Frankincense

Frankincense Resin & Oil (Boswellia carterii, serrata, sacra)

Frankincense is an aromatic resin used in incense and perfumes, obtained from trees of the genus Boswellia in the family Burseraceae, particularly Boswellia sacra (syn: B. bhaw-dajiana), B. carterii, B. frereana, B. serrata (B. thurifera, Indian frankincense), and B. papyrifera. The English word is derived from Old French “franc encens” (i.e., high quality incense). There are four main species of Boswellia that produce true frankincense. Resin from each of the four is available in various grades, which depend on the time of harvesting. The resin is then hand-sorted for quality.

Olibanum is characterised by a balsamic-spicy, slightly lemon, fragrance of incense, with a conifer-like undertone. It is used in the perfume, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries.

Advertisement

You will find Frankincense in many of Mother Jai’s products.

Chemical Composition: Structure of β-boswellic acid, one of the main active components of frankincense. These are some of the chemical compounds present in frankincense:

  • “acid resin (56 %), soluble in alcohol and having the formula C20H32O4”
  • gum (similar to gum arabic) 30–36%
  • 3-acetyl-beta-boswellic acid (Boswellia sacra)
  • alpha-boswellic acid (Boswellia sacra)
  • 4-O-methyl-glucuronic acid (Boswellia sacra)
  • incensole acetate, C21H34O3
  • phellandrene
  • (+)-cis- and (+)-trans-olibanic acids

Blending: Frankincense oil blends well with other oils such as Lime, Lemon, Orange and other Citrus oils as well as Benzoin, Bergamot, Lavender, Myrrh, Pine, and Sandalwood oil. This makes it a popular element of various aromatherapy combinations.

Boswellia sacra (frankincense) – Boswellia sacra trees in Dhofar, southern province of the Sultanate of Oman (Photo: Helen Pickering)

Uses for Frankincense

Boswellia serrata is a tree native to India that produces special compounds that have been found to have strong anti-inflammatory, and potentially anti-cancer, effects. Among the valuable boswellia tree extracts that researchers have identified, several stand out as being most beneficial, including terpenes and boswellic acids, which are strongly anti-inflammatory and protective over healthy cells.

Frankincense is used in perfumery and aromatherapy. It is also an ingredient that is sometimes used in skincare. The essential oil is obtained by steam distillation of the dry resin. Some of the smells of the frankincense smoke are products of pyrolysis.

Advertisement

Frankincense oil is used by either inhaling the oil or absorbing it through the skin, usually mixed with a carrier oil, such as an unscented lotion or jojoba oil. It’s believed that the oil transmits messages to the limbic system of the brain, which is known to influence the nervous system. A little bit of oil goes a long way; it should not be ingested in large quantities as it can be toxic.

Frankincense Essential Oil

The health benefits of frankincense essential oil can be attributed to its properties as an antiseptic, disinfectant, astringent, carminative, cicatrizant, cytophylactic, digestive, diuretic, emmenagogue, expectorant, sedative, tonic, uterine, and a vulnerary substance. Frankincense oil relieves pain associated with rheumatism and arthritis. It helps to heal boils, infected wounds, acne, circulatory problems, insomnia, and various types of inflammation as well.

The essential oil of frankincense is produced by steam distillation of the tree resin. The oil’s chemical components are 75% monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, monoterpenoles, sesquiterpenols and ketones. It has a good balsamic sweet fragrance, while the Indian frankincense oil has a very fresh smell. Contrary to what some commercial entities claim, steam or hydro distilled frankincense oils do not contain boswellic acids (triterpenoids), although may be present in trace quantities in the solvent extracted products. The chemistry of the essential oil is mainly monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, such as alpha-pinene, Limonene, alpha-Thujene, and beta-Pinene with small amounts of diterpenoid components being the upper limit in terms of molecular weight.

Benefits of Frankincense Oil (DrAxe.com)

  1. Helps Reduce Stress Reactions and Negative Emotions: When inhaled, it’s been shown to reduce heart rate and high blood pressure. It has anti-anxiety and depression-reducing abilities, but unlike prescription medications, it does not have negative side effects or cause unwanted drowsiness.
  2. Helps Boost Immune System Function and Prevents Illness: Studies have demonstrated that frankincense has immune-enhancing abilities that may help destroy dangerous bacteria, viruses and even cancers.
  3. May Help Fight Cancer or Deal with Chemotherapy Side Effects: Frankincense oil has been shown to help fight cells of specific types of cancer.
  4. Astringent and Can Kill Harmful Germs and Bacteria: Frankincense is an antiseptic and disinfectant. It has the ability to eliminate cold and flu germs from the home and the body naturally and can be used in place of chemical household cleaners.
  5. Improves Oral Health: The same antiseptic qualities also make frankincense oil a useful preventive measure against oral issues, like bad breath, toothaches, cavities, mouth sores, and other infections.
  6. Heals Skin and Prevents Signs of Aging: Frankincense has the ability to strengthen skin and improve its tone, elasticity, defense mechanisms against bacteria or blemishes, and appearance as someone ages. It helps tone and lift skin, reduces appearance of scars and acne, and heals wounds. It can also be beneficial for fading of stretch marks, surgery scars or marks associated with pregnancy, and for healing dry or cracked skin.
  7. Balances Hormone Levels: Frankincense oil reduces symptoms associated with menstruation and menopause by balancing hormone levels. It can help relieve pain, cramps, constipation, headaches, anxiety, nausea, fatigue and mood swings. Frankincense oil also helps with regulating estrogen production and may reduce the risk of tumor or cyst development in premenopausal women.
  8. Reduces Scars: This is an interesting property of Frankincense oil. When applied topically or inhaled, it can make the scars and marks of boils, acne, and pox on the skin fade at a much faster rate. This also includes the fading of stretch marks, surgery marks, and fat cracks associated with pregnancy and delivery.
  9. Eases Digestion: Frankincense helps the digestive system properly detox and to produce bowel movements, reduces pain and cramping in the stomach, can relieve nausea, helps flush out excess water from the abdomen that can cause bloating and even relieves PMS-related stomach pains.
  10. Acts as a Sleep Aid: Frankincense essential oil is useful in lowering levels of anxiety or chronic stress that can keep you up at night. It has a calming, grounding scent that can naturally help you to fall asleep. It helps open breathing passages, allows your body to reach an ideal sleeping temperature and can eliminate pain that keeps you up.
  11. Helps Decrease Inflammation and Pain: Frankincense can inhibit the production of key inflammatory molecules associated with conditions like arthritis, asthma, painful bowel disorders like IBS and many more conditions.
  12. Acts as Tonic: Overall, frankincense essential oil tones and boosts health and is, therefore, considered a tonic. It benefits all the systems operating in the body, including the respiratory, digestive, nervous, and excretory systems, while also increasing strength by aiding the absorption of nutrients into the body. Furthermore, frankincense oil strengthens the immune system and keeps you strong.
  13. Stimulates Urination: If you think that Lasix and its variants are the only drugs that can help you release water from the body through urination, you are incorrect. These pharmaceutical options may be instantaneous, but not very safe. Frankincense essential oil is a natural and safe alternative. It promotes urination and helps you lose that extra water weight, as well as fats, sodium, uric acid, and various other toxins from the body, with the added advantage of lowering blood pressure. The best part about this is that frankincense essential oil is completely safe and has no adverse side effects.
  14. Reduces Respiratory Issues: It soothes cough and eliminates phlegm deposited in the respiratory tracts and the lungs. Frankincense essential oil also provides relief from bronchitis and congestion of nasal tract, larynx, pharynx, bronchi, and lungs. Its antidepressant and anti-inflammatory properties also help relax the breathing passages, which can reduce the dangers of asthma attacks, and its antiseptic qualities give it the reputation of being an immune system booster! It also eases body pain, headaches, toothaches, and balances the rise in body temperature commonly associated with colds.

