 metres above sea level, where it is exposed to strong sunlight. The higher the altitude, the more aro­matic the plant will become.

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The plants are rich in inulin, a com­pound between sugar and starch that the plants store in their underground organs as a source of energy. It is used as a natural sweetener for diabetics. The Compositae contain selenium and arnica ash is rich in manganese. Both selenium and manganese are powerful antioxidants in the human body and in addition manganese is an essential element needed for healthy bones, wound healing, and the metabolism of proteins, cholesterol and carbohydrates. It may well be that it is this rich source of manganese that facilitates healing, acting in combination with the other plant chemicals. Manganese levels affect the levels of iron, magnesium and calcium in the body.

Generations of Swiss mountain guides chewed arnica leaves to prevent fatigue induced by climbing. The dried leaves were used as a substitute for tobacco, hence its common name of mountain tobacco. The dried flowers promote sneezing, so it was also known as snuff plant. Fall kraut, fall herb and wound herb, other eponyms, demonstrate the age-old use for the effects of trauma.

The flowers are used as a compress for sprains and bruises. Herbally, the plant has been used for traumatic injuries involving bruising, and as a cardiac tonic for weak and weary hearts. It is also used homeopathically to reduce emotional and physical trauma, support the heart, and for weakness and weariness in the elderly.

Arnica is also used to stimulate the kidneys but can be quite toxic in herbal solutions. The ingestion of large quantities can cause irritation to the gut; a temporary stimulation is followed by a depression of the circulation, respiration and temperature. Violent headaches ensue, the pupils dilate and then muscular paralysis sets in. The whole nervous system is paralyzed and death results. Arnica should be used judiciously on the skin as it can cause nasty irritating rashes.

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Mother Jai’s creates all-natural Arnica Oil in small batches in Arvada, Colorado. The herbal infusion is safe to use on the skin and works wonders on injuries and pain. When combined with St John’s Wort oil the benefits are doubled. Find it here.

Resources:

  1. britishhomeopathic.org/charity/how-we-can-help/articles/homeopathic-medicines/a/arnica-montana/
  2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arnica_montana
  3. https://www.mskcc.org/cancer-care/integrative-medicine/herbs/arnica
  4. https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-721/arnica

Allergy Relief Tea

Mother Jai’s Allergy Relief Tea

With February coming to a close we are all starting to think about Spring. Allergy season is just around the corner and we’re all dreading it. So, what’s your plan this year? Suffer with antihistamine side effects or try something different?

Mother Jai’s has the simple answer with her Organic Allergy Relief Tea!

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This simple combination of Stinging Nettles Leaf and Red Clover Flowers and Herb has strong antihistamine (anti-allergy) and anti-inflammatory properties that reduce sinus pressure and stop histamine reactions. All of this without any side effects! No drowsiness! No foggy brain! No painful over-drying of sinuses!

Why Does It Work?

This proprietary blend of Stinging Nettles, Red Clover Flowers, and Red Clover Leaf provides a wide variety of nutrients essential for health. The specific combination of nutrients found in these herbs are known to reduce allergy symptoms with the first dose and to continue reducing allergic reactions and their symptoms with continued use.

The great thing about these herbs is that they are simply nutrient dense vegetables that you would have extreme difficulty overdosing or getting ill from consuming them in tea multiple times daily. They provide support without side effects for the entire season and on if you also struggle with inside allergens.

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Consuming this tea on a daily basis has been known to reduce or eliminate indoor and pet allergies as well, with continued use and depending on the severity of your allergies. You can get relief without feeling drunk and dumb, that’s how drugs like Sudafed always made me feel anyway.

Either way your eliminating the horrible side effects of antihistamines and reducing the chemicals in your body while also getting more water and nutrients. Four very important, and yet so simple, ways to improve your overall health and wellness.

by Uwe H. Friese, Bremerhaven 2003

Stinging Nettles (Urtica dioica): an herbaceous perennial flowering plant originally from Europe, Africa, and Asia. It is cultivated for food, textiles, medicines, and teas worldwide now.

Cooked Nettles taste similar to spinach and is rich in vitamins A and C, iron, potassium, manganese, and calcium. Fresh leaves contain approximately 82.4% water, 17.6% dry matter, 5.5% protein, 0.7 to 3.3% fat, and 7.1% carbohydrates. They must be cooked or dried to be safely handled or eaten.

