Basil Leaf

Basil Leaf (Ocimum basilicum)

By Castielli – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7133704

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Basil Leaf

Sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum) is most known for its culinary uses. It’s highly nutritious with an abundance of vitamin A (as carotenoids), vitamin K, and vitamin C. It’s also rich in magnesium, iron, potassium, and calcium. The fragrant herb Basil is best known as one of the most versatile herbs to use in Mediterranean and Eastern cooking.

½ cup of fresh chopped basil (or about eight tablespoons) has roughly:

  • 2 calories
  • 0 fat, protein, sugar or fiber
  • 56 milligrams vitamin A (24 percent)
  • 88 milligrams vitamin K (108 percent)
  • 0.24 milligrams manganese (12 percent)
  • 4 milligrams vitamin C (8 percent)

Health Benefits of Basil Leaf

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Adaptogen: helps the body adapt to stress and to normalize the harmful effects of stressors on bodily processes.

Antibacterial: The basil essential oil was active against every strain of E-coli it was tested with. It was also shown to have anti-microbial properties that were found to fight mold, yeast, and bacteria.

Anticancer: Clinical studies published in Nutrition and Cancer also show that basil contains phytochemicals, which can help naturally prevent cancer, including chemical-induced skin, liver, oral and lung cancers. Basil is able to increase antioxidant activity, positively alter gene expressions, induce cancerous-cell apoptosis (death of harmful cells) and stop cancerous tumors from spreading.

Antioxidant & Anti-Inflammatory: as an antioxidant and help the body get rid of free radicals. Sweet basil is an excellent source of antioxidants such as phenolic compounds and polyphenols. Research published in 2012 showed that these antioxidants make basil a great choice for helping with inflammatory diseases. Because oxidative stress and inflammation are often present with serious illnesses like diabetes and heart disease, this research is promising for combating the increase in these health problems.

Antimicrobial: against a wide range of bacteria, yeasts, molds and viruses. This means you can add protection against the candida virus and various forms of skin irritations to the long list of proven benefits of basil.

Herbal Remedies with Basil

Calming the Stomach: One-half teaspoon of dried or fresh basil leaf in water can often help soothe indigestion and alleviate feelings of fullness.

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Coughing and Colds: chew fresh leaves to calm coughing or make a calming tea of dried basil to help soothe illness.

Facial Steam for Headache: A facial steam with dried basil leaf can help alleviate a headache. Add a tablespoon of dried basil leaf to 2 cups of boiling water in a large pot. Carefully lean over the pot, cover head with a towel and breathe in the steam for 5-10 minutes until headache starts to subside.

Stings and Bites: If you are working outside and get bitten or stung by an insect and don’t have any plantain growing nearby, chewing up a basil leaf and applying to the bite will help relieve the pain and draw out the venom.

Blood Sugar: There is some evidence that basil can help level out blood sugar if consumed regularly and drank as a juice or tea.

Stress Reduction: One herbalist suggests adding 2 cups of strong basil leaf tea to a warm bath to help reduce stress and facilitate relaxation.

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Basil Essential Oil Benefits

Basil Linalool Essential Oil is one of the finest oils available for calming and focusing the mind, and is also useful for easing tension in the head and neck. It is preferred as a mind-clearing oil for spiritual meditation. Due to the high linalool content (which makes this oil very relaxing) you can also use basil to help ease the transition into bedtime. Basil also can help uplift your mood.

Cardiovascular Health: can help the muscles that control blood vessel function to contract and relax, promoting healthy blood pressure. Benefits of basil include the ability to help prevent dangerous platelet aggregation, clumping together of blood platelets that can form a clot within the arteries and cause cardiac arrest.

Cold & Flu: add one to two drops to a steam bath, or make a homemade vapor rub using eucalyptus oil and basil oil that can massaged into the chest to open up your nasal passages.

Detoxification: sickly rats were given basil extract over a period of five days, they experienced significant improvements in producing detoxifying enzymes, higher antioxidant defenses and a reduction of fat buildup in the liver that can cause liver disease.

Fights Depression: Benefits of basil also apply to those with mental disorders or mood-related illnesses, including depression and anxiety. Basil is also considered an antidepressant by some since it can positively impact brain function within the adrenal cortex, helping stimulate neurotransmitters that regulate the hormones responsible for making us happy and energetic.

Insect Repellent: research has shown that the volatile oils found in basil can repel mosquitoes and help to prevent bug bites. To make a homemade bug spray or lotion, dilute several drops of basil essential oils with carrier oil and massage into skin or swollen bites as needed.

Mood Enhancer: Inhaling basil can help restore mental alertness and fight fatigue since it’s naturally a stimulant that works on the nervous system and adrenal cortex. Many people find it beneficial for reducing symptoms like sluggishness, brain fog and poor moods that accompany adrenal fatigue or chronic fatigue. Diffuse basil essential oil throughout your home or inhale it directly from the bottle. You can also combine a couple drops of basil oil with a carrier oil like jojoba and put it on your wrists for an instant pick-me-up.