Using Frankincense at Home

  1. Stress-Relieving Bath Soak: Frankincense oil immediately induces the feeling of peace, relaxation and satisfaction. Add a few drops of frankincense oil to a hot bath for stress relief.  You can also add frankincense to an oil diffuser or vaporizer to help fight anxiety and for experiencing relaxation in your home all the time. Some people believe that the fragrance of frankincense can increase your intuition and spiritual connection.
  2. Natural Household Cleaner: Frankincense oil is an antiseptic, meaning it helps eliminate bacteria and viruses from your home and clean indoor spaces. The plant has been commonly burned to help disinfect an area and is used as a natural deodorizer. Use it in an essential oil diffuser to help reduce indoor pollution and deodorize and disinfect any room or surface in your home.
  3. Natural Hygiene Product: Due to its antiseptic properties, frankincense oil is a great addition to any oral hygiene regimen. Look for natural oral care products that contain frankincense oil, especially if you enjoy the aroma. It can help prevent dental health issues like tooth decay, bad breath, cavities or oral infections. You can also consider making your own toothpaste by mixing frankincense oil with baking soda.
  4. Anti-Aging and Wrinkle Fighter: Frankincense essential oil is a powerful astringent, meaning it helps protect skin cells. It can be used to help reduce acne blemishes, the appearance of large pores, prevent wrinkles, and it even helps lift and tighten skin to naturally slow signs of aging. The oil can be used anywhere where the skin becomes saggy, such as the abdomen, jowls or under the eyes. Mix six drops of oil to one ounce of unscented oil and apply it directly to the skin. Be sure to always do a small patch area test first to test for possible allergic reactions.
  5. Relieves Symptoms of Indigestion: If you have any digestive distress, such as gas, constipation, stomach aches, irritable bowel syndrome, PMS or cramps, frankincense oil can help relieve gastrointestinal discomfort. It helps speed up the digestion of food, similar to digestive enzymes. Add one to two drops of oil to eight ounces of water or to a tablespoon of honey for GI relief. If you’re going to ingest it orally, make sure it’s 100 percent pure oil; do not ingest fragrance or perfume oils.
  6. Scar, Wound, Stretch Mark or Acne Remedy: Frankincense oil can help with wound healing and may decrease the appearance of scars. It may also help reduce the appearance of dark spots caused from acne blemishes, stretch marks, eczema and help with healing of surgical wounds. Mix two to three drops of oil with an unscented base oil or lotion and apply directly to skin. Be careful not to apply it to broken skin, but it’s fine for skin that’s in the process of healing.
  7. Natural Cold or Flu Medicine: Next time you have a respiratory infection from a cold or flu, use frankincense essential oil to help provide relief from coughing. It can help eliminate phlegm in the lungs. It also acts as an anti-inflammatory in the nasal passages, making breathing easier, even for those with allergies or asthma. Add a few drops to a cloth and inhale for the respiratory benefits or use an oil diffuser.
  8. Helps Relieve Inflammation and Pain: To improve circulation and lower symptoms of joint pain or muscle pain related to conditions like arthritis, digestive disorders and asthma, try massaging frankincense oil to the painful area or diffusing it in your home. You can add a drop of oil to steaming water and soak a towel in it, then place the towel on your body or over your face to inhale it to decrease muscle aches. Also diffuse several drops in your home or combine several drops with a carrier oil to massage into your muscles, joints, feet or neck.
Boswellia sacra-habitat and leaf morphology. This tree grows wildly in the Dhofar region of Oman. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0169794.g001
https://www.researchgate.net/figure/Boswellia-sacra-habitat-and-leaf-morphology-This-tree-grows-wildly-in-the-Dhofar-region_fig4_312317670

History of Frankincense

Frankincense has been traded on the Arabian Peninsula for more than 5000 years. A mural depicting sacks of frankincense traded from the Land of Punt adorns the walls of the temple of ancient Egyptian Queen Hatshepsut, who died circa 1458 BC.

Frankincense was one of the consecrated incenses (Ha-Ketoret) described in the Hebrew Bible and Talmud used in Ketoret ceremonies, an important component of the services in the Temple in Jerusalem. It was offered on a specialized incense altar in the time when the Tabernacle was located in the First and Second Temples. It is mentioned in the Book of Exodus 30:34.

Frankincense also received numerous mentions in the New Testament (Luke 1:10 ; Revelation 5:8, 8:3). Together with gold and myrrh, it was made an offering to the infant Jesus (Matthew 2:11). Frankincense is a symbol of holiness and righteousness. The gift of frankincense to the Christ child was symbolic of His willingness to become a sacrifice, wholly giving Himself up, analogous to a burnt offering.

Frankincense was reintroduced to Europe by Frankish Crusaders, although its name refers to its quality, not to the Franks themselves. Although it is better known as “frankincense” to westerners, the resin is also known as olibanum, or in Arabic, al-lubān (roughly translated: “that which results from milking”), a reference to the milky sap tapped from the Boswellia tree.

Advertisement

The Greek historian Herodotus was familiar with frankincense and knew it was harvested from trees in southern Arabia. He reported that the gum was dangerous to harvest because of venomous snakes that lived in the trees. He goes on to describe the method used by the Arabs to get around this problem, that being the burning of the gum of the styrax tree whose smoke would drive the snakes away. The resin is also mentioned by Theophrastus and by Pliny the Elder in his Naturalis Historia.

Frankincense is used in many Christian churches including the Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox and Catholic churches. According to the Biblical text of Matthew 2:11, gold, frankincense, and myrrh were among the gifts to Jesus by the biblical magi “from out of the East.” Christian and Islamic Abrahamic faiths have all used frankincense mixed with oils to anoint newborn infants, initiates and members entering into new phases of their spiritual lives.

Conversely, the spread of Christianity depressed the market for frankincense during the 4th century AD. Desertification made the caravan routes across the Rub’ al Khali or “Empty Quarter” of the Arabian Peninsula more difficult. Additionally, increased raiding by the Parthians in the Near East caused the frankincense trade to dry up after A.D. 300.

Frankincense Oil DIY Recipes

Scar Reducing Body Butter: Total Time: 5 minutes; Serves: 4

INGREDIENTS:

Advertisement

  • 2 ounces shea butter or coconut oil
  • 10 drops of jasmine oil
  • 10 drops frankincense oil
  • Small container or jar to mix the ingredients

DIRECTIONS:

In a double boiler, melt the shea butter until it’s liquid.

Make sure the oil is not so hot that it will burn you, then add the other oils and stir together to combine. Having the shea butter be room temperature or a little warmer is best.

You can either smear it on your scar right away, or if you’d like to make it into a shelf-stable cream texture, place the mixture in the fridge until it’s cool for a few minutes, then use a hand mixer on high speed to whip the oils into a white cream.

Pour into a glass jar or containers, and keep it at room temperature to use whenever you want.

Sleep-Inducing Facial Cream or Body Rub: Total Time: 5 minutes; Serves: 1

Advertisement

This all-natural night cream is great to help you fall asleep. It also doubles as a skin health-booster if you apply it to your face and may be able to help clear up blemishes or breakouts.

INGREDIENTS:

  • 5 drops frankincense essential oil
  • 5 drops lavender essential oil
  • 1/4 tablespoon organic coconut oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon olive oil
  • Small container or jar to mix the ingredients

DIRECTIONS:

Use coconut oil that’s not solid but rather soft. If need be, heat it first in a double broiler.

