Stop Making Excuses

How to Stop Making Excuses

In the last Article “Making Excuses”, we discussed the reasoning behind our excuse making. Now we’ll discuss how to stop making excuses and get on with our changes, obligations, goals, and dreams. Because what many of us neglect to see is that our excuses have very serious and lasting consequences. Not only will excuses prevent you from reaching your full potential, but they will also hold you back from recognizing opportunities, talents and skills you might have, to help you overcome your problems.

If you don’t challenge yourself to reach new heights, you will never really know what you’re capable of. New opportunities lie hidden around every corner however you will never find them if you riddle your mind with constantly finding reasons to make excuses. Making excuses can also lead to the following consequences:

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  • Lack of responsibility and growth
  • Self-limiting beliefs
  • Massive regrets
  • Persistent pessimistic outlook on life
  • Bad judgments
  • Paranoia
  • Imaginary walls constricting comfort zone
  • Mental blocks stifling proactive action and creativity

These consequences certainly don’t lead to a fulfilling lifestyle. In fact, they paralyze us and prevent forward movement in all areas of our lives. To overcome your excuses, you must first admit that you are making them. This can be very difficult, but if you want to make your change and achieve your goals you must eliminate the excuses and their consequences.

To help with this process you should ask yourself some questions:

  • What excuses do I tend to make? (write them down, add to it as you recognize more of them)
  • What am I settling for? (write it down, add to it as you recognize more)
  • Why am I making these excuses? (write down your reasons, add to it as you recognize more)
  • How do these excuses prevent me from moving forward? (write it down and review your reasons often)
  • How do my excuses cripple my ability to get what I want? (write it down and remind yourself when you find yourself asking this question again)

Common statements we think to ourselves that stop us from acting.

By Katherine Hurst (www.thelawofattraction.com)

  1.  “It’s too scary to take the risk”. Stop and ask yourself – What’s the worst that can happen? And, how would you deal with the worst that can happen?
  2.  “I don’t deserve the thing I want”.  Of all the limiting beliefs that inhibit successful Law of Attraction work, this is one of the deepest and most insidious. These are often negative words that have been internalized earlier in life. If you’re held back by low self-esteem, one thing that can help is writing down your negative beliefs and pairing them with positive statements (which you can then turn into affirmations).
  3. “What’s meant to be will be.” It’s great to have the confidence and faith that things will work themselves out if you’ve done all that you can on your end to set yourself up for success. But it’s when you decide to just sit back and wait for your “destined” achievement that the problem arises—when you stop taking the necessary action toward a major goal. Stop saying, “What will be will be,” and start saying, “I’ll make it happen.”
  4. “I’ll never know enough”. This is a defeatist excuse for not pursuing the life you want. In truth, great things never happen overnight. There is a wealth of information at your fingertips online, there are classes you can take, and there are always people you can reach out to for help. To get rid of this excuse once and for all, properly familiarize yourself with some success stories from the rich and famous. You’ll find that many of them began with nothing.
  5. “There just aren’t opportunities for me to succeed”. When you catch yourself thinking this way, remind yourself that you are just not seeing the opportunities. If you believe in them and look for them, they are everywhere. Train yourself to actively look for signs from the Universe and tune into your intuition. If you get the sense that something might be an opportunity, grab it with both hands. Plus, you have the ability to create opportunities, which is really the more success-oriented way of thinking about opportunity.
  6. “I don’t really have time to do this”. This is by far one of the most common excuses, partly because it places the blame squarely away from yourself. However, the happiest and most successful people make time for the things that really matter, so challenge yourself to do the same if your goal truly matters to you. A good place to start is by considering ways you waste your time doing mindless activities or thinking unproductively. If you can free up even an extra hour a day, you can use that to accomplish great things. We all have the same 24 hours, the same seven days. Whether you use that time to work toward your biggest goals or waste it, using the justification that “you don’t have the time” is your choice. The only things you should “not have the time for” are negative people and excuses. If it’s important to you, you have to find the time—you have to make the time.
  7. “What I want is unattainable”. As you’ll know from reading about the Law of Attraction, thinking in this way is thoroughly self-defeating. If you think your goals are unattainable, you vibrate on a frequency of lack and the things you want never come your way. If you feel like your dream is scarily large, try to break it down into more digestible mini-goals, and work out a timeframe for each of these (while still holding the ultimate destination in mind).
  8. “It’s not worth the backlash from other people”. It’s natural to care about what other think of you, but don’t let this get out of control. Only the opinions of those closest to you should really matter, and even those people don’t have the right (or the wisdom) to decide what’s best for you. Don’t let fear of judgement stop you from being authentic. No matter how you choose to live your life or what goals you set, there will always be someone who is critical or allows their own hang-ups to get in the way of being pleased for you. Consequently, it’s in your best interests to develop self-esteem that comes exclusively from within (whether that’s through therapy, affirmations, journal work or some other method).
  9. “I’d rather be happy than wealthy.” Why is it that we often treat wealth and happiness as mutually exclusive entities? Think back on your history with money as a child. Did your parents engrave in your brain their hardships with money, telling you that it doesn’t come easy, that it’s the root of all evil—that it’s in control? Your relationship with money doesn’t have to be one of regret or difficulty, and it certainly doesn’t turn you into an evil villain. Sure, some people use their money for horrible things, and yes, wealth might change some people for the worse. But it can also be used for good, and it can change you for the better, improving your comfort, security and influence.  Change your mindset around money right now by believing in the deepest part of your core that you deserve it and will use it wisely.
  10. “I just need to learn to appreciate where I am”. This final excuse is a tricky one, because there is some truth to it. Law of Attraction teachers often emphasize the importance of learning to enjoy life moment by moment, even while you’re in the process of manifesting your goal. The important thing is not to confuse this advice with the idea that you should just settle for less than you really want. If your current life doesn’t fulfill you, push to make it better. You won’t regret it.