Muscle Relaxant: you can rub a few drops of basil essential oil along with coconut oil into painful, swollen muscles or joints. To further help relax tense areas and feel immediate relief, try soaking in a warm bath with Epsom salts and a couple drops of lavender oil and basil oil.

Stress Relief: Basil oil is known to be uplifting and renewing, which makes it useful for lowering symptoms of anxiety, fear or nervousness. Used for aromatherapy for centuries to help people deal with racing thoughts and overwhelming feelings, you can burn basil oil at home to relax and unwind. This can also work quickly for natural headache relief. Massage one or two drops with a carrier oil into your feet or over your adrenals nightly to reduce stress.

Basil Safety & Precautions

While basil is generally considered a safe herb in culinary amounts, medicinal use of basil is considered “possibly unsafe” for children and women who are pregnant or breastfeeding. Keep in mind also that basil essential oil (or any essential oil) is very concentrated and merits special precautions. Because basil could reduce blood pressure, in theory, it could cause low blood pressure. Consult your healthcare professional before taking basil (or any herb) medicinally.

References:

  1. https://wellnessmama.com/5505/basil-leaf/
  2. https://www.planttherapy.com/basil-linalool-essential-oil?v=537
  3. https://draxe.com/nutrition/herbs/benefits-of-basil/
  4. https://www.aromaweb.com/essential-oils/basil-oil.asp
  5. https://draxe.com/essential-oils/basil-essential-oil/
  6. https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/basil-essential-oil.html

Intake Questionnaire

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Constitution Questionnaire

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Used by Mother Jai to determine the best course of therapy and support. To ensure you receive holistic (whole person) care.

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Baking Soda

Baking Soda (Sodium bicarbonate)

You can find Baking Soda in Mother Jai’s Toothpowder and Mudd Mask.

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The baking soda chemical formula aka the sodium bicarbonate formula is NaHCO3. This baking soda formula represents its composition of of sodium ions and bicarbonate ions. It’s a substance known for its alkalizing effects thanks to a baking soda ph of 9.

In its most natural form sodium bicarbonate is also known as nahcolite, a mineral that is found in various locations around the world. It is commercially mined in areas of California, Colorado, Botswana and Kenya. There are also large deposits in Mexico, Uganda, Turkey and Mexico.

Baking soda, also known as bicarbonate of soda (or sodium bicarbonate), can do some major things. Its superpowers come from a two-letter term: pH. That stands for “potential (or power) of hydrogen” to make something either an acid or a base (alkaline). Baking soda is an alkaline substance. When it mixes with an acid, it alters the pH level. That’s why it can quickly soothe an upset stomach or cover a bad smell.

Throughout history, it has been used as a rising agent when baking. It’s 100 percent sodium bicarbonate; so, when mixed with acid, it makes bubbles and gives off a carbon dioxide gas, causing the dough to rise. Baking powder and soda are similar yet different since baking powder is made up of sodium bicarbonate and one or multiple acid salts.

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Using Baking Soda

Air Freshening: commercial air fresheners don’t eliminate odors they mask them with chemical compounds that mask or cover up odors. Baking soda is a safe alternative that interacts with odor molecules and breaks them up, neutralizing them. Make your own air freshener – you need: A small jar, 1/3 cup baking soda, 10–15 drops of your favorite essential oils, piece of cloth or paper, string or ribbon. Add the baking soda and essential oils to the jar. Cover it with the cloth or paper, and then secure it in place with the string. When the scent starts to fade, give the jar a shake.

Antifungal & Antibacterial: Baking soda has been shown to kill off bacteria including Streptococcus mutans, which is a type of bacteria associated with tooth decay. It is also effective against various fungal groups including yeasts, dermatophytes and molds that cause skin and nail infections in humans.

Bathroom Cleaner: Baking soda comes in handy because it whitens and disinfects many bathroom surfaces. Make a paste using baking soda and a bit of water. Using a sponge or a cloth, rub the mixture thoroughly onto the surface you want to clean. Wipe down the surface 15–20 minutes later with a damp cloth.

Bug Bites & Stings: it isn’t good for everyday use on your skin, it can soothe the redness, itching, and stinging that are signs of a mild reaction to an insect bite. You can also make your own paste of one-part baking soda to three parts water. This also works for poison ivy and rashes. ½ cup in the bathtub and soak for 20 minutes, rinse off before getting out.

Chemotherapy Support: research does show that it can help some cancer treatments work better. Some chemotherapy drugs need alkaline conditions. Others become more toxic in an acid environment. Mouth and throat changes are common chemo side effects. If this happens to you, rinse your mouth three times daily with a mixture of 1 cup warm water, 1/4 teaspoon baking soda, and 1/8 teaspoon salt, followed by a rinse with plain water.

Deodorizing: When you add baking soda and change the pH balance, the odors in your fridge or your carpet come into a neutral state. Bad smells come from either strong acids (think sour milk) or bases (like spoiled fish). Sprinkle it everywhere to reduce odors. Mix with coconut oil and arrowroot powder for an all-natural deodorant.