Add the other oils and stir together to combine. Spread over your face and body. You may want to pat yourself off after to not allow the oil to seep into your bed sheets. You can also store this to use at another time.

Homemade Frankincense and Myrrh Lotion: Total Time: 90 minutes; Serves: 30

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1/4 cup coconut oil
  • 1/4 cup bees wax
  • 1/4 cup shea butter
  • 2 tbsp vitamin E
  • 20 drops frankincense essential oil
  • 20 drops myrrh essential oil
  • BPA free plastic lotion dispenser bottles

Directions:

Put olive oil, coconut oil, beeswax and shea butter in glass bowl then place that bowl in sauce pan with water.

Heat stove to medium and mix ingredients together.

Once mixed put in refrigerator for an hour until solid.

With a regular mixer or hand mixer beat the mixture until it is whipped and fluffy. Then add essential oils and vitamin E and mix.

Fill container and store in cool place.

Homemade Frankincense Soap Bar: Total Time: 30 minutes; Serves: 30

INGREDIENTS:

  • 20-30 drops frankincense essential oil
  • Soap Base
  • 5 drops pomegranate oil
  • Oval Bar Molds or Decorative Soap Mold

Directions:

Put soap base in glass bowl then place that bowl in sauce pan with water.

Heat stove to medium and allow base to melt.

Remove from heat and let cool slightly. Then add the frankincense and pomegranate oil

Mix well and transfer to a soap mold

Let mixture cool fully before popping bar out of mold. Keep at room temp

Frankincense Interactions/Side Effects

For oil safety concerns, you should know that frankincense essential oil is extremely well-tolerated, especially compared to prescription medications. To date, there are no reported serious side effects of using frankincense oil, as long as you do not ingest large quantities, which can result in it becoming toxic.

Rarely frankincense oil can cause certain reactions for some people, including minor skin rashes and digestive problems like nausea or stomach pains. Frankincense is also known to have blood-thinning effects, so anyone who has problems related to blood clotting should not use frankincense oil or should speak with a doctor first. Otherwise, the oil may have potential to negatively react with certain anticoagulant medications.

References:

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frankincense
  2. https://draxe.com/what-is-frankincense/
  3. http://deposit.ddb.de/cgi-bin/dokserv?idn=975255932&dok_var=d1&dok_ext=pdf&filename=975255932.pdf
  4. http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=frankincense
  5. https://finance.yahoo.com/news/worlds-last-wild-frankincense-forests-084122152.html
  6. http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2011/12/21/christmas-staple-frankincense-doomed-ecologists-warn/
  7. http://www.bibler.org/glossary/frankincense.html
  8. https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/essential-oils/health-benefits-of-frankincense-essential-oil.html
  9. https://www.mountainroseherbs.com/products/frankincense-essential-oil/profile
  10. https://draxe.com/frankincense-oil-cancer/
  11. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/314366.php
  12. https://drericz.com/frankincense-oil-benefits/
  13. https://www.healthline.com/health/cancer/frankincense-and-cancer
  14. http://tisserandinstitute.org/frankincense-oil-and-cancer-in-perspective/
  15. http://roberttisserand.com/2015/03/frankincense-essential-oil-and-cancer/
  16. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2664784/
  17. https://breastcancerconqueror.com/the-power-of-essential-oils-on-breast-cancer/
  18. https://beatcancer.org/blog-posts/the-cancer-healing-power-of-frankincense
  19. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3796379/
  20. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/?term=frankincense%20and%20cancer&page=2
  21. http://www.i-detox.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/Frankincense-Essential-Oil-for-treating-Cancer-v2-summary-notes-from-Dr-Lin_s-talks-in-SG-2013.pdf
  22. https://www.mskcc.org/cancer-care/integrative-medicine/herbs/boswellia
  23. https://www.nhs.uk/news/cancer/can-frankincense-really-fight-cancer/
  24. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2221169115001446
  25. http://www.acanceresearch.com/cancer-research/frankincense-boswellia-species-the-novel-phytotherapy-for-drug-targeting-in-cancer.php?aid=8424
  26. https://www.livestrong.com/article/479493-frankincense-cancer/
  27. https://www.canceractive.com/cancer-active-page-link.aspx?n=3658
  28. https://peoplebeatingcancer.org/frankincense-oil-causes-apoptosis-to-bladder-cancer-cells/
  29. https://www.curejoy.com/content/holy-herbs-frankincense-and-myrrh-can-cure-cancer/
  30. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/8505251.stm
  31. https://wellnessmama.com/123712/frankincense-oil-uses-benefits/

Color In Marketing

How Color is Used in Marketing

Color psychology is one of the more fascinating sides of marketing. Reds to motivate. Blues to build trust. Oranges for confidence. The visual light spectrum has the power to play our emotional responses like a violin. Color has profound psychological effect on human emotion and thought, behavior and decisions. Colors exercise powerful effects and induce reactions based on both instincts and associations.

Colors alter the meanings of the objects or situations with which they are associated, and color preferences can predict consumers’ behavior. This is why corporations began researching how to use color to get you to spend more. Sometimes color is the sole reason you bought something, and you didn’t even know it. Color directs what you see and how you react.

Advertisement

  • Contrasting colors are used help to reduce eye strain and assist you in focusing on specific items.
  • The vibrancy of a color can dictate your emotional response.
  • Brighter colors cause you to feel more energetic. They promote physical activity and make it seem that time passes slower.
  • Darker colors make it easier for you to process data.
  • Cooler and softer colors are better for mental activity and make time seem to fly by.
  • Monochromatic (single color) color schemes are easy on the eye and provide a sleek and minimalistic look.
  • Complementary color schemes use two colors from opposite ends of color wheel to provide a pleasing view.
  • Triple color scheme uses three colors equally spaced on the color wheel to provide a harmonious effect on the web page.
  • Pure colors are those without the addition of white, black, or a third color. These are intense, bright, and cheery.
  • Tints are made when you add white to a color, also known as pastel colors, and they are lighter and paler than pure color.
  • Shades are made when black is added to a color. It darkens and dulls the brightness of pure colors.
  • Tones are made when grey is added to a pure color. This ‘tones down’ the intensity of color.
  • Analogous colors are found next to each other on the color wheel.
  • Triad (triangle) – color combination made of three colors evenly spaced on the color wheel.
  • Tetradic (rectangle) – color combination of four colors made up of two complementary pairs.
  • Square – four colors evenly spaced on color wheel.

How do Colors Influence People? (SmallBizTrends.com)

Primary Colors: Red, Blue, Yellow

Secondary Colors: Purple, Green, Orange

Tertiary Colors: red-purple, red-orange, yellow-green

Red – Creates a sense of urgency, which is good for clearance sales. Encourages appetite, thus is frequently used by fast-food chains. Physically stimulates the body, raising blood pressure and heart rate, associated with movement, excitement, and passion. Shows friendliness and strength along with aggressiveness and negative emotions.

Advertisement

Pink – Softer and less intense than red. Provides compassion an unconditional love. Soothing, caring, romantic, hopeful, understanding, and nurturing. Too much pink is draining and can show a lack of power or immaturity.

Blue – The preferred color of men. It’s associated with peace, water, tranquility, and reliability. Blue provides a sense of security, curbs appetite, and stimulates productivity. The most common color used by conservative brands looking to promote trust in their products. It is one of the last colors to be seen so can be perceived as distant, cold, or unfriendly.

Green – Associated with health, tranquility, power, and nature. Used in stores to relax customers and for promoting environmental issues. Green stimulates harmony in your brain and encourages a balance leading to decisiveness. Lends a clear sense of right and wrong but can be over-possessive and materialistic.