Here are some ways to stop making excuses:

  1. Understand locus of control. The first step to stopping making excuses is to examine how much you view life as being in your control. Excuses are often made to shift blame away to circumstances beyond our control.
  2. Internal locus of control is the extent to which you assume responsibility for your actions and believe you can control your life. Having an internal locus of control better focuses you for future success.
  3. External locus of control protects your self-image by blaming fate or others and escaping ownership of your mistakes or failures.
  4. Understand self-efficacy. Your belief in your ability to complete a task greatly influences the actual accomplishment of that task, whether it is a work, fitness, or personal goal. Self-efficacy is based on your past experiences with a task, seeing how others have experienced the same task, how people treat you related to performing that task, and your emotional cues related to the task.
  5. Increase your sense of self-efficacy. There are many things you can do to start building up your confidence in yourself. Small changes allow you to quickly meet goals and start increasing your self-efficacy.
  6. Try making small changes to start. Instead of revamping your entire diet, start by increasing your water intake for a week, then move on to decreasing sugary treats the week after that.
  7. Reflect on past successes. Remembering how you have previously accomplished goals will give you the support you need to accomplish the next one.
  8. Visualize your success. See yourself in that smaller dress size.
  9. Choose a role model. If you are trying to get fit, find a friend who has recently gone through that adjustment herself and look to her for inspiration and advice.
  10. Allow some self-doubt. Don’t expect to be perfect because setbacks and pauses will occur in your journey – setting yourself up to be perfect will only lead to disappointment. Expect to have self-doubt and you can easier adjust and move forward.
  11. Examine your own excuses. Make a list of the excuses you make, consider why you make them, and decide which ones you want to work on stopping first.
  12. Review the excuses you are making about your performance at work. If you find you complain about deadlines, for example, maybe you need to re-examine your workflow process.
  13. Consider what excuses you make about getting healthy. One of the most common is that you don’t have enough time to exercise.
  14. Think about the excuses you make about achieving your life goals.
  15. Develop your problem-solving abilities. Write out what is bothering you, brainstorm how many different ways you can approach the problem, assess the pros and cons of each approach, implement an approach, and evaluate the outcome.
  16. Make a list of your fears. Do you let your fears run the show? Do they keep you in a cycle of excuse after excuse? Write them all down today. Create a list. Look at the fears and read them aloud to yourself. Seeing them on paper diminishes their value.
  17. Write down what you’re doing in response to these fears. After writing down each of your fears, write down what you are doing in response to each of these fears. Know that you cannot fail; by showing up and being the best version of yourself, you have not failed. The mind can play tricks on you, making you live in response to your fears.
  18. Examine your goals. In order to understand how you can better achieve your goals, you need to take a good hard look at them, determine if they are realistic and within your control and your ability, determine what scares you about them, and realize what underlying assumptions you might unconsciously have about them.
  19. Decide on five concrete goals. Put these five goals on paper. Look at them. Start to manifest them. Start to believe you can make them become a part of your life.
  20. Define your goals the SMART way. Make sure your goal is Specific, Measurable, Attainable and Achievable, Relevant and Realistic, and Timely. Once you set SMART goals, you are more likely to achieve them.
  21. Specific goals have a very focused target. Don’t just say you want to improve at work, say you want to gain 5 new clients this month. Thinking of the who, what, where, when, and why will help ensure your goal is specific.
  22. Measurable goals make it easier to see your progress. Instead of saying you want to lose weight, specify that you want to lose 3 pounds this month.
  23. Achievable goals ensure you do not suffer defeat at the hands of unrealistic expectations. You might want to earn more money but a goal of an extra $1000 in sales might be more achievable than $10,000.
  24. Relevant goals make sure that you aren’t wasting time doing something that might not actually help. If you want to be a more flexible dancer, sign up for a gymnastics class instead of joining a chess league this season.
  25. Time bound goals give you a target date. Some people need the push of a deadline. Say you want to have 10,000 words written for your novel – by the end of the month.
  26. For each goal, come up with three action steps to help make them a reality. Create an action plan for yourself. This is what it all comes down to: ACTION. You can understand something intellectually, but it’s a matter of bringing that down into the heart and taking the steps to make these goals and results your reality.
  27. Start taking personal responsibility by shifting to an internal locus of control. Once you assume ownership for making your workplace more efficient, for example, you can be a more effective contributor. Managers and employees who are more confident, initiate action, take steps, and influence others are seen as more respected and feel more successful at work.
  28. Taking responsibility also means owning up to mistakes without making excuses for them. Everyone makes mistakes, but being honest and accountable makes both learning from mistakes and getting over mistakes easier.
  29. Remind yourself that you have the power to influence your situation and environment. You can change if you make the choice to do so.
  30. Create a one-day plan. Start small. Think about what you can do today to make the results you want part of your reality. Maybe it’s talking with a friend about what it is you truly want. Maybe it’s journaling about what inspires you, lights the fire inside, and brings about a sense of purpose and passion.
  31. Be resourceful. Resourcefulness is one of the key factors to overcoming any challenge. Being resourceful includes asking for help so don’t be afraid to turn to your family, friends, or colleagues for assistance.
  32. Tell someone about your plan. Accountability is everything. Knowing that you’re not alone and that someone else is there on the journey with you is empowering. Tell a friend or family member about this plan. Start working with a professional to bring your ideas and visions to life. Remember, you can’t do it all alone and the more love you let in, the more love you let out, and thus the more results you’ll see.
  33. Become a high-self monitor. Self-monitoring is the ability to assess yourself in order to more easily adjust to a situation. Being able to accurately assess your skills, style, and goals in a particular situation affords you the ability to better adapt, and successful adaptation leads to success in goal achievement.
  34. Self-evaluate. Whether it be how many sales you close at work or how often you cook dinner at home instead of ordering take-out, tracking and evaluating your activities is the best way to witness progress, see what’s working, and fix what’s not helpful. Once you can track and accomplish your goals, you can self-evaluate. Be your own critic. Be objective and realistic when you self-evaluate, and remember, “if it is to be, it’s up to me.”
  35. Truly embrace compassion. These changes all start with this one word: compassion. Without compassion, you’re stuck in a cycle of fear and excuses. Compassion allows the love to flow through. It allows you to show up, be authentic, and create the life you want for yourself. You can be your own worst enemy and critic. Talk to yourself like you would talk to a loving friend or family member. Take in the fact that you have a choice each and every moment. Align this choice with the results you want for yourself.
  36. Revise your language. If you find yourself engaging in self-doubt, telling yourself you “can’t do it” or “if only…”, you are buying into an external locus of control and may feel stuck in your present situation. Instead, tell yourself, “I think I can.”
  37. Repeat positive mantras such as “I can do this” or “I’m getting better at this.”
  38. Examine your “if only” statements and reword them positively. For example, “if only I had more time” can change to “I can find 10 minutes a day to do yoga.” Believing in yourself is half the battle.