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Food Cleansing: Many people worry about pesticides on foods. Pesticides are used to prevent crops from damage by insects, germs, rodents and weeds. Interestingly, recent research has found that soaking fruits and veggies in a baking soda wash is the most effective way to remove pesticides without peeling them. One study found that soaking fruit in a solution of baking soda and water for 12–15 minutes removed nearly all of the pesticides.

Heartburn & Indigestion: Add 1/4 teaspoon of baking soda to a glass of water to zap acid in your stomach. Don’t take baking soda within 2 hours of other medications. When the baking soda lowers stomach acid, it can slow the rate at which your body absorbs some medicines and change the way others work. Don’t give it to a child under 6 unless your pediatrician tells you to.

Inflammation: most inflammation in the body is caused by an acidic environment. Using baking soda can help balance pH of the blood thus reducing the pH of the body, which in turn reduces water retention (edema) related to the body’s response to an acidic environment. The less water retained by the body to protect itself from acids, the less swelling and inflammation and associated pain there is.

Kidney Disease: A daily dose of sodium bicarbonate can help people whose kidneys can no longer remove enough acid from their blood. It helps balance the pH in the blood, reducing the acid content of the body and creating an alkaline environment. Sodium bicarbonate helps in decreasing stone formation and removing of material that causes the kidney stones.

Kitchen Scrub: plain baking soda and essential oils if desired on a cloth or sponge, gently scrubs surfaces without scratching and while disinfecting.

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Mouth Care: tooth decay is caused by acid loving bacteria that live and excrete plaque on teeth and gums. The pH balancing effects of baking soda help prevent bacterial growth by reducing the acids in the mouth. All it takes is ½ teaspoon in 8oz water to make a great, breath freshening, mouth rinse.

Silver Polish: Baking soda is a handy alternative to commercial silver polishes. For this you will need: An aluminum baking pan or a baking dish lined with aluminum foil, 1 cup of boiling water, 1 tablespoon of baking soda, 1/2 cup of white vinegar, add the baking soda to the aluminum baking pan and slowly, pour in the vinegar. Next, pour in the boiling water and then place the silver in the baking pan. Almost immediately, the tarnish should begin to disappear, and you can remove most silverware from the pan within thirty seconds. However, heavily tarnished silverware may need to sit in the mixture for up to a minute.

Skin Care: baking soda is a great exfoliator for face, feet and joints; it helps by reducing acids in skin and balancing pH of the surface, and gently removing dead skin that can clog pores and cause wrinkles. Overuse can cause alkalization of the skin. The skin needs to remain slightly acidic to be strong and healthy. Skin conditions like eczema, psoriasis, toenail fungus, ring worm, body odor and allergic reactions are all caused by bacteria and/or an acidic environment. Both of which are eradicated by using baking soda internally and/or externally.

Cautions

Milk-alkali syndrome: Excess consumption of sodium bicarbonate may cause health ailments such as milk-alkali syndrome. An overdose of baking soda may also cause vomiting, diarrhea, muscle weakness and spasms. Care must be taken while consuming products that contain baking soda. It is advisable to consult your health specialist if you have blood pressure related ailments, kidney disease, are pregnant or breastfeeding as they may have side effects on consumption.

References:

  1. https://draxe.com/nutrition/article/baking-soda-uses/
  2. https://www.organicfacts.net/baking-soda.html
  3. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/baking-soda-benefits-uses
  4. https://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/baking-soda-do-dont
  5. https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-1470/sodium-bicarbonate

Arrowroot

You will find arrowroot powder in Mother Jai’s Toothpowder and Mudd Mask.

Arrowroot is a starch obtained from the rhizomes (rootstock) of several tropical plants, traditionally Maranta arundinacea, but also Florida arrowroot from Zamia integrifolia, and tapioca from cassava (Manihot esculenta), which is often labelled as arrowroot. Polynesian arrowroot or pia (Tacca leontopetaloides), and Japanese arrowroot (Pueraria lobata), also called kudzu, are used in similar ways.