Purple – Commonly associated with royalty, wisdom, and respect. Stimulates problem solving as well as creativity. Frequently used to promote beauty and anti-aging products. Presents the opportunity for introspection and distraction as it causes thoughts to wander.

Orange & Yellow – Cheerful colors that promote optimism. Yellow can make babies cry, while orange can trigger a sense of caution. Used to create a sense of anxiety that can draw in impulsive buyers and window shoppers. Orange is the color of comfort and warmth, motivation, positive attitude, and general enthusiasm. Yellow is joyful, happy, cheerful, inspiring, and optimistic. Yet too much yellow makes us feel critical of ourselves and lowers our self-esteem.

Gold – represents charm, friendliness, abundance, prosperity, confidence, luxury, and treasure. Too much can be egotistical, proud, and self-righteous.

Brown – not visually stimulating but provides structure, stability, support, security, and protection. May seem too reserved, scheduled, or boring. Can be used in place of black when it might be too intense.

Advertisement

Black – Associated with sophistication, seriousness, control, independence, authority, power, stability, and strength. Can also show mystery, evil, and death. Often a symbol of intelligence but can become overwhelming or cause sadness if used too frequently.

Grey – Symbolizes feelings of practicality, old age, and solidarity. But too much grey can lead to feelings of nothingness and depression.

White – Associated with feelings of purity, cleanliness, peace, innocence, and safety. Represents new beginnings and provides a blank slate. Can be used to project an absence of color or neutrality. White space helps spark creativity since it can be perceived as an unaltered, clean state. Too much white can lead to isolation, loneliness, and emptiness.

https://coschedule.com/blog/color-psychology-marketing/
https://thelogocompany.net/blog/infographics/psychology-color-logo-design/
https://www.ravepubs.com/using-color-psychology-design-digital-signage-messages/

Color & Word Association (CoSchedule.com)

  • Trust: Most chose the color blue (34%), followed by white (21%) and green (11%)
  • Security: Blue came out on top (28%), followed by black (16%) and green (12%)
  • Speed: Red was overwhelmingly the favorite (76%)
  • Cheapness: Orange came first (26%), followed by yellow (22%) and brown (13%)
  • High Quality: Black was the clear winner (43%), then blue (20%)
  • High Tech: This was almost evenly split, with black the top choice (26%) and blue and gray second (both 23%)
  • Reliability: Blue was the top choice (43%), followed by black (24%)
  • Courage: Most chose purple (29%), then red (28%), and finally blue (22%)
  • Fear/Terror: Red came in first (41%) followed by black (38%)
  • Fun: Orange was the top choice (28%), followed closely by yellow (26%) and then purple (17%)

Color Association by Gender (CoSchedule.com)

  • Blue is the favored color by both men (57%) and women (35%), though it is more heavily favored by men.
  • Men dislike brown the most while women dislike orange the most.
  • Colors that were disliked were also seen as “cheap.”
  • Men tolerate achromatic colors (i.e. shades of gray) better.
  • Women preferred tints while men preferred pure or shaded colors.
  • A majority of men (56%) and women (76%) preferred cool colors in general.
  • Orange and yellow grow increasingly disliked as both genders get older.

References:

  1. https://smallbiztrends.com/2014/06/psychology-of-colors.html
  2. https://coschedule.com/blog/color-psychology-marketing/
  3. http://www.empower-yourself-with-color-psychology.com/color-and-marketing.html
  4. https://marketinginsidergroup.com/content-marketing/8-creative-examples-use-color-psychology-marketing/
  5. https://www.designbold.com/blog/2631-2/
  6. https://www.fastcodesign.com/90149703/the-big-money-behind-naming-a-color-of-the-year
  7. https://www.fastcompany.com/3009317/why-is-facebook-blue-the-science-behind-colors-in-marketing
  8. http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0258042X1103600206
  9. http://ijbssnet.com/journals/Vol_6_No_3_March_2015/4.pdf
  10. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/pts.2061
  11. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13527260500247827?src=recsys&journalCode=rjmc20
  12. https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/Impact-of-color-on-marketing-Singh/3c33ea02ea7ad48475eab0c8376195768f317972
  13. https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/pjap.2014.12.issue-2/pjap-2015-0006/pjap-2015-0006.xml
  14. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3743993/
  15. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4383146/
  16. https://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?referer=https://www.google.com/&httpsredir=1&article=1332&context=honorstheses
  17. http://www.pnas.org/content/107/19/8877

Feverfew

CC BY 2.5, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=216947

Feverfew leaf (Tanacetum parthenium)

Feverfew is a flowering plant in the daisy family Asteraceae. It is a traditional medicinal herb which is commonly used to prevent migraine headaches and is also occasionally grown for ornament. It is also commonly seen in the literature by its synonyms, Chrysanthemum parthenium and Pyrethrum parthenium. It is also sometimes referred to as bachelor’s buttons or feverfew.

The name stems from the Latin word febrifugia, “fever reducer.” The first-century Greek physician Dioscorides prescribed feverfew for “all hot inflammations.” The ancient Greeks called the herb “Parthenium,” supposedly because it was used medicinally to save the life of someone who had fallen from the Parthenon during its construction in the 5th century BC. The first-century Greek physician Dioscorides used feverfew as an antipyretic. Feverfew also was known as “medieval aspirin” or the “aspirin” of the 18th century.

Advertisement

Common names: Chrysanthemum parthenium , Feverfew, featherfew, altamisa, bachelor’s button, featherfoil, febrifuge plant, midsummer daisy, nosebleed, Santa Maria, wild chamomile, wild quinine, chamomile grande, chrysanthemum atricaire, federfoy, flirtwort, Leucanthemum parthenium, Matricaria capensis, Matricaria eximia hort, Matricaria parthenium L., MIG-99, mother herb, Parthenium hysterophorus, parthenolide, Pyrenthrum parthenium L, European feverfew, feather-fully, feddygen fenyw, flirtroot, grande chamomile, mutterkraut, and vetter-voo.

Feverfew is native to Eurasia, specifically the Balkan Peninsula, Anatolia and the Caucasus, but cultivation has spread it around the world and it is now also found in the rest of Europe, North America and Chile.

Uses: The plant has been used to treat arthritis, asthma, constipation, dermatitis, earache, fever, headache, inflammatory conditions, insect bites, labor, menstrual disorders, potential miscarriage, psoriasis, spasms, stomach ache, swelling, tinnitus, toothache, vertigo, and worms. Feverfew also has been used as an abortifacient, as an insecticide, and for treating coughs and colds. Traditionally, the herb has been used as an antipyretic, from which its common name is derived.

History: In Central and South America, the plant has been used to treat a variety of disorders. The Kallaway Indians of the Andes mountains value its use for treating colic, kidney pain, morning sickness, and stomach ache. Costa Ricans use a decoction of the herb to aid digestion, as a cardiotonic, an emmenagogue, and as an enema for worms. In Mexico, it is used as an antispasmodic and as a tonic to regulate menstruation. In Venezuela, it is used for treating earaches.

Advertisement

The leaves are ingested fresh or dried, with a typical daily dose of 2–3 leaves. The bitterness is often sweetened before ingestion. Feverfew also has been planted around houses to purify the air because of its strong, lasting odor, and a tincture of its blossoms is used as an insect repellant and balm for bites. It has been used as an antidote for overindulgence in opium.

Properties: It has multiple pharmacologic properties, such as anticancer, anti-inflammatory, cardiotonic, antispasmodic, an emmenagogue, and as an enema for worms.

The plant contains a large number of natural products, but the active principles probably include one or more of the sesquiterpene lactones known to be present, including parthenolide. Other potentially active constituents include flavonoid glycosides and pinenes. There has been some scientific interest in parthenolide, which has been shown to induce apoptosis in some cancer cell lines in vitro and potentially to target cancer stem cells.