  • Nettle has agglutinin, acetophenone, alkaloids, acetylcholine, chlorogenic acid, butyric acid, chlorophyll, caffeic acid, carbonic acid, choline, histamine, coumaric acid, formic acid, pantothenic acid, kaempferol, coproporphyrin, lectin, lecithin, lignan, linoleic and linolenic acids, palmitic acid, xanthophyll, quercetin, quinic acid, serotonin, stigmasterol, terpenes, violaxanthin, and succinic acid in its chemical content.
  • Nettle also contains 2,5% fatty substance, 14–17% albumins, and 18% protein in dry matter. Seeds of nettle contain 8–10% fixed oil. 1 kg fresh plant contains 130 mg vitamin C, 730 mg carotene, and oxalate.
  • Stinging hair of nettle contains formic acid, histamine, and acetylcholine.
  • Leaves of nettle contain provitamin A, vitamin B1, K, xanthophylls, and sistosterin
  • Ashes of nettle contain 6,3% ferric oxide, potassium, calcium, and silicium.

Dried Nettles herb has been used in the traditional Austrian medicine internally (as tea or fresh leaves) to treat disorders of the kidneys and urinary tract, gastrointestinal tract, locomotor system, skin, cardiovascular system, hemorrhage, influenza, rheumatism, and gout.

Nettle stems contain a bast fiber that has been traditionally used for the same purposes as linen and is produced by a similar retting process. Unlike cotton, nettles grow easily without pesticides. The fibers are coarser, however.

Historically, nettles have been used to make clothing for 2,000 years, and German Army uniforms were almost all made from nettle during World War I due to a potential shortage of cotton. More recently, companies in Austria, Germany, and Italy have started to produce commercial nettle textiles.

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Red Clover (Trifolium pretense): a short-lived herbaceous perennial flowering plant in the bean family, native to Europe, Western Asia, and Africa. Is now naturalized in many other regions.

Red clover’s flowers and leaves are edible and can be added as garnishes to any dish. The flowers often are used to make jelly and tisanes and are used in essiac recipes. Their essential oil may be extracted, and its unique scent used in aromatherapy.

Red Clover is used in traditional medicine of India as deobstruent, antispasmodic, expectorant, sedative, anti-inflammatory and antidermatosis agent. In alternative medicine, red clover is promoted as a treatment for a variety of human maladies, including symptoms of menopause, coughs, disorders of the lymphatic system and a variety of cancers.

Dietary amounts of red clover are safe, but dietary supplement extracts may cause rash-like reactions, muscle ache, headache, nausea, vaginal bleeding in women, and slow blood clotting. Due to its coumarin derivatives, T. pratense should be used with caution in individuals with coagulation disorders or currently undergoing anticoagulation therapy.

References:

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  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urtica_dioica
  2. https://i2.wp.com/www.compoundchem.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/The-Chemistry-of-Stinging-Nettles-2016.png
  3. https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-664/stinging-nettle
  4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3349212/
  5. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1756464617300944
  6. https://www.compoundchem.com/2015/06/04/nettles/
  7. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/313846106_Chemical_composition_of_stinging_nettle_leaves_obtained_by_different_analytical_approaches
  8. https://pubag.nal.usda.gov/catalog/5640710
  9. https://www.hindawi.com/journals/tswj/2012/564367/citations/
  10. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/stinging-nettle
  11. https://www.verywellhealth.com/the-benefits-of-nettle-89576
  12. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trifolium_pratense
  13. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16566672
  14. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1780253/
  15. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/7211943_The_Chemical_and_Biologic_Profile_of_a_Red_Clover_Trifolium_pratense_L_Phase_II_Clinical_Extract
  16. https://dl.sciencesocieties.org/publications/aj/abstracts/46/9/AJ0460090397?access=0&view=pdf
  17. https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/agricultural-and-biological-sciences/trifolium-pratense
  18. http://powo.science.kew.org/taxon/urn:lsid:ipni.org:names:523575-1
  19. https://www.mountainroseherbs.com/products/red-clover-herb/profile