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Arrowroot Health Benefits

  • Arrowroot is used as a nutritional food for infants and for people recovering from illness.
  • It is also used for stomach and intestinal disorders, including diarrhea. Full of undigestible fiber that feeds good bacteria and soothes mucous membranes.
  • Dietary fiber can help to clear out excess cholesterol, further promoting cardiovascular health.
  • Some people sooth painful gums and sore mouth by applying arrowroot directly to the affected area.
  • Babies cut teeth on arrowroot cookies. The anti-inflammatory effects sooth irritated gums.
  • Intestinal problem (irritable bowel syndrome, IBS). Early research suggests that taking powdered arrowroot three times per day with meals for one month reduces stomach pain and diarrhea in people with IBS.
  • The significant levels of potassium found in arrowroot mean that it can be a definite line of defense against heart-related issues. Potassium is a vasodilator, meaning that it relaxes the tension in the blood vessels and arteries, thereby lowering blood pressure and reducing your risk of atherosclerosis, heart attacks, and strokes.
  • It fights various foodborne pathogens such as salmonella virus, preparing the body’s defense system against various diseases and disorders. Researchers have demonstrated the antibacterial effect of the use of arrowroot tea extracts on soups.
  • One particular member of the B family of vitamins is folate, and it is found in high levels within arrowroot. Studies have shown that folate is important for expecting mothers, as it can help to prevent neural tube defects in their unborn child. Folate is also an important factor in DNA synthesis and healthy cell division, thereby promoting rapid healing and healthy growth.
  • Arrowroot is extremely low in calories as compared to other starches like yams, potatoes or cassava. For this reason, people trying to remain on a diet can get complex carbohydrates and a wealth of nutrients, as well as a healthy dose of dietary fiber, which can eliminate the desire to snack between meals.
  • Athlete’s foot is a common skin infection of the feet caused by fungus. You can use arrowroot powder to treat this infection by applying it to the affected area. The powder has the ability to absorb moisture and sweat, which makes it difficult for the fungus to grow and spread.
  • Arrowroot powder is also used as a dry shampoo by many. Its moisture-absorbing ability is useful in reducing the greasiness in hair.
  • The anti-inflammatory properties of arrowroot aids in curing bladder infections and urinary tract infections (UTIs). Doctors advise its intake to those women who face frequent infections.
  • The essential minerals present in arrowroot are very good for fighting weakness, fatigue, and cognitive disorders. It also encourages oxygenation of your body’s organ systems and extremities, which can boost your energy levels.

Traditional Uses

  • Topical application of arrowroot powder heals wounds from black spider and scorpion bites.
  • The powder was used to treat the injury from poisoned arrows, hence, the name
  • Apply the powder in the affected area to seize gangrene.
  • Directly apply arrowroot powder to the gums or mix it in juice or other beverages and drink it to get relief from mouth and gum pain.

Arrowroot Nutritional Facts

Arrowroot is a rich source of carbohydrates, vitamin B9, and minerals such as calcium, potassium, magnesium, sodium, and phosphorus. It also has trace amounts of zinc and iron, as well as vitamin B1 and B6. Saturated and unsaturated fatty acids are also found in it in negligible amounts. In addition, it contains fibers and some proteins and lipids too.

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Arrowroot in Cooking

  • Arrowroot makes clear, shimmering fruit gels and prevents ice crystals from forming in homemade ice cream. It can also be used as a thickener for acidic foods, such as Asian sweet and sour sauce. It is used in cooking to produce a clear, thickened sauce, such as a fruit sauce. It will not make the sauce go cloudy, like cornstarch, flour, or other starchy thickening agents would.
  • The lack of gluten in arrowroot flour makes it useful as a replacement for wheat flour for those with a gluten intolerance. It is, however, relatively high in carbohydrates and low in protein (approximately 7.7%) and does not provide a complete substitute for wheat flour in bread-making.
  • Arrowroot thickens at a lower temperature than flour or cornstarch, is not weakened by acidic ingredients, has a more neutral taste, and is not affected by freezing. It does not mix well with dairy, forming a slimy mixture.
  • It is recommended that arrowroot be mixed with a cool liquid before adding to a hot fluid. The mixture should be heated only until the mixture thickens and removed immediately to prevent the mixture from thinning. Overheating tends to break down arrowroot’s thickening property.
  • Two teaspoons of arrowroot can be substituted for one tablespoon of cornstarch, or one teaspoon of arrowroot for one tablespoon of wheat flour.
  • Prepare crunchy fries by dipping potatoes in salt pepper and arrowroot powder and then fry them.
  • It can be substituted for eggs as a binder.

Word of Caution: Care should be taken when consuming arrowroot to alleviate diarrhea. Because excess intake or consuming along with other medicines may cause constipation. Other than that, there is no known danger or toxicity to arrowroot.

References:

  1. https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/other/arrowroot.html
  2. https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-283/arrowroot
  3. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arrowroot

Arnica Montana

Arnica Montana Flower – By Buendia22 – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=72759312

Want to try an all-natural herbal infusion of Arnica? Find it here.

Arnica montana, also known as wolf’s bane, leopard’s bane, mountain tobacco and mountain arnica, is a moderately toxic European flowering plant in the sunflower family. Arnica grows mainly in Siberia and central Europe, as well as temperate climates in North America. Arnica is an alpine plant, grow­ing in nutrient-poor soil. It can potentially reach a height of up to 60cm, but this is unusual given the harsh conditions at high altitudes. It grows in meadows up to 3,000 metres above sea level, where it is exposed to strong sunlight. The higher the altitude, the more aro­matic the plant will become.

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The plants are rich in inulin, a com­pound between sugar and starch that the plants store in their underground organs as a source of energy. It is used as a natural sweetener for diabetics. The Compositae contain selenium and arnica ash is rich in manganese. Both selenium and manganese are powerful antioxidants in the human body and in addition manganese is an essential element needed for healthy bones, wound healing, and the metabolism of proteins, cholesterol and carbohydrates. It may well be that it is this rich source of manganese that facilitates healing, acting in combination with the other plant chemicals. Manganese levels affect the levels of iron, magnesium and calcium in the body.