Health Benefits of Feverfew (Organicfacts.net)

Migraines: It is one of the few herbs with substantial scientific evidence for its efficacy in migraine prophylaxis. Most RCTs and surveys of individuals using feverfew for migraine prevention have documented beneficial results. Not only has feverfew demonstrated a reduction in migraine frequency and pain intensity, but also a profound reduction has been observed in typical accompanying symptoms, including vomiting, nausea, photophobia, and phonophobia.

Anxiety and Stress: Although the pathway for this particular benefit is not fully understood, feverfew has been known to reduce stress and alleviate anxiety in some users. This is very important for those who suffer from chronic stress, as the presence of stress hormones in the body can be dangerous over long periods.

Lower Inflammation: Some of the volatile compounds in feverfew have anti-inflammatory abilities, which effectively reduces inflammation throughout the body. For those who suffer from chronic joint pain, arthritis, gout, and other inflammatory conditions, herbal treatment with feverfew is a painless and effective solution.

Pain Reduction: This is closely related to the anti-inflammatory effects of feverfew, but any analgesic substance deserves some recognition. For thousands of years, feverfew has been used to prevent pain throughout the body, not just the pain of headaches and migraines. Following surgery or an injury, it can be successfully utilized for rapid and long-lasting relief.

Advertisement

Fever Symptoms: Traditionally, feverfew has been used to break and eliminate fevers. The name of the plant should be some indication of this ability. If you are suffering from a fever, whether it is linked to another more serious illness or not, it can help to promote sweating and eliminate toxins from the body, speeding the healing process and reducing inflammation.

Menstrual Discomfort: One of the popular uses of feverfew is in the reduction of discomfort during menstruation. For billions of women around the world, menstruation can be a painful monthly occurrence that includes cramps, bloating, hormonal swings, pain, and excessive bleeding. It can effectively lower inflammation, eliminate cramps, and induce calm to reduce mood swings and anxiety.

Appetite Booster: For people trying to gain weight or recovering from an injury/surgery, increasing one’s appetite can be very important. Feverfew has been linked to certain hormonal activity that induces hunger. While this may not be ideal for people trying to stay on a diet, it can certainly help the healing process and weight gain efforts for those individuals who may be underweight or calorie-deficient.

Respiratory Function: The soothing ability of feverfew also extends to the respiratory tract, where this herb is able to reduce inflammation and irritation, which can often exacerbate conditions like asthma or coughing. By allowing the respiratory tracts to relax, it can help soothe these symptoms and improve overall respiratory health.

Skin Guard: One of the more recent health benefits of feverfew is its role in skin health. Research is ongoing on the full effects of feverfew on the skin, but when it comes to dermatitis and other common forms of irritation, it has been shown to improve symptoms when topically applied.

Advertisement

Heart Health: Feverfew can inhibit the production of certain prostaglandins in the body that are responsible for increasing blood pressure. By reducing symptoms of hypertension, feverfew can protect overall heart health and lower the chances of experiencing atherosclerosis, and the consequent heart attacks and strokes linked to that particular blockage of the cardiovascular system.

How to Take: Recommended dosage, active amounts, other details

The standard adult dose for feverfew supplementation is 100-300 mg of a feverfew supplement containing 0.2%-0.4% parthenolide, taken one to four times a day.

Children younger than two should not be given feverfew. The standard feverfew dose for children is based off of a standard adult weight of 150 lbs. For example, if a child weighs 50lbs, the dose is one-third of the adult dose.

Liquid and tincture feverfew supplements are sometimes used to alleviate arthritis. The suggested dose is 60 – 120 drops of 1:1 (fluid) supplement or a 1:5 (tincture) supplement, taken twice a day.

Essential Oil of the Root of Tanacetum parthenium: The roots and rhizomes of Tanacetum parthenium (L.) Schulz. Bip. (Asteraceae), have been used in Iranian traditional medicine under the name of Aqhovan, as digestive and stomachic tonic. Composition of the essential oil, which was obtained from the root of T. parthenium collected from Karaj, was determined by gas chromatography, combined GC/MS and GC/IR. In total, 20 components (92% of essential oil) were identified. Major constituents were camphor (30.2%), (Z)- chrysanthenyl acetate (26.5%), α-farnesene (11.1%) and spathulenol (8.2%).

Advertisement

Common side effects: oral ulcers and tongue soreness if dried leaves are chewed. It can cause increased heart rates, dizziness, anxiety, sleeplessness, abdominal pain, bloating, nausea, and diarrhea.

Long-term use of feverfew followed by abrupt discontinuation may induce a withdrawal syndrome featuring rebound headaches and muscle and joint pains. Feverfew can cause allergic reactions, including contact dermatitis.

Other side effects have included gastrointestinal upset such as nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and flatulence. When the herb is chewed or taken orally it can cause mouth ulcers and swelling and numbness of the mouth. Feverfew should not be taken by pregnant women. It may interact with blood thinners and increase the risk of bleeding and may also interact with a variety of medications metabolized by the liver.

References:

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tanacetum_parthenium
  2. http://nccih.nih.gov/health/feverfew
  3. https://www.organicfacts.net/feverfew.html
  4. https://examine.com/supplements/feverfew/
  5. https://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/f/feverf10.html
  6. https://doi.org/10.1002%2F14651858.CD002286.pub2
  7. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Center_for_Complementary_and_Integrative_Health
  8. https://migraine.com/migraine-treatment/natural-remedies/feverfew/
  9. http://www.meschinohealth.com/books/feverfew
  10. http://bloodjournal.hematologylibrary.org/content/105/11/4163.long
  11. http://www.pharmacists.ca/content/CPJPDFS/Jan04/parthenolide.pdf
  12. http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/feverfew-000243.htm
  13. http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0890-6238(06)00102-X
  14. http://www.agriculture.gov.sk.ca/Default.aspx?DN=5a05a8da-ff3e-490b-b280-35f7b22b803b
  15. https://www.jstor.org/stable/29520398
  16. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3210009/
  17. https://www.medicinenet.com/feverfew_tanacetum_parthenium-oral/article.htm
  18. https://www.medicinenet.com/feverfew_tanacetum_parthenium-oral/article.htm#which_drugs_or_supplements_interact_with_feverfew_tanacetum_parthenium-oral
  19. https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/tanacetum-parthenium
  20. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/(SICI)1099-1573(199711)11:7%3C508::AID-PTR153%3E3.0.CO;2-H/abstract
  21. http://www.ema.europa.eu/docs/en_GB/document_library/Herbal_-_HMPC_assessment_report/2011/06/WC500107719.pdf
  22. http://ijpr.sbmu.ac.ir/article_735.html
  23. https://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-933-feverfew.aspx?activeingredientid=933&activeingredientname=feverfew
  24. Duke JA. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press; 1985. CRC Handbook of Medicinal Herbs.

Fennel

Fennel seeds, bulb, stalk, and leaves. Brian Hagiwara/Getty Images

Fennel seed & oil (Foeniculum vulgare)

Common Names: Large fennel, sweet fennel, wild fennel, sweet cumin, finnochio, fänkål (Swedish), hinojo (Spanish), Fenchel (German), fennikel (Danish), hui-hsiang (Chinese), fenouil (French), fennika (Icelandic).

Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) comes from either a perennial or biennial herb with yellow flowers in the Apiaceae (Umbelliferae) family. It is a hardy, perennial herb with yellow flowers and feathery leaves. It is indigenous to the shores of the Mediterranean but has become widely naturalized in many parts of the world, especially on dry soils near the sea-coast and on riverbanks.