15 Motivational Quotes to Stop Making Excuses: ‘He that is good for making excuses is seldom good for anything else.’ Lydia Sweatt  March 23, 2017

  1. “It is better to offer no excuse than a bad one.” —George Washington
  2. “He that is good for making excuses is seldom good for anything else.” —Benjamin Franklin
  3. “Never make excuses. Your friends don’t need them and your foes won’t believe them.” ―John Wooden
  4. “Ninety-nine percent of the failures come from people who have the habit of making excuses.” ―George Washington Carver
  5. “We have forty million reasons for failure, but not a single excuse.” ―Rudyard Kipling
  6. “Every vice has its excuse ready.” ―Publilius Syrus
  7. “If you really want to do it, you do it. There are no excuses.” —Bruce Nauman
  8. “A man can fail many times, but he isn’t a failure until he begins to blame somebody else.” —John Burroughs
  9. “We have more ability than willpower, and it is often an excuse to ourselves that we imagine that things are impossible.” ―François de la Rochefoucauld
  10. “The trouble with excuses is that they become inevitably difficult to believe after they’ve been used a couple of times.” ―Scott Spencer
  11. “Difficulty is the excuse history never accepts.” ―Edward R. Murrow
  12. “It is wise to direct your anger towards problems—not people, to focus your energies on answers—not excuses.” ―William Arthur Ward
  13. “Hold yourself responsible for a higher standard than anyone else expects of you. Never excuse yourself.” ―Henry Ward Beecher
  14. “People with integrity do what they say they are going to do. Others have excuses.” ―Laura Schlessinger
  15. “It is wrong and immoral to seek to escape the consequences of one’s acts.” ―Mahatma Gandhi

References:

  1. https://organisemyhouse.com/the-answers-to-procrastination-the-biggest-barrier-to-getting-organised/
  2. https://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-15874/7-tips-to-stop-making-excuses-about-why-youre-not-succeeding.html
  3. http://www.thelawofattraction.com/stop-making-excuses-giving-up/
  4. http://blog.iqmatrix.com/a-life-of-excuses
  5. https://www.wikihow.com/Stop-Making-Excuses
  6. https://www.success.com/article/15-motivational-quotes-to-stop-making-excuses
  7. https://www.success.com/blog/stop-using-these-3-excuses-if-you-want-to-be-successful
  8. Whitbourne PhD, Susan; Excuses, Excuses, Excuses: Why People Lie, Cheat, & Procrastinate. Psychology Today. 5/2010.

Jasmine Oil

Jasmine Absolute & Essential Oil (Jasminum grandiflorum, officinale, and sambac)

Jasmine is known as the King of Oils, Rose is the Queen. This is because of its masculine floral scent that it possesses. It has been known as the King of Oils since ancient times. This highly concentrated oil has many health benefits that may prove beneficial for your life.

You will find Jasmine Absolute in Mother Jai’s Aroma Sprays & Bath Oils.

Origins of Jasmine

Jasmine, also known as the “Queen of the Night” or “King of Oils” is a highly intoxicating plant. Its strong, heavy yet sweet scent has been used for years to invoke love and happiness.

Jasmine belongs to the Oleaceae family. The jasmine plant can grow upwards of 10-15 feet in height or 3-5 meters. The plant has dark green leaves with white flowers. These flowers are what are harvested to be used in the making of the jasmine essential oil. There are over 200 species of jasmine that can get made into essential oil, however, commonly used jasmine for essential oil purposes is common jasmine or Jasminum Officinale Though Spanish or Royal jasmine, Jasminum Grandiflorum , is sometimes also used.

Jasmine grows in the summer and into the fall and the flowers bloom overnight. Because the flowers bloom at night this is when they are harvested to produce the essential oil. Fun fact: it takes nearly 8000 carefully picked jasmine blossoms to produce about 1 gram or 1 mL of Jasmine Absolute essential oil. The flowers have a powerful scent that explodes into the air as they bloom at night. The scent may be strong but it is also sweet in nature and pleasing to the senses. The extracted essential oil is thick in consistency and is a light reddish brown in color.

Jasmine essential oil is extracted from the flowers of jasmine, and it has various scientific names including Jasminum grandiflorum (Royal jasmine) and Jasminum officinale (Common jasmine). The oil is extracted mainly from the latter variety.

Its main components are benzoic acid, benzaldehyde, benzyl acetate, benzyl alcohol, indole, benzyl benzoate, cis-3-hexenyl benzoate, cis-jasmone, ceosol, eugenol, farnesol, geraniol, linalool, methyl anthranilate, p-cresol, nerol, gamma terpineol, nerolidol, isophytol, and phytol.

Blending: Essential oil of jasmine blends well with the essential oils of bergamot, sandalwood, rose, and citrus fruits such as oranges, lemons, limes, and grapefruits.

  • Planet – Mercury, The Moon
  • Element – Earth, Water
  • Quality – Feminine
  • Zodiac – Cancer, Capricorn, Pisces
  • Chakra – Heart

Health Benefits of Jasmine Essential Oil (OrganicFacts.net)

The health benefits of jasmine essential oil can be attributed to its properties as an antidepressant, antiseptic, aphrodisiac, antispasmodic, cicatrizant, expectorant, galactagogue, emmenagogue, parturient, sedative, and a uterine substance.

Relieves Depression: The aroma of jasmine essential oil has a pleasing and uplifting effect on the mind and it actively fights depression. This makes a person feel happy and potentially awakens romantic and poetic feelings, just as it has done in literary and musical history! The aromatic effect of jasmine oil stimulates the release of certain hormones in the body, including serotonin, which results in the boost of energy and the uplifted mood. A study published in Natural Product Communications found that jasmine oil used on the skin over an eight-week period helped participants feel an improvement in their moods and a decrease in both physical and emotional signs of low energy.

Prevents Infections: It is also a very good antiseptic and disinfectant. Its constituents like benzaldehyde, benzoic acid, and benzyl benzoate have very effective germicidal, bactericidal, fungicidal, and antiviral properties. When externally applied to wounds, it prevents them from becoming septic and effectively eliminates potential infections from tetanus. It can also have internal applications, and when inhaled, it is known to reduce infections in the respiratory system and can relieve colds and coughs.

Inhaling jasmine oil, either directly or by infusing it in your home, can help clear mucus and bacteria within the nasal passages and respiratory symptom. Applying it to your skin can also reduce inflammation, redness, pain and speed up time needed to heal wounds.

Mix 5 to 10 drops of jasmine essential oil into your favorite hand lotion and use it as a hand sanitizer. You can make the mixture stronger, or even use it straight from the bottle, too. Run a diffuser with 2 to 3 drops of jasmine oil to kill viruses in the air and fill the room with its wonderful fragrance.

Fight Fungal Infections: Apply jasmine essential oil to sites of fungal infections for quick healing. This oil often doesn’t need to be diluted with a carrier oil. Just put a few drops on your fingers and massage it into the affected area. The fungal infection should clear up within 2 weeks. Be sure to wash your clothes thoroughly to kill the fungal spores there, too. Put 5 to 10 drops of jasmine EO into your laundry along with your favorite detergent or make your own.