Generations of Swiss mountain guides chewed arnica leaves to prevent fatigue induced by climbing. The dried leaves were used as a substitute for tobacco, hence its common name of mountain tobacco. The dried flowers promote sneezing, so it was also known as snuff plant. Fall kraut, fall herb and wound herb, other eponyms, demonstrate the age-old use for the effects of trauma.

The flowers are used as a compress for sprains and bruises. Herbally, the plant has been used for traumatic injuries involving bruising, and as a cardiac tonic for weak and weary hearts. It is also used homeopathically to reduce emotional and physical trauma, support the heart, and for weakness and weariness in the elderly.

Arnica is also used to stimulate the kidneys but can be quite toxic in herbal solutions. The ingestion of large quantities can cause irritation to the gut; a temporary stimulation is followed by a depression of the circulation, respiration and temperature. Violent headaches ensue, the pupils dilate and then muscular paralysis sets in. The whole nervous system is paralyzed and death results. Arnica should be used judiciously on the skin as it can cause nasty irritating rashes.

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Mother Jai’s creates all-natural Arnica Oil in small batches in Arvada, Colorado. The herbal infusion is safe to use on the skin and works wonders on injuries and pain. When combined with St John’s Wort oil the benefits are doubled. Find it here.

Resources:

  1. britishhomeopathic.org/charity/how-we-can-help/articles/homeopathic-medicines/a/arnica-montana/
  2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arnica_montana
  3. https://www.mskcc.org/cancer-care/integrative-medicine/herbs/arnica
  4. https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-721/arnica

Allergy Relief Tea

Mother Jai’s Allergy Relief Tea

With February coming to a close we are all starting to think about Spring. Allergy season is just around the corner and we’re all dreading it. So, what’s your plan this year? Suffer with antihistamine side effects or try something different?

Mother Jai’s has the simple answer with her Organic Allergy Relief Tea!

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This simple combination of Stinging Nettles Leaf and Red Clover Flowers and Herb has strong antihistamine (anti-allergy) and anti-inflammatory properties that reduce sinus pressure and stop histamine reactions. All of this without any side effects! No drowsiness! No foggy brain! No painful over-drying of sinuses!

Why Does It Work?

This proprietary blend of Stinging Nettles, Red Clover Flowers, and Red Clover Leaf provides a wide variety of nutrients essential for health. The specific combination of nutrients found in these herbs are known to reduce allergy symptoms with the first dose and to continue reducing allergic reactions and their symptoms with continued use.

The great thing about these herbs is that they are simply nutrient dense vegetables that you would have extreme difficulty overdosing or getting ill from consuming them in tea multiple times daily. They provide support without side effects for the entire season and on if you also struggle with inside allergens.

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Consuming this tea on a daily basis has been known to reduce or eliminate indoor and pet allergies as well, with continued use and depending on the severity of your allergies. You can get relief without feeling drunk and dumb, that’s how drugs like Sudafed always made me feel anyway.

Either way your eliminating the horrible side effects of antihistamines and reducing the chemicals in your body while also getting more water and nutrients. Four very important, and yet so simple, ways to improve your overall health and wellness.

by Uwe H. Friese, Bremerhaven 2003

Stinging Nettles (Urtica dioica): an herbaceous perennial flowering plant originally from Europe, Africa, and Asia. It is cultivated for food, textiles, medicines, and teas worldwide now.

Cooked Nettles taste similar to spinach and is rich in vitamins A and C, iron, potassium, manganese, and calcium. Fresh leaves contain approximately 82.4% water, 17.6% dry matter, 5.5% protein, 0.7 to 3.3% fat, and 7.1% carbohydrates. They must be cooked or dried to be safely handled or eaten.

  • Nettle has agglutinin, acetophenone, alkaloids, acetylcholine, chlorogenic acid, butyric acid, chlorophyll, caffeic acid, carbonic acid, choline, histamine, coumaric acid, formic acid, pantothenic acid, kaempferol, coproporphyrin, lectin, lecithin, lignan, linoleic and linolenic acids, palmitic acid, xanthophyll, quercetin, quinic acid, serotonin, stigmasterol, terpenes, violaxanthin, and succinic acid in its chemical content.
  • Nettle also contains 2,5% fatty substance, 14–17% albumins, and 18% protein in dry matter. Seeds of nettle contain 8–10% fixed oil. 1 kg fresh plant contains 130 mg vitamin C, 730 mg carotene, and oxalate.
  • Stinging hair of nettle contains formic acid, histamine, and acetylcholine.
  • Leaves of nettle contain provitamin A, vitamin B1, K, xanthophylls, and sistosterin
  • Ashes of nettle contain 6,3% ferric oxide, potassium, calcium, and silicium.

Dried Nettles herb has been used in the traditional Austrian medicine internally (as tea or fresh leaves) to treat disorders of the kidneys and urinary tract, gastrointestinal tract, locomotor system, skin, cardiovascular system, hemorrhage, influenza, rheumatism, and gout.

Nettle stems contain a bast fiber that has been traditionally used for the same purposes as linen and is produced by a similar retting process. Unlike cotton, nettles grow easily without pesticides. The fibers are coarser, however.