Advertisement

You will find Fennel Seeds in Mother Jai’s Heartburn Relief Tea

There are two variations: bitter/common (F. vulgare var. amara) and sweet (F. vulgare var. dulce). Bitter fennel oil should be avoided in aromatherapy and home use. Sweet fennel smells like anise with a hint of earth and spicy pepper.

Fennel is a member of the carrot and parsley family. It can grow to five feet tall and has delicate, lacy leaves. Sweet fennel oil is produced in places like Bulgaria, France, Germany, and Japan.

It is a highly aromatic and flavorful herb with culinary and medicinal uses and, along with the similar-tasting anise, is one of the primary ingredients of absinthe. Florence fennel or finocchio is a selection with a swollen, bulb-like stem base that is used as a vegetable.

Advertisement

Fennel has several subspecies and varieties including:

  • Foeniculum vulgare Mill. subsp. vulgare var. dulce (Mill.) Batt. (Sweet fennel)
  • Foeniculum vulgare Mill. subsp. piperitum (Ucria) Cout. (Bitter fennel)
  • Foeniculum vulgare Mill. subsp. vulgare var. azoricum (Mill.) Thell.
  • Foeniculum vulgare Mill. subsp. vulgare var. vulgare (Sweet fennel)

Historical Uses

Fennel is considered one of the oldest medicinal plants and culinary herbs. It is fairly certain that fennel was in use over 4000 years ago. It is mentioned in the famous Ebers Papyrus, an ancient Egyptian collection of medical writings made around 1500 BC. There it is referred to principally as a remedy for flatulence.

The name foeniculum is from the Latin word for “fragrant hay.” Fennel was in great demand during the Middle Ages.

Wealthy people added the seed to fish and vegetable dishes, while the poor reserved it as an appetite suppressant to be eaten on fasting days.

The plant was introduced to North America by Spanish priests and the English brought it to their early settlements in Virginia. Fennel has been used to flavor candies, liqueurs, medicines, and food, and it is especially favored for pastries, sweet pickles, and fish.

Fennel was used by the ancient Egyptians as a food and medicine and was considered a snake bite remedy in ancient China.

During the Middle ages fennel was hung over doorways to drive away evil spirits. (Herb Society of America) Fennel has been used since ancient times to treat menstrual disorders, dyspepsia, flatulence and cough, and to reduce the griping effect of laxatives.

Advertisement

Fennel fruits have been used as TCM for the treatment of infants suffering from dyspeptic disorders in China for centuries. It was also recommended for bronchitis, chronic coughs, kidney stones, dysmenorrhea, vomiting, and diarrhea.

The ancients believed eating the fennel herb and seeds imparted courage, strength, and conveyed longevity. In Imperial Roman times the physicians were in high regard of fennel for medicinal purposes.

The ancient Greeks and Anglo-Saxons snitched on their fast days by nibbling a little fennel, which reduced the appetite. The ancients believed that myopic reptiles ate fennel to improve their vision and so used it themselves for this purpose. It is still prescribed as an eye-wash. Also, for failing eyesight, a tea was made from fennel leaves to be used as a compress on swollen eyes.

As Old English finule, fennel is one of the nine plants invoked in the pagan Anglo-Saxon Nine Herbs Charm, recorded in the 10th century.

In the 15th century, Portuguese settlers on Madeira noticed the abundance of wild fennel, and used the Portuguese word funcho (fennel) and the suffix -al to form the name of a new town, Funchal

Advertisement

Longfellow’s 1842 poem “The Goblet of Life” repeatedly refers to the plant and mentions its purported ability to strengthen eyesight:

Above the lower plants it towers,

The Fennel with its yellow flowers;

And in an earlier age than ours

Was gifted with the wondrous powers

Lost vision to restore.

Advertisement

Known Hazards of Fennel

Skin contact with the sap or essential oil is said to cause photo-sensitivity and/or dermatitis in some people. Ingestion of the oil can cause vomiting, seizures and pulmonary edema.

Epileptics, people with cancer or on multiple medications, and anyone pregnant or trying to be shouldn’t use fennel.

Those who are allergic to celery, carrot, mugwort, or other plants in the Apiaceae family may have a reaction to the herb and its oils.

Fennel might slow blood clotting. Taking fennel might increase the risk of bleeding or bruising in people with bleeding disorders.

Hormone-sensitive condition such as breast cancer, uterine cancer, ovarian cancer, endometriosis, or uterine fibroids: Fennel might act like estrogen. If you have any condition that might be made worse by exposure to estrogen, do not use fennel.

Keep in mind that fennel interacts negatively with multiple medications including Cipro and may decrease the effects of birth control. If you are taking any prescribed drugs, confer with a physician before using any form of fennel.

Cautions and Contraindications: avoid use of oil in liver disease, alcoholism, while breast feeding, or during the use of acetaminophen; pregnancy due to emmenagogue action (empirical), essential oil use with infants or small children under 2 y.o.a. (speculative), prolonged use (speculative), acid reflux (speculative)

Constituents of Fennel

Fennel oil contains 50-60 percent of the licorice-tasting terpenoid anethole, the same active constituent found in anise. Anethole is thirteen times sweeter than sugar and is widely used as a flavoring agent in many things including liqueurs like Ouzo, Absinthe, and Pernod.

The main chemical components of fennel oil are a-pinene, myrcene, fenchone, trans-anethole, methyl chavicol, limonene, 1,8-cineole and anisic aldehyde.

Blending Fennel

Fennel blends well with other seed oils like cardamom and caraway, spicy oils like black pepper and ginger, and citrus oils, as well as geranium, lavender, rose, and sandalwood.

Therapeutic Uses

The dried seeds are steamed distilled to produce a thin yellow liquid that is good for a variety of therapeutic uses. This oil is helpful for conditions like gastrointestinal disorders and menstrual issues. It is detoxifying and can be used for weight loss and to reduce fluid retention and cellulite.

The plant is analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, aromatic, carminative, diuretic, emmenagogue, expectorant, galactogogue, hallucinogenic, laxative, stimulant and stomachic.

An infusion is used in the treatment of indigestion, abdominal distension, stomach pains etc. It helps in the treatment of kidney stones and, when combined with a urinary disinfectant like Arctostaphylos uva-ursi, makes an effective treatment for cystitis.

It can also be used as a gargle for sore throats and as an eyewash for sore eyes and conjunctivitis. Fennel is often added to purgatives in order to allay their tendency to cause gripe, and also to improve the flavour.

For the mind, it adds courage and strength in the face of adversity. It has a cleansing and toning effect on the skin, helping with bruises, sorting out overly oily skin and to fight wrinkles in more mature complexions (possibly due to the estrogenic properties of the oil).

The essential oil of fennel contains several bioreactive secondary metabolites, such as aldehydes. The oil apparently affects the stability of biomembranes and interacts with molecular targets, such as proteins and DNA, which causes a low cytotoxicity.

It has a toning effect on the spleen and liver, that helps with the results of excess drink and food. Hepatoprotective properties.

It is also used for increasing insufficient milk in nursing mothers – but for boosting breast milk, rather use the fresh herb, since the oil contains very high concentrations of trans-anethole.

An infusion of the seeds is a safe and effective cure for wind in babies.

An infusion of the root is used to treat urinary disorders.

An essential oil obtained from the seed is used in aromatherapy. Its keyword is “Normalising”. The essential oil is bactericidal, carminative and stimulant.