Mix 5 to 6 drops in 1 cup of warm water, put the mixture into a spray bottle and thoroughly spray your sneakers if you are fighting athlete’s foot. After the fungal infection clears up, mix a few drops of jasmine EO into your favorite lotion and use it as a moisturizer to keep the fungus from coming back.

Stimulates Sexual Desires: It is actually the aphrodisiac property of jasmine essential oil that makes you feel romantic or in love. This oil enhances your libido and feelings of sexual desire. Due to the aroma, the use of jasmine flowers in bridal accessories and room décor of the newlywed, especially in the Indian Subcontinent is often seen. It also helps cure problems such as premature ejaculation, frigidity, impotence, and other sexual disorders.

Compared with a placebo, jasmine oil caused significant increases of physical signs of arousal — such as breathing rate, body temperature, blood oxygen saturation, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure — in a study done on healthy adult women. Subjects in the jasmine oil group also rated themselves as more alert and more vigorous than subjects in the control group. The study results indicate that jasmine oil can increase autonomic arousal activity and help elevate mood at the same time.

Fades Scar Marks: Are you worried about the scar marks and after spots left by boils, acne, or other wounds? You should definitely try jasmine essential oil. Since it is a cicatrizant, it can help fade those scar marks and after spots. It can also help eliminate the fat cracks that often happen in pregnant mothers.

Reduces Cough: The expectorant property of Jasmine Essential Oil can help you have an undisturbed night of sleep, even when you are suffering from a cough or cold. It provides relief from a cough by helping clear out the accumulation of phlegm in the respiratory tracts. It also eliminates snoring by clearing the congestion from nasal and respiratory tracts. With jasmine essential oil working in your system, you will be kept away from coughing and snoring endlessly through the night.

Treats Insomnia: The properties of jasmine essential oil make it an ideal tool for inducing long, restful, and undisturbed sleep. Its behavior as an expectorant, sedative, and antispasmodic combine to help you indulge in a peaceful good night’s sleep. By reducing signs of insomnia and sleeplessness, you can get more productive at work and in your personal life.

A 2005 study published in the European Journal of Applied Physiology found that jasmine tea odor had sedative effects on both autonomic nerve activity and mood states. Inhaling jasmine along with lavender helped reduce heart rate and bring on feelings of calm and relaxation, which are all important for dosing off and avoiding restless nights.

Emmenagogue: This property is meant to give relief to those women who suffer from irregular, obstructed, or painful menses or an untimely menopause. The emmenagogue property of jasmine oil regulates period cycles, and makes the periods clear and less painful, while also helping to push back menopause. It also provides relief from other problems associated with menses such as fatigue, annoyance, nausea, and mood swings. Regulating your period is also a great way to balance the hormonal levels of your body. It also helps to keep other bodily functions working in a systematic manner, keeping you healthy and fit.

In a study published in the Journal of Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, when menopausal women applied jasmine oil to their skin over an eight-week period, they showed improvements in energy levels, mood and menopause-related symptoms, including hot flashes, pain and depression, compared to women who weren’t using jasmine oil.

Use jasmine essential oil to balance your hormone levels during menopause and get relief from menopausal symptoms. Practice aromatherapy several times a day or put a few drops into a carrier oil or lotion and massage it into your abdomen and back. Actually, you can apply it as an all-over body lotion, if you like. There is a lovely blend for this that includes 1 drop each of jasmine and angelica, 2 drops clary sage, 5 drops geranium and 6 drops lemon essential oil.

Skin Care: Jasmine oil has long been associated with skin care, particularly in terms of treating dry, brittle, or dehydrated skin. However, since it does have certain non-sensitizing effects, it is not always pleasant to use on cracked or open wounds on the skin, as it can cause an allergic reaction, or irritation. That being said, it is still frequently used for the treatment of eczema and dermatitis.

Gently apply jasmine essential oil to bruises to speed healing. You can apply it several times a day.

Mix 2 to 3 drops of jasmine essential oil into 1 teaspoon of a light carrier oil and use this blend to moisturize acne-prone skin. You can also add jasmine oil to your favorite facial cleanser. For individual pimples, put a drop of jasmine oil on your fingertip or a cotton swab and apply it directly on the pimple. Jasmine’s antibacterial, antiseptic and anti-inflammatory properties will clear it up quickly.

Massage jasmine oil into scars and stretchmarks. You will be amazed at how quickly they fade. You can use it straight or mix it into a carrier oil like argan, jojoba, sweet almond or coconut.

Use jasmine oil to clear up eczema and dermatitis. Its anti-inflammatory and antiseptic properties will give quick relief from these uncomfortable skin conditions.

Facilitates Lactation: Jasmine essential oil increases milk secretion from the breasts and is therefore very good for lactating mothers and their new babies. This property also helps protect from breast tumor and cancer.

Promotes & Eases Childbirth: The essential oil of jasmine facilitates and eases parturition and reduces labor pains. This feature can be very beneficial in today’s situations when a normal delivery is a rare sight and most of the cases are handled with caesarean sections. For many women who choose to use jasmine essential oil, they find that the recovery process is less painful and the post-natal period is also shorter. Furthermore, it can strengthen contractions and shorten the time it takes to deliver a baby. At that point, many women suffer from post-partum depression, but jasmine essential oil also combats that tragic condition due to its antidepressant and uplifting qualities.

Practice jasmine essential oil aromatherapy for 30 to 60 minutes several times a day to help get your hormones regulated after having a baby. It will relieve anxiety, boost your energy levels and lift your spirits. Apply the PMS blend to sore abdominal and back muscles for quick relief. You can also fade stretch marks. If you are breastfeeding, wait until after the baby is weaned before you begin using jasmine oil.

Treats Spasms: Jasmine essential oil is very good for treating and relaxing spasms. It provides quick relief from spasmodic coughs, cramps, congestion, asthma, breathlessness, and even spasmodic cholera. It also alleviates intestinal cramps and pains resulting from spasms in other parts of the body. Spasms can be dangerous, disruptive, and even deadly, so any substance that can alleviate this serious condition quickly should be respected.

Soothe Sore Muscles: Massage jasmine essential oil into sore muscles for quick relief. It will quickly reduce the pain and inflammation. Mix 1 tablespoon of coconut oil with 5 or 6 drops of argan oil then add 3 to 5 drops of jasmine oil. The coconut oil has a great consistency for massage and the argan oil speeds up absorption.

Sedative Effect: Jasmine essential oil calms down the body, mind, and soul while bringing forth positive and constructive emotions. It gives relief from anxiety, stress, annoyance, anger, and depression as well as from inflammations of all sorts. Although further research is yet to be conducted, these sedative and anti-inflammatory properties are also associated with pain and discomfort of arthritis and gout.