Historically, nettles have been used to make clothing for 2,000 years, and German Army uniforms were almost all made from nettle during World War I due to a potential shortage of cotton. More recently, companies in Austria, Germany, and Italy have started to produce commercial nettle textiles.

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Red Clover (Trifolium pretense): a short-lived herbaceous perennial flowering plant in the bean family, native to Europe, Western Asia, and Africa. Is now naturalized in many other regions.

Red clover’s flowers and leaves are edible and can be added as garnishes to any dish. The flowers often are used to make jelly and tisanes and are used in essiac recipes. Their essential oil may be extracted, and its unique scent used in aromatherapy.

Red Clover is used in traditional medicine of India as deobstruent, antispasmodic, expectorant, sedative, anti-inflammatory and antidermatosis agent. In alternative medicine, red clover is promoted as a treatment for a variety of human maladies, including symptoms of menopause, coughs, disorders of the lymphatic system and a variety of cancers.

Dietary amounts of red clover are safe, but dietary supplement extracts may cause rash-like reactions, muscle ache, headache, nausea, vaginal bleeding in women, and slow blood clotting. Due to its coumarin derivatives, T. pratense should be used with caution in individuals with coagulation disorders or currently undergoing anticoagulation therapy.

References:

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  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urtica_dioica
  2. https://i2.wp.com/www.compoundchem.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/The-Chemistry-of-Stinging-Nettles-2016.png
  3. https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-664/stinging-nettle
  4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3349212/
  5. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1756464617300944
  6. https://www.compoundchem.com/2015/06/04/nettles/
  7. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/313846106_Chemical_composition_of_stinging_nettle_leaves_obtained_by_different_analytical_approaches
  8. https://pubag.nal.usda.gov/catalog/5640710
  9. https://www.hindawi.com/journals/tswj/2012/564367/citations/
  10. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/stinging-nettle
  11. https://www.verywellhealth.com/the-benefits-of-nettle-89576
  12. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trifolium_pratense
  13. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16566672
  14. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1780253/
  15. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/7211943_The_Chemical_and_Biologic_Profile_of_a_Red_Clover_Trifolium_pratense_L_Phase_II_Clinical_Extract
  16. https://dl.sciencesocieties.org/publications/aj/abstracts/46/9/AJ0460090397?access=0&view=pdf
  17. https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/agricultural-and-biological-sciences/trifolium-pratense
  18. http://powo.science.kew.org/taxon/urn:lsid:ipni.org:names:523575-1
  19. https://www.mountainroseherbs.com/products/red-clover-herb/profile

Activated Charcoal

Activated Charcoal

Due to our recent discovery of the lead content of bentonite clay MotherJai.com has opted for an ingredient with no known contamination, activated charcoal. Continue reading below for the latest research and information backing the use and benefits of using activated charcoal for mouth care.

Activated charcoal, also called activated carbon, activated coal or carbo activatus, has been processed to make it very porous with an exceptionally large surface area, which makes it particularly adsorptive (electronically absorptive). According to the book “Medical Biochemistry: Human Metabolism in Health and Disease,” activated charcoal absorbs a variety of poisons and toxins, but does not bind well to alcohols, strong acids and bases, carbon monoxide, iron, lead, arsenic, fluorine, boric acid or many petroleum products such as industrial cleaners and lubricants.

Activated charcoal is used to treat poisonings, reduce intestinal gas (flatulence), lower cholesterol levels, prevent hangover, and treat bile flow problems (cholestasis) during pregnancy.

https://motherjai.com/shop/charcoal-mask-8oz-tub/

How Activated Charcoal Works (AmazingHealth.com)

Activated charcoal works by adsorption, which is an electrical action, rather than absorption, which is a mechanical action. Activated charcoal adsorbs most organic and inorganic chemicals that do not belong in the body, but no studies have been able to prove that it adsorbs nutrients, as some people are afraid of. It will adsorb any medications however, and, other than in the case of an overdose, activated charcoal needs to be taken two hours before or after any medications.

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Charcoal added to the diet of sheep for six months did not cause a loss of nutrients, as compared with sheep not receiving charcoal. Blood tests showed no significant difference between the two groups of animals, and there were no visible signs of any nutritional deficiency. A level of 5% of the total diet was given as charcoal. It did not affect the blood or urinary levels of calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, inorganic phosphorus, potassium, sodium, zinc, creatinine, uric acid, urea nitrogen, alkaline phosphatase, total protein, or urine pH.

The form of charcoal used in modern medical science is activated charcoal USP, a pure wood charcoal carbon that has no carcinogenic properties. Activated charcoal is an odorless, tasteless powder. One teaspoonful of it has a surface area of more than 10,000 square feet. This unique feature allows it to adsorbs large amounts of chemicals or poisons. The powder must be stored in a tightly sealed container, as it readily adsorbs impurities from the atmosphere.