Benefits of Fennel

Rich in phytoestrogens, Fennel is often used for colic, wind, irritable bowel, kidneys, spleen, liver, lungs, suppressing appetite, breast enlargement, promoting menstruation, improving digestive system, milk flow and increasing urine flow. Fennel is also commonly used to treat amenhorrea, angina, asthma, anxiety, depression, heartburn, water retention, lower blood pressure, boost libido, respiratory congestion, coughs and has been indicated for high blood pressure and to boost sexual desire. Fennel offers us the opportunity to release toxins, increase energy, release self-limiting beliefs, and support our ability to ‘digest’ and ‘transform’ food/experiences/thoughts in a healthy way.

Increases Confidence: If you have a problem being assertive, fennel can help break you out of it. Add a drop of fennel to a cotton ball to sniff throughout the day. Changes will not happen overnight, but with repeated use, you may find your confidence increasing. Alternatively, you could blend fennel with other ‘meek-busting’ oils like jasmine, ginger, patchouli, bergamot, carnation, or lime. Find a mix you enjoy, and add a drop of that to a cotton ball.

Calms Digestive Disorders: Fennel has long been used for digestive complaints. A fennel massage using four drops of the essential oil in a tablespoon of a carrier can be made to help with diarrhea, constipation, or painful bloating. Rub this into the abdomen three times a day until symptoms subside. If you have fluid buildup elsewhere in the body, then simply rub the oil there instead of the abdomen.

If nausea is the issue, add this blend to a pint of hot distilled water. Mix as well as possible, then soak a small towel in it to make a compress and lay it over the stomach. Alternatively, you can rub the blend on first and then put a hot towel over instead of using the oil water.

Fennel seeds, particularly in powdered form, can act as a laxative. The roughage helps clear the bowels, whereas its stimulating effect helps maintain the proper peristaltic motion of the intestines, thereby helping promote proper excretion through the stimulation of gastric juices and bile production. Fennel is also commonly found in medicines that treat abdominal pain, diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and other intestinal issues.

Fennel is helpful in curing diarrhea if it is caused by bacterial infections because some components such as anethol and cineole have disinfectant and antibacterial properties. Some amino acids, such as histidine, can aid in digestion and the proper functioning of the digestive system, thereby helping to eliminate diarrhea due to indigestion. Fennel has long been used by indigenous cultures as a way to eliminate diarrhea.

Reduces Heart Disease: Fennel is a great source of fiber, as mentioned above, but besides the advantages to digestion that fiber provides, it also helps maintain healthy levels of cholesterol in the bloodstream. This means that it can stimulate the elimination damaging LDL or bad cholesterol, which is a major factor in heart diseases, atherosclerosis, and strokes.

Eases Menstrual Issues: Fennel is also an emmenagogue, meaning that it eases and regulates menstruation by properly regulating hormonal action in the body. Furthermore, fennel is used in a number of products to reduce the effects of PMS, and it is also used traditionally as a soothing pain reliever and relaxing agent for menopausal women.

Promotes Breast Enlargement: The flavonoids present in fennel seeds increase the amount of estrogen thereby acting as a stimulant and tonic. Fennel seeds help increase the size of the breasts as they increase the formation of new cells and tissues in the breast.

Helps Hangovers: Drinking too much alcohol can wreak havoc on the body. If you imbibed too much the night before, dropping 3-4 drops of fennel in your shower and breathing in the steam can help make you feel better.

Soothes Infant Colic: Besides calming gastrointestinal disorders in adults, fennel can be helpful for infants. ‘Gripe water’ is either dill, anise, or fennel water mixed with syrup and bicarbonate of soda that eases painful flatulence in infants.

Prohibits Growth/Causes Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells: In 2017, researchers found that the high anethole content present in fennel essential oil has an inhibitory effect on cancerous prostate cells. It stops proliferation of the cells and leads to apoptosis, or spontaneous death of the prostate cancer cell line (PC-3 cells). This study shows that anethole could be promising in the fight against the often-fatal prostate cancer.

Regulates Blood Pressure: Fennel is a very rich source of potassium, which is an essential nutrient in our bodies and is vital for a number of important processes. One of the attributes of potassium is its quality as a vasodilator, which means that it relaxes the tension of blood vessels, thereby reducing blood pressure. High blood pressure is connected to a wide range of health issues, including heart attack, stroke, and atherosclerosis. Also, for diabetics, blood pressure issues can make management of their insulin and glucose levels very difficult and can be the cause of many potentially lethal complications. A cup of fennel bulb in your daily diet will pump you full of potassium and all the benefits that come along with it.

Improves Brain Function: Potassium, found in high levels in fennel bulbs and seeds, is an electrolyte, which means that it facilitates increased electrical conduction throughout the body. This includes connections within the brain, which is a veritable switchboard of electric currents. Potassium can help increase brain function and cognitive abilities through this quality. Also, fennel is a vasodilator, which means more oxygen reaches the brain and neural activity can work at optimal functionality.

Eye Care: Using fennel in food helps protect the eyes from inflammation and also help reduce disorders related to premature aging and macular degeneration. This is due to the high abundance of antioxidants (vitamin C and amino acids like arginine are very beneficial for rejuvenation of tissues and the prevention of aging), detoxifiers and stimulants. They are more specifically found in fennel essential oil, as well as minerals like cobalt and magnesium. Finally, the juice of its leaves and the plant itself can be externally applied to the eyes to reduce irritation and eye fatigue.

Fennel is also a rich source of flavonoids, which are very useful in protecting against pigment cells dying due to oxidative-stress-induced death. By protecting against this destruction of the pigment cells, fennel can safely be classified as effective in eye health for numerous reasons.

Treats Respiratory Disorders: Fennel is useful in respiratory disorders such as congestion, bronchitis, and cough due to the presence of cineole and anethol, which are expectorant in nature, among their many other virtues. Fennel seeds and powder can help break up phlegm and prompt loosening of the toxins and buildup of the throat and nasal passages for elimination from the body to ensure quick recovery from respiratory conditions.

Other Benefits & Uses: Fennel is a diuretic, which means that it increases the amount and frequency of urination, thereby helping the removal of toxic substances from the body and helping in rheumatism and swelling. It also increases the production and secretion of milk in lactating mothers and since this milk contains some properties of fennel, it is an anti-flatulent for the baby as well. It strengthens hair, prevents hair loss, relaxes the body, sharpens memory, and has a marvelous cooling effect in summer. This can be achieved if the pale, greenish-yellow water, in which it is soaked, is ingested with a bit of sugar and black salt.

FENNEL TEA

Fennel tea is a delicious and popular variety of tea that happens to provide a number of health benefits, including its ability to lower blood pressure, protect the respiratory system, improve digestion, detoxify the body, and help with weight loss, among others.

Anti-spasmodic Effects: Calming the stomach and other organs can be an important first step in eliminating inflammation and stomach upset. The natural soothing effects of fennel tea can reduce spasms in the gut and other parts of the body, thereby reducing stress hormones and taking less of a toll on your overall system.

Improves Digestion: for thousands of years, fennel has been used as a digestive aid. The anti-inflammatory and carminative effects can prevent the formation of gas, thereby eliminating bloating and cramping, while also speeding up the digestive process and ensuring maximum nutrient uptake. Fennel can even help to rebuild damaged tissues and prevent further injury to the digestive tracts.

Boosts Immunity: This herb has powerful antibacterial, antiseptic, and antifungal effects, making it an excellent immune system booster. It is also well known to stave off cold and flu before they can fully manifest into an infection. Drinking fennel tea is, therefore, a preventative measure and a treatment to keep you on the right side of healthy!

Weight Loss: There are a number of ways in which fennel tea can help you lose weight. First of all, by promoting urination, it can eliminate water retention and bloating. Secondly, as a metabolism booster, it can help your body burn fat and calories faster, making your exercise efforts more rewarding. Finally, by regulating your appetite and hormones, it can prevent overeating and obesity.