Cognitive Ability Aide: Jasmine is a natural energy booster. Simply inhaling jasmine in the morning will help to awaken the senses allowing you to be more aware and alert for the upcoming day. It also helps to increase body temperature and heart rate along with the brain’s activity to help increase productivity and learning.

Protects the Uterus: This oil is good for uterine health because it tones the uterus and promotes the secretion of certain hormones which ensure good health and proper functioning of the organ. It also helps protect the uterus from tumors, particularly after menopause, by restricting the flow of estrogen.

Other Benefits: It can also be used to free people from narcotics and other addictions.

Word of Caution: Pregnant women should avoid using this oil until parturition since it is an emmenagogue. It is highly relaxing and sedating and thus heavy doses should be avoided. Again, those who are allergic to jasmine should avoid using it, as with any essential oil made from a known allergen.

How Does Jasmine Absolute Oil Work?

Jasmine absolute oil works in different ways, depending on how you need it. It can be inhaled, diffused or can be simply applied externally. The following are some ways to use your jasmine absolute oil:

  • Through a diffuser. Just add some drops of the essential to your diffuser to provide a relaxing and refreshing fragrance to your home.
  • External application. Apply a few drops of the oil on your neck or forehead to calm and clear your mind, or to feel a surge of hope and happiness. Applying it topically can also treat skin disorders and muscle spasms.
  • Inhalation. Jasmine absolute oil also aids coughs and relieves nervousness and stress when inhaled.

What to Look for When Purchasing Your Jasmine Absolute

What to look for when it comes to purchasing your jasmine essential oil. Well there are a few things that you should look for and note when you are looking for a company or manufacturer.

First you will want to ensure that you are purchasing your essential oil from a reputable company and/or manufacturer. You will want to ensure that this company or manufacturer harvests the jasmine flowers at the correct time, using the correct harvesting methods.

You will also want to ensure that they extract the jasmine essential oil through the process of solvent or enfleurage extraction. You will want to check the ingredients of the jasmine essential oil bottle to ensure you are purchasing true or absolute essential oil and not a carrier oil with jasmine added to it.

Note that the essential oil that is produced year to year can vary because of the environment. This is normal but is something to consider as prices could change to reflect how plentiful or devastating the harvest was that specific year. Temperature, humidity, moisture and other environmental elements can all play a factor in the production and harvest of the jasmine blossoms.

How to Make Jasmine Oil at Home

Jasmine essential oil is not an easy essential oil to produce. Since the jasmine flowers are fragile it makes for a careful harvest and extraction process. The flowers have been known to bruise easily upon harvest which can lead to an unpleasant fragrance when the oil is produced.

In order to produce the highest quality of essential oil, jasmine should be harvested at night when it is full bloom. This will ensure that the chemical makeup inside of the jasmine flowers is at their prime for extraction.

Jasmine essential oil is typically extracted through the process of solvent extraction or enfleurage extraction. Both of these processes soak the jasmine flowers to help extract the essential oil from the flowers.

Enfleurage extraction is done by soaking the jasmine flowers in odorless plant oil or animal fats. Alcohol is then added to the mixture to pull the essential oil from the fat. Then the fat is separated from the mixture and the alcohol is allowed to evaporate to leave the end result of the jasmine absolute.

Solvent extraction is like that of the above enfleurage extraction however water and organic solvents are used to extract the oil from the jasmine flowers. The water and the solvent are then separated and removed from the mixture leaving behind the jasmine essential oil.

It should be noted that the chemicals that are sometimes used in the solvent extraction process can change the chemical makeup of the jasmine essential oil. Do your research on how the extraction is done and what is used in the extraction process.

Both processes can be time consuming and difficult to perform, especially if you do not have the right equipment. That is not to say that it cannot be done, but just note the pros and cons of each process prior to trying it on your own.

Recipes

Homemade Jasmine Oil Perfume

Ingredients:

  • 30 drops jasmine oil
  • 5 drops vanilla essential oil
  • 5 drops lavender essential oil
  • 5 drops orange essential oil
  • 2 tablespoons everclear
  • 1 tablespoon orange blossom water (or distilled water)

Directions:

  • Mix the essential oil blend with the everclear in a glass mason jar or bottle and leave it to sit on a counter top for two days. Keep it covered and somewhere that’s room temperature and away from the sun.
  • Add the orange blossom water or distilled water and stir together. Add the mixture to an old perfume spray bottle or regular aluminum spray bottle. Keep the mix somewhere around room temperature, and use on your skin, clothes, sheets, rugs, etc.

That Time of the Month Massage Blend

Ingredients:

  • 2 drops jasmine essential oil
  • 4 drops marjoram essential oil
  • 10 mL carrier oil of your choice (argan, coconut, sesame, sweet almond, jojoba, grapeseed, macadamia)

Instructions:

  • In a 10 ml roller bottle combine all of the above ingredients together.
  • Mix well.
  • Massage onto the stomach and/or lower back as needed.
SKU 83556

Foaming Face Wash Blend

Ingredients:

  • 8 oz. mild unscented castile soap
  • 8 oz. distilled water
  • 1 Tbsp. sweet almond oil
  • 20 drops jasmine essential oil
  • 10 drops geranium essential oil

Instructions:

  • In a foaming soap dispenser combine all of the above ingredients together.
  • Mix well.
  • Pump one pump into the palm of your hands and massage into face. Rinse
  • Use twice daily as needed.

Bring the Romance Diffuser Blend

Ingredients:

  • 1 drop jasmine essential oil
  • 1 drop patchouli essential oil
  • 1 drop orange essential oil

Instructions:

  • Combine all of the above ingredients together in a diffuser.
  • Diffuse throughout the air to induce feelings of romance and sexual desire.

Jasmine Coconut Sugar Scrub

Ingredients:

  • 10 drops jasmine essential oil
  • ½ cup coconut oil
  • 1 cup sugar

Instructions:

  • Melt the ½ cup of coconut oil in the microwave or over the stove. Make sure it is completely melted.
  • Transfer the melted coconut oil to a bowl and add in the sugar.
  • Mix well.
  • Mix in the jasmine essential oil. Be sure it is well combined into the mixture.
  • Transfer the mixture to a Mason jar and seal.
  • Use as needed in the shower. Apply to the body, massaging it in and then rinse off.

Jasmine Bath Salts

Ingredients:

  • 15-20 drops jasmine EO
  • 3 cups Epsom salts

Instructions:

  • In a glass jar combine the above ingredients together.
  • Mix well.
  • In a warm bath add ¼ – ½ cup of the mixture. Lay back and enjoy!