Activated charcoal can be used internally and externally for humans and pets for the following:

  • Antidote for food poisoning or accidental ingestion of poisons, poisonous spider, snake, or bug bites, or poison ivy
  • Eliminate toxins that can contribute to anemia in cancer patients
  • Filter toxins from blood, in cases of liver or kidney disease
  • Deodorize colostomies and disinfect wounds (shouldn’t be used on open wounds or you may end up with a tattoo)
  • Remove tartar and plaque buildup when used as toothpaste
  • Alleviate allergy headaches, minor arthritic symptoms, menstrual pains, diarrhea, painful urination, flatulence, sore throat irritation, flu-like symptoms, drug overdose, cold sores, tooth abscesses, and toxin from foods.

Activated charcoal powder will not cause someone to have constipation, but if a person has a problem with constipation and then drinks charcoal slurry, the activated charcoal will back up the colon due to blockages already present in the colon. Research has shown that if a person has a problem with constipation and does a colon cleanse and addressed the cause of constipation, then that person can drink charcoal slurry without having the activated charcoal build up in the colon.

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Health Benefits & Risks of Activated Charcoal BY  JOSEPH PRITCHARD

Charcoal has been used in medicine since the ancient Egyptians used it to absorb the odor of rotting wounds, Drugs.com states. Useful for its ability to absorb impurities, charcoal plays an important role in filtering drinking water and fish tanks and treating acute poisoning. Activated charcoal, also known as medicinal charcoal, is a fluffy, fine, black, odorless, tasteless powder without gritty material.

Benefits of Internal Consumption

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In an emergency, activated charcoal can be used to treat certain kinds of poisoning, according to MayoClinic.com. Being extremely absorbent, activated charcoal helps prevent the poison from being absorbed from the stomach and passed into the body. In the case of severe poisoning, several doses of activated charcoal may be needed to treat the victim. Activated charcoal is not effective against poisons that are corrosive agents like lye, strong acids, iron, boric acid, lithium and alcohols. Furthermore, charcoal should not be used to counteract petroleum products such as leaning fluid, coal oil, fuel oil, gasoline, kerosene and paint thinner because charcoal will not prevent these substances from being absorbed into the body.

Side Effects of Internal Consumption

Common side effects of activated charcoal include nausea, vomiting and constipation, Drugs.com states. Other side effects include bowel obstruction, black-colored stool and a chalk-like taste have also been reported. About 20 percent of patients’ experience vomiting about 10 minutes after ingesting activated charcoal. One case reports that a patient developed a bezoar or mass in his small bowel that caused an obstruction following the administration of 30 to 60 g of activated charcoal via nasogastric tube every four to six hours for five days.

Proper Internal Use in Cases of Poisoning

Activated charcoal is used only for treating some cases of poisoning. Proper doses vary from patient to patient and you must not change your dosage unless your doctor tells you to do so. The powder form of activated charcoal is taken as a mixture of the powder and water with the amount of powder dependent on the age of the patient. For adults and teenagers, a single dose treatment is usually 25 to 100 g, MayoClinic,com states. For children from 1 to 12 years old, the dose is usually 25 to 50 g or the dose may be based on body weight, typically 0.5 to 1 g per kg. For children up to one year old, the dose is usually 10 to 26 g.

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In addition, activated charcoal can be used in cases of food poisoning when nausea and diarrhea are present. Adults take 25 grams at onset of symptoms or when food poisoning is suspected, and children should be given 10 grams. Increase dosage as necessary. Remember, it’s essential that adequate water is consumed when activated charcoal is taken.

Risks Associated with Internal Consumption

Do not combine activated charcoal with drugs used for constipation (cathartics such as sorbitol or magnesium citrate). This can cause electrolyte imbalances and other problems.

Interactions when Consumed Internally

Additionally, activated charcoal can interfere with the absorption of nutrients, supplements and interfere with prescription medications. Take activated charcoal 90 minutes to two hours prior to meals, supplements and prescription medications. Potential adverse interactions with the following drugs can occur:

  • Naltrexone (used for alcohol and opioid dependence)
  • Acrivastine
  • Bupropion
  • Carbinoxamine
  • Fentanyl
  • Hydrocodone
  • Meclizine
  • Methadone
  • Morphine
  • Morphine Sulfate Liposome
  • Mycophenolate Mofetil
  • Mycophenolic Acid
  • Oxycodone
  • Oxymorphone
  • Suvorexant
  • Tapentadol
  • Umeclidinium
  • Acetaminophin
  • Tricyclic antidepressants
  • Theophylline

Do not use activated charcoal as a supplement if you take these medications. Activated charcoal may also reduce absorption of certain nutrients.

Activated Charcoal External Uses & Benefits (DrAxe.com)

Whitens Teeth – Activated charcoal helps whiten teeth while promoting good oral health by changing the pH balance in the mouth, helping prevent cavities, bad breath and gum disease. It works to whiten teeth by adsorbing plaque and microscopic tidbits that stain teeth. This activated charcoal use is cost-effective and an all-natural solution for a bright smile.

To whiten your teeth naturally, wet a toothbrush and dip into powdered activated charcoal. Brush teeth as normal, paying special attention to areas showing the most staining. Sip a bit of water, swish through mouth thoroughly and spit. Rinse well, until spit is clear.