Here are a few other ideas for using jasmine essential oil:

  • Try adding a few drops of the essential oil to a diffuser to diffuse throughout the room to help reduce depression and stress or to help promote rest and relaxation.
  • Try mixing a few drops of jasmine essential oil with a carrier oil and applying it to sore muscles or wounds on the skin. Also try applying this to the temples or neck to help reduce the feeling of stress and depression.
  • Add a few drops of jasmine to a bath and allow it to help soothe and relax you.
  • Try a jasmine essential oil inhaler for on the go relief.
  • Massage some jasmine onto your stomach to help relieve symptoms of PMS and menopause.
  • Mix a couple drops of jasmine essential oil with your face lotion and massage onto and into the face to help reduce fine lines and wrinkles.
  • Try some jasmine tea to help promote healing, rest and relaxation.

References:

  1. https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/essential-oils/health-benefits-of-jasmine-essential-oil.html
  2. https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/beverage/health-benefits-of-jasmine-tea.html
  3. https://draxe.com/jasmine-oil/
  4. https://www.gurunanda.com/blogs/essential-oils/jasmine-essential-oil-benefits-and-uses
  5. https://organicdailypost.com/21-remarkable-uses-jasmine-essential-oil/
  6. https://articles.mercola.com/herbal-oils/jasmine-absolute-oil.aspx
  7. https://essentialoilsanctuary.com/15-jasmine-essential-oil-benefits-uses-plus-recipes-application-tips/
  8. https://www.sagegoddess.com/product/jasmine-essential-oil/
  9. https://essentialoils.co.za/essential-oils/jasmine.htm
  10. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20046722
  11. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20184043
  12. https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnagi.2017.00168/full
  13. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20184043
  14. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15976995
  15. https://www.wjgnet.com/2218-6190/full/v6/i2/27.htm
  16. https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/Antibacterial-Potential-Assessment-of-Jasmine-Oil-Rath-Devi/4e6a859a3535bdb4f788fe9dbf5ea06b4e26a779
  17. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2529395/
  18. http://www.researchgate.net/publication/236235613_THE_EFFECTS_OF_JASMINE_OIL_INHALATION_ON_BRAIN_WAVE_ACTIVIES_AND_EMOTIONS
  19. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?cmd=search&term=19580857
  20. https://opus.govst.edu/research_day/2017/Presentations/7/
  21. https://www.originalbotanica.com/blog/the-spiritual-and-magical-properties-of-jasmine/
  22. https://www.groveandgrotto.com/blogs/articles/magickal-uses-of-jasmine

Sun Care with CBD

PURE HEMP CBD SUN CARE

CTFO’s Sunscreen & Moisturizer is a gentle, sheer formula enriched with antioxidant that protects all skin types against aging UVA+burning UVB rays.

This water-resistant formula is a 30 SPF, full-spectrum CBD Hemp oil infused sunscreen. Get the benefits of the 20mg CBD moisturizing lotion while protecting your skin from the sun. Tan responsibly.

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Applying a CBD-infused sunscreen before exposure to the sun can help prevent short and long term damage from the sun’s rays and support overall skin health. Sun exposure is the leading reason for the lines, dark spots and skin aging.

For the daily protection and help address previous damage, apply CTFO’s After Sun Care formula, infused with 40mg full spectrum CBD Hemp oil anytime you have been out enjoying the sun.

Get your CBD Sun Care here.

KEY BENEFITS

PROTECTS THE SKIN against damaging UV rays.

STOPS INFLAMMATION to soothe

POWERFUL ANTIOXIDANTS for healthy skin

Coconut Soap

Mother Jai’s Coconut Oil Soap

Home made and hand blended soap made of only Organic Coconut Oil, Distilled Water, and Sodium Hydroxide (yes, Lye). Mother Jai uses only silicon molds for this soap to prevent metal and releasing agent contamination. Silicon is inert and does not release any chemicals into products.

This is a ‘superfat’ blend. That means when the soap is made Mother Jai includes extra Coconut Oil to ensure all of the Lye reacts and to make the soap super moisturizing. This soap produces a wonderful fluffy foam that nourishes the skin and hair. Rub soap bar onto a loofa or wash cloth and scrub face and body.

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As a shampoo bar it leaves hair clean and soft without over drying. It also works great to preserve hair dye as it is not a ‘detergent’ like many commercial shampoos. Hair with bright colored hair dye do extremely well with this coconut oil soap. Simply rub the bar on wet hair until foam forms then massage through hair with fingertips. Don’t forget to massage your scalp to improve hair growth by stimulating follicles.

As a hand soap it leaves hands soft and sanitized without ‘antibacterial’ chemicals. You can use the bar whole or dissolve it for sanitary purposes. Simply break up the soap bar into smaller pieces and dissolve in distilled water. One 4oz bar to 20oz of Water in a jar. Allow it to dissolve completely and pour into soap pump. It is more ‘liquidy’ than commercial soaps because it lacks artificial fillers and stabilizers. This liquid soap works great on surfaces, dishes and clothes as well.

Organic Coconut Oil

Coconut oil soap is an excellent moisturizer for both the skin and the hair. The properties of the coconut oil also help remove dead skin cells and dirt away from the body. The oils also help prevent or reduce acne. It also helps firm up your skin helps you look younger as the soap is rich in antioxidants.

Lauric, Capric, and Caprylic Acid – These fatty acids from the coconut are antimicrobial agents.  They help fight against nasty things like viruses, bacteria, fungi, and yeast.  Who needs anti-bacterial soap when you can just use coconut oil!

Micronutrients – Including calcium, potassium, magnesium, manganese, copper, zinc, iron, selenium, and vitamins C and E.  These micronutrients can pack a world of benefits from lowering blood pressure (manganese) to dandruff alleviation and prevention of skin aging (selenium).  

Antioxidants – Many of these micronutrients also act as anti-oxidants meaning that they block potentially harmful free radicals which can prevent disease and improve skin condition.

Distilled Water

Water that has been boiled into vapor and condensed back into liquid in a separate container. Impurities in the original water that do not boil below or near the boiling point of water remain in the original container. Thus, distilled water is one type of purified water. This means that distilled water is only H2O and all of the minerals, chemicals, bacteria and molds have been removed. This leaves a clean base for making clean soap.

Sodium Hydroxide (NaOH)

Is an inorganic compound with the formula NaOH. It is a white solid ionic compound consisting of sodium cations Na+ and hydroxide anions OH. Sodium hydroxide is a highly caustic base and alkali that decomposes proteins at ordinary ambient temperatures and may cause severe chemical burns. It is highly soluble in water, and readily absorbs moisture and carbon dioxide from the air.