Note: Be careful, for it can (and will) stain grout and fabrics. Protect counters, floors and clothing before using. If you have crowns, caps or porcelain veneers, it’s possible that activated charcoal will stain them. In addition, if your teeth become sensitive, quit using it.

Mold Cleansing – Most people don’t think about mold living in their bodies, but it can. Toxic mold causes depression, kidney and liver failure, decreased brain function, heart disease, eye irritation, headaches, vomiting, impaired immune system function and severe respiratory distress.

Homes that have flooded, or even those with small leaks under a sub-floor or in the walls, can create an environment where mold can thrive. Poor ventilation contributes to the problem, and bathrooms, basements and laundry rooms are particularly prone to mold growth.

If there is visible mold in your home, it must be mitigated properly. It’s important to wear gloves and a protective mask to keep from inhaling toxic mold during cleanup. Activated charcoal, baking soda, apple cider vinegar, tea tree oil and borax can be used to clean mold off hard surfaces and keep mold from growing in the future.

If you or your family experience symptoms including wheezing, rashes, watery eyes, coughing or headaches that aren’t explained in other ways, your home should be evaluated for mold spore levels, even if no visible mold is detected. It can thrive behind drywall, under floors and in ventilation ducts.

Water Filtration – Activated charcoal traps impurities in water including solvents, pesticides, industrial waste and other chemicals. This is why it’s used in water filtration systems throughout the world. However, it doesn’t trap viruses, bacteria and hard-water minerals. According to a study published in the Journal of the Canadian Dental Association, activated carbon filters (activated charcoal), removes some fluoride. Avoiding fluoride and detoxing from it is important for oral health, proper immune system functioning, and healthy kidneys and liver.

Drinking water is essential to good health; however, typical tap water is toxic and laden with chemicals, toxins and fluoride. Ingestion should be limited whenever possible. Activated charcoal water filters are available for whole-home systems, as well as countertop models. Drink 8–10 glasses of pure water per day to help soothe the digestive tract, fight fatigue, keep organs operating, and provide lubrication for joints and tissues.

Skin and Body Health – Activated charcoal uses extend beyond internal applications. For external treatments, it’s effective at treating body odor and acne and relieving discomfort from insect bites, rashes from poison ivy or poison oak, and snake bites.

After a mosquito bite or bee sting, mix one capsule of activated charcoal with ½ tablespoon of coconut oil, and dab on affected area. Reapply every 30 minutes until itching and discomfort are gone. As activated charcoal stains nearly everything it touches, wrap with a bandage.

To treat bites from snakes and spiders, including the Brown Recluse or Black Widow, you want to cover a larger area than just a small bandage, as the bacteria and viruses that lead to tissue damage need to be mitigated quickly.

Create a wrap out of fabric that’s big enough to go around the affected area twice. Dab the mixture of coconut oil and activated charcoal on the fabric, and wrap. Secure with bandages. Reapply every two to three hours, rinsing well between applications.

To treat acne, mix one capsule of activated charcoal with two teaspoons of aloe vera gel, and smooth over face. Let dry and rinse off completely. The activated charcoal binds with environmental toxins and dirt that contribute to acne. It’s also good for spot treatments.

Anti-Aging – Activated charcoal uses include helping prevent cellular damage to kidneys and liver, as well as supporting healthy adrenal glands. It’s imperative to cleanse toxins and chemicals routinely from the body. Activated charcoal benefits major organs by helping the body flush out the toxins and chemicals that cause the damage.

Aging is a natural part of life, but due to the toxic load we are exposed to through food, our homes and workplaces, and our environment, to prevent pre-mature aging we must get rid of them.

For this activated charcoal use, take two capsules per day after exposure to nonorganic foods, heavy meals or after contact to other toxins. This supports better cognitive function, a reduction in brain fog, healthier kidney and liver function, and a healthier gastrointestinal tract.

Activated Charcoal for First Aid – It’s recommend to have activated charcoal as a part of first aid kits, both at home and at work. In the event of an emergency where toxins, drugs or chemicals are ingested, it’s imperative to call 911 immediately. If you have activated charcoal on hand, be sure to tell the operator; the operator may advise to administer it prior to the first responder’s arrival. Depending on the amount of toxins or chemicals ingested and types of toxins, multiple doses may be required. At the hospital, physicians are able to administer more as needed.

Activated Charcoal & Good Bacteria

If activated charcoal is so great at getting rid of toxins and bad bacteria then you may be wondering does activated charcoal absorb beneficial bacteria as well? Well first off, remember that charcoal is adsorbent rather than absorbent. At least one study published in The Journal of Veterinary Medical Science demonstrates that activated charcoal may be able to somewhat differentiate between what it should and should not adsorb.

The researchers conducting this study found that “activated charcoal showed lower binding capacity to the normal bacterial flora tested than that to E. coli O157:H7 strains.” So it appears as though toxin-producing strains of E. coli were more likely to be adsorbed by the activated charcoal while normal bacterial flora in the intestine including Enterococcus faecium, Bifidobacterium thermophilum, and Lactobacillus acidophilus were more likely to be left alone.

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