This chemical is used to manufacture soaps, rayon, paper, explosives, dyestuffs, and petroleum products. It is also used in processing cotton fabric, laundering and bleaching, metal cleaning and processing, oxide coating, electroplating, and electrolytic extracting. It is commonly found in commercial drain/ oven cleaners. According to the the FDA, sodium hydroxide is considered a direct food recognized as safe, where it serves as a pH control agent and follows good manufacturing guidelines. Interestingly, sodium hydroxide has been studied for its use in the treatment of prion disease (as occurs in mad cow disease and kuru). The use of this compound has been shown to effectively reduce prion levels in an in vitro inactivation assay.

Sodium hydroxide is used in several food processing applications, such as curing foods like olives or helping to brown Bavarian-style pretzels, giving them their characteristic crunch. Sodium hydroxide is used to remove skins from tomatoes, potatoes and other fruits and vegetables for canning and also as an ingredient in food preservatives that help prevent mold and bacteria from growing in food.

Get your home made superfat lye soap here.

Lye Soap

Soap is the result of a chemical reaction called saponification that occurs between lye and a type of molecule called a triglyceride (a fat or oil), where both substances are chemically transformed, creating soap and natural glycerin. Neither of the original ingredients exists anymore. All the lye – either sodium hydroxide for bar soap or potassium hydroxide for liquid soap – is consumed in the reaction.

So, while soap is made with lye, it doesn’t contain lye. Modern methods and measuring scales – as opposed to what was available to frontier women – allow soap-makers to use the proper mixture of oils and lye, ensuring that all lye is consumed. In addition, many soap-makers, including Mother Jai’s, add more oil than is required for the chemical reaction, further ensuring the neutralization of lye and adding to the soap’s moisturizing qualities. Including extra fats in the mixture is known as superfatting.

Still, some soap-makers make a point of positioning themselves as lye “alternatives,” insisting – for example – they use glycerin instead, or make their soap without the involvement of lye. In both these cases, misinformation seems to be a factor. Glycerin is a natural result of saponification. And the first step in creating bases for melt-and-pour soap-making – the most convenient home-based process? Saponification.

Understanding chemistry can go a long way toward informing public perceptions, including those of your customers. As negative as some perceptions of lye can be, all soap is made with lye – whether it’s bar or liquid – and soap made well can be great for your skin. The distinction between soap and commercial cleansers is especially clear with liquid soaps. Since most weren’t made with lye, what you’re buying isn’t soap, but a factory-made detergent for the skin. These are chemical emulsifiers usually derived from petroleum.

The truth about lye in soap-making is simple: there is no true soap, as defined by the FDA, without lye. There’s also a huge difference between “made with lye” and “containing lye.”

Lye isn’t a villain, nor is soap made with lye something to avoid. In fact, in the hands of good soap-makers, it’s a product made with your skin and health in mind, and is far superior in overall quality and gentleness to commercial, non-soap cleansers. Lye is what you should be using.

Get your home made superfat lye soap here.

By Walkerma – Own work, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=5190866

Benefits Using of Lye Soap

Despite popular belief, lye soap is not harsh and it doesn’t burn skin. When farmers and homesteaders in the past made soap, they did not use correct proportions of lye and fats. They produced soap with residual lye in it. That soap burned skin. Unfortunately, the oldies ruined reputation of lye soap for us. Fortunately, modern homesteaders and soap makers have great resources available to them to make lye soap that is cleansing, soothing, conditioning, and pampering.

General Skin Care : Daily pampering with lye soap cleanses and conditions skin, gets rid of dry and itchy skin, rashes and irritations.

Acne Cure: Lye soap unclogs pores, reduces inflammation, and balances skin pH. Washing face with lye soap daily reduces acne and blackheads. It leaves skin silky and radiant.

Balancing Dry or Oily Skin: Lye soap fends both dry skin and oily skin. The way it works is very simple and ingenious.

  • Dry skin: Glycerin in the soap moisturizes dry skin. There is very little need or no need at all to use lotions any more.
  • Oily skin: This is the type of skin that has overactive oil (sebaceous) glands. When harsh soaps are used on oily skin, they make skin overly dry, but just for a short period of time. Oily skin reacts to dryness by producing extra lubricants by the oil glands. Such skin becomes oily almost immediately after washing.

Using lye soap on oily skin leaves the skin mildly moisturized by glycerin. Under these conditions, the oily skin doesn’t have to work overtime to produce oils any more. You must be patient though. This doesn’t happen overnight. You have to “train” your oily skin to slow down oil production by the hyperactive glands. It may take weeks to achieve noticeable results.

Seborrheic Dermatitis & Dandruff Treatment: Lye soap is used in the treatment of seborrhea and dandruff. Simply washing your hair and affected areas with lye soap reduces the flaky skin and irritation. Some lye soaps prescribed by dermatologists are medicated with aspirin, coal tar, zinc, or other additives.

Eczema, Psoriasis Relief: Because of the emollient qualities of lye soap, it is used by people with eczema and psoriasis to relief itching, irritation, and minimize the symptoms.

Sun Burn Treatment and Prevention: Using lye soap on the bare skin before going out in the sun minimizes sunburns. Lye soap helps cure inflamed skin if the sunburns already happened. Lather lye soap on the sunburned area and leave it overnight. Repeat until sunburn is gone. Lye soap speeds up the healing process.

Poison Ivy, Poison Oak, Poison Sumac Treatment: Washing the affected skin area with lye soap immediately after contact with the poisonous plants may help avoid the reaction altogether. If some time is passed after the contact, the reaction is very likely to happen. To minimize the reaction, wash the area with lye soap as soon as possible, and rinse with water. Repeat washing a few times. Lather lye soap on the affected skin and leave it on until the next wash. Skin reaction will disappear soon.

Insect Bites Cure and Insect Repellent: Washing the bites with lye soap reliefs itching and swelling almost immediately. Lather lye soap on your bare skin to repel mosquitoes. A bar of lye soap in your kitchen cabinets will keep ants in check.

Lye Soap Slows Down Skin Aging: Soothing, moisturizing, and antioxidant qualities of lye soap slows down formation of wrinkles and age spots when used daily.

Hunters’ Trick (can be a health benefit at times): Wash with unscented lye soap to become “invisible” when you go hunting. Lye soap removes human scent and animals become unaware of you presence. Happy hunting!

Get your home made superfat lye soap here.

Making Excuses

What is an Excuse?

The definition of an excuse includes –

  • To make an allowance for; to grant pardon to; to overlook or forgive.
  • To apologize for an act that could cause offense.
  • To explain in the hope of being forgiven or understood; to justify.
  • To free, as from obligation or duty; be exempt.
  • To give permission to leave; release from obligation.
  • An explanation offered to justify or obtain forgiveness.
  • A reason or grounds for excusing.
  • A note explaining an absence.
  • Used to acknowledge and ask forgiveness for an action that could cause offense.
  • Used to request that something be repeated.

Excuses are rationalizations we make to ourselves about people, events and circumstances. They are invented reasons we create to defend our behavior, to neglect taking a particular kind of action, or simply as a means of negating responsibility. Excuses are in essence a means of placing blame OF an internal problem ON an external condition.

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So, in other words we use excuses to help ourselves feel better about not doing something that really should be done, or we feel needs to be done. Or to help ourselves feel ‘okay’ about our reactions to situations or people. It is our way of procrastinating; our way of putting difficult tasks off until we feel comfortable doing them, or until we’re shamed in to doing them. Procrastination is the main thing that will stop you from getting organized and achieving your goals. It is the excuses we develop and use to help us avoid doing something and it comes in many forms.

Everyone at some point or another has put something off or has found themselves with an obligation that they may not want to fulfill. Whether it was forced upon them or it was a choice that they made. If we really don’t want to do something we will find a way to get out of it and we’ll talk ourselves into feeling comfortable with not doing it. Our excuses are our reasoning of WHY we don’t want to do it.

Stop and think about the time you decided you needed to make a change in your life like losing weight or exercising more. It was important to you, at least for a moment, until you started thinking about what you will have to do to accomplish your goal or complete the obligation. Then what did you do? Did you find reasons to avoid taking steps or did you find ways to get started?

Most of the time, excuses are voiced over and over in your head until you believe them and feel they are the truth. Then your reality becomes exactly everything your avoiding. The lies or excuses build on top of each other and eventually you’re struggling to maintain the façade.

If you could understand the WHY of your excuses, maybe you could eliminate them and achieve your desires, accomplish your goals, and be successful in your life.  That is the purpose behind this article, to help us all stop making excuses and live to our fullest potential. To dig deeper into our excuses that stop our progress and hinder our happiness. To turn the excuses for why you can’t do it into reasons for why it’s already done.

According to Susan Whitbourne PhD, there are four basic reasons why we make excuses or lie to ourselves and others to avoid doing what we don’t want to do. Or to avoid the consequences of not doing what we’re supposed to do. These include reinforcement, memory distortion, protection of a positive sense of identity, and the self-serving bias.

The first reason for making excuses is reinforcement. This is the process of getting away with a lie or excuse we make to ourselves or others and feeling that it is okay to do it again since you were never caught. The more often you get away with lying, cheating, and making excuses the more comfortable you will feel with doing it again.

The second reason for making excuses is memory distortion. This occurs when the lies and excuses have built upon each other and have become a form of reality for you. You have lied and backed up your lies for so long they become a part of your personal history.

The third reason for making excuses is the protection of a positive sense of identity. This is where we convince ourselves and others that the lies and excuses we have repeated over and over are legitimate reality. We do this to avoid admitting that we were dishonest, to keep ourselves looking good.

Finally, the fourth reason for making excuses is our self-serving bias. This is the way we see ourselves and our situations. We see a situation, event, or person as wrong or the cause of our action or reaction. We don’t see that it is wrong to lie so that we can feel okay about being dishonest. This is called the ‘fundamental attribution error’ in which you may demoralize someone else that lies while making excuses for your own lies.

As you can see there are ‘complex and interlocking’ reasons for lying, cheating, and fabricated excuse-making. People are constantly dodging, lying, and trying to remember their lies and excuses. They’re shortchanging themselves because these behaviors prevent them from achieving their full potential and feeling maximum fulfillment.

Anything that you find difficult in life tends to be procrastinated over – it’s human nature. If you can determine your reasons for procrastination, then you are already past the main hurdle in getting over it. These are some common reasons used for not doing something.

Reason #1: Time Issues

We’ve all said, at least once – I have no free time. There’s something else that has to be done. I’ll start tomorrow. I will make it my New Year’s resolution.

So instead let’s say – I will have more time to get more done if I get organized. If my schedule, work, and home are organized I will have more time to do what I want. I am starting now so that I can to what I love.

Reason #2: Fear Issues

We’ve all said, at least once – What if it goes wrong? What will others say? What if I get organized and then can’t keep up? What if I fail?

So instead let’s say – What’s the worst that can happen? Why does it matter what others think? I will plan how to achieve my goals. I know that if I fail I can always start over again. I will rid myself of the physical and emotional baggage that I do not need.

Reason #3: Perfectionist Issues

We’ve all said, at least once – I don’t want to start something unless I can complete it 100%. I need a full week off to get everything done. I won’t start until I have everything I need to get organized. This just isn’t right, I feel it should be better.

So instead let’s say – It doesn’t have to be 100% complete. Nothing is ever perfect. I will work on one thing each day to get it all done. Change is inevitable, and I can keep up with it. I am so well organized I can accomplish everything I need to.

Reason #4: Lack of Energy

We’ve all said, at least once – it’s boring. Why should I bother? I don’t have enough energy to start. It’s too much hassle. Isn’t it easier to stay just as I am?

So instead let’s say – I’ll get it done then do something I like to do. I’ll tell my friend, so he or she can provide moral support. I want to do this, and I am going to start now. I would feel so much better doing this instead of putting it off. I want to change.

Other Reasons for Excuses

There are many reasons why people make excuses. In fact everyone has different reasons for making them. However, when it boils down to it, we only make excuses for the following main reasons:

  • Fear of Failure
  • Fear of Embarrassment
  • Fear of Success
  • Fear of Change
  • Fear of Uncertainty
  • Fear of Responsibility
  • Fear of Making Mistakes
  • Perceived lack of confidence or resources

To eliminate excuses from our lives we must first look at eliminating all traces of fear.  Fear traps and locks us away within our comfort zone. Yet fear often develops as a result of a lack of understanding, information, resources, experience or perspective. If you lack all these things, you will naturally lack confidence, and as a result you will fail to take the action necessary to achieve your goals and objectives. Consequently, you will tend to make excuses about your life and circumstances in order to help boost your self-esteem. However, all you’re doing is creating the illusion of security. You’re simply masking the pain by taking a pain killer. The pain is still there, and will continue to persist until you finally overcome your fears.

These all give us an idea of the unconscious choices we often make to avoid being uncomfortable. So now we know what we can avoid or alter to improve our situations. In the next article “Stop Making Excuses” we’ll discuss ways to become more organized and learn how to stop making excuses.

References:

  1. https://organisemyhouse.com/the-answers-to-procrastination-the-biggest-barrier-to-getting-organised/
  2. http://blog.iqmatrix.com/a-life-of-excuses
  3. Whitbourne PhD, Susan; Excuses, Excuses, Excuses: Why People Lie, Cheat, & Procrastinate. Psychology Today. 5/2010.