Detoxifies the Body: One of the most important functions of urination is not only relieving that pressing feeling in your gut, but eliminating excess toxins extracted from the blood and kidneys. Fennel works as a blood cleanser and a diuretic, keeping your kidneys and liver healthy and working at full capacity.

Balances Hormone Levels: When it comes to protecting female reproductive health and wellness, few herbs are as important as fennel. The compounds found in fennel tea have estrogen-like qualities, meaning that they can alleviate many of the painful symptoms of menstruation, while also regulating hormones, increasing libido, and stimulating the production of breast milk in lactating mothers.

Reduces Inflammation: Those suffering from arthritis, gout and other inflammation issues have found relief from fennel tea for generations. By detoxifying the body, you also help your tissues and muscles function more normally and lower the chances of unnecessary inflammatory responses. This can help you get better sleep and have more energy to take on your daily tasks.

Protects the Eyes: Nothing shows a bad night of sleep like swollen or puffy eyes, but fennel tea can be an ideal solution for this. The rapid anti-inflammatory response of this tea can help your physical appearance, while the antibacterial and immune-boosting effects can further protect the eyes from other infection, such as conjunctivitis.

Lowers Blood Pressure: The impact that fennel tea can have on the heart is largely based on its mineral content, namely the potassium found in this herb. Potassium acts as a vasodilator, meaning that it can relieve the tension on arteries and blood vessels, thus making it more difficult for atherosclerosis to occur. This can help prevent coronary heart diseases, as well as lower your risk for heart attack and stroke.

Eliminates Bad Breath: Not only is fennel great for the digestion of a meal, but also to eliminate any traces of it on your breath. As mentioned above, the similarity of fennel to anise seed gives it a refreshing and cleansing effect on your breath, while also protecting your gums and teeth, due to its antifungal and antibacterial effects.

Relieves Respiratory Distress: When it comes to congestion of the respiratory system, fennel tea is an excellent solution, as it works as an expectorant, eliminating the phlegm and mucus where infectious pathogens can reside and multiple. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory effects help to relieve sore throats and sinus pressure, thus allowing you to breathe normally.

Word of Caution: Fennel tea is generally considered to be very good for overall health, so much so that it is often given to infants in order to calm them down and ward off colic. However, people who are allergic to carrots or celery should avoid fennel tea, due to the plant’s close relationship to those allergens. Furthermore, women suffering from breast cancer or undergoing treatment for such should not consume fennel unless they clear it with a doctor, as the estrogen-like effects can be a dangerous complication in the case of those conditions.

RECIPES

Weight Loss Bath Oil: Taking fennel herb supplements may help those that are trying to lose weight, and oil-lovers can benefit from the stimulating effects of fennel in the bath. Add five drops of the following blend to a teaspoon of carrier oil and mix into your bath water.

  • 8 drops Petitgrain (Citrus aurantium var. amara)
  • 4 drops Black pepper (Piper nigrum)
  • 4 drops Lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus)
  • 2 drop Coriander (Coriandrum sativum)
  • 1 drop Fennel, sweet (Foeniculum vulgare var. dulce)

Facial Steam: Fennel hydrolats are an excellent choice for brightening up normal, dull or oily complexions, and mature skin. Or, try a vapor steam by putting 3-5 drops in a bowl of steaming hot water. Place a towel on the back of the head and lean over the bowl until cool.

Hair Loss: Most people think of rosemary for hair loss. While that is an excellent choice, there are other oils that can be beneficial or this condition. Blend the following oils together and add two drops to a teaspoon of a carrier suitable for hair loss, such as avocado. Massage into hair nightly.

  • 10 drops Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis)
  • 10 drops Cedarwood Atlas (Cedrus atlantica)
  • 5 drops Clary Sage (Salvia sclarea)
  • 3 drops Sweet Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare var. dulce)
  • 2 drops Roman Chamomile (Anthemis nobilis)

Colic Soother: If you are dealing with a colicky baby, you can make a massage blend to help ease the symptoms. This combination, from Kurt Schnaubelt, can be utilized while making the dietary changes needed to solve the problem.

  • 3 drops Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare var. amara)
  • 3 drops German Chamomile (Matricaria recutica)
  • 3 drops Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)
  • 3 drops Cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum)
  • 3 drops Ginger (Zingiber officinale)

Gas Reliever: Infusion – 1-2 tsp/cup three times daily, or before meals

References:

  1. https://momprepares.com/essential-oils/fennel/
  2. https://www.aromaweb.com/essential-oils/fennel-oil.asp
  3. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fennel
  4. https://plants.usda.gov/core/profile?symbol=FOVU
  5. https://www.drugs.com/npc/fennel.html
  6. http://ageless.co.za/fennel.htm
  7. https://www.herbwisdom.com/herb-fennel.html
  8. https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/beverage/fennel-tea.html
  9. https://www.cabi.org/isc/datasheet/24271
  10. https://www.verywellfamily.com/foods-that-increase-breast-milk-supply-431598
  11. https://www.aromaweb.com/books/blossoming-heart-robbi-zeck.asp
  12. https://www.aromaweb.com/books/tissera2.asp
  13. https://aromaticstudies.com/fennel-foeniculum-vulgare/
  14. https://www.herbal-supplement-resource.com/fennel-herb.html
  15. https://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-311-fennel.aspx?activeingredientid=311&activeingredientname=fennel
  16. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23275017
  17. http://www.sbpmed.org.br/download/issn_06_4/8esp_193_198.pdf
  18. http://www.naturalmedicinalherbs.net/herbs/f/foeniculum-vulgare=fennel.php
  19. http://www.ndhealthfacts.org/wiki/Foeniculum_vulgare
  20. http://www.ndhealthfacts.org/wiki/55_Most_Common_Medicinal_Herbs:_The_Complete_Natural_Medicine_Guide
  21. http://www.ndhealthfacts.org/wiki/Principles_and_Practices_of_Naturopathic_Botanical_Medicine,_Advanced_Botanical_Medicine._V3
  22. http://www.ndhealthfacts.org/wiki/Herb,_Nutrient_and_Drug_Interactions:_Clinical_Implications_and_Therapeutic_Strategies
  23. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/225476912_Foeniculum_vulgare_A_comprehensive_review_of_its_traditional_use_phytochemistry_pharmacology_and_safety
  24. http://www.herbmedpharmacol.com/PDF/JHP-4-1.pdf
  25. https://www.rxlist.com/fennel-page3/supplements.htm#Interactions
  26. https://www.thebotanist.com/articles/the-loucheouzo-effect-and-anethole-video
  27. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1878535212000792
  28. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28745237
  29. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19143669
  30. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28426256
  31. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20334152
  32. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28846628
  33. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4202632/
  34. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0367326X03000285
  35. http://www.mdpi.com/2304-8158/6/9/73
  36. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4137549/
  37. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12722142
  38. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arabjc.2012.04.011
  39. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodcont.2013.06.056
  40. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.indcrop.2012.10.012
  41. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21285921
  42. http://dx.doi.org/10.2478/hepo-2013-0026
  43. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17709257
  44. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24617303
  45. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19075616
  46. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9292276
  47. http://dx.doi.org/10.4067/S0717-97072011000300008
  48. http://dx.doi.org/10.3329/bjb.v38i2.5144
  49. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15612826
  50. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25920239
  51. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2011.04.033
  52. http://dx.doi.org/10.4141/cjps77-120
  53. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodcont.2012.02.021
  54. http://dx.doi.org/10.1099/jmm.0.077768-0
  55. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0305-1978(96)00106-8
  56. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24751059
  57. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23933237
  58. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27721178
  59. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24156356
  60. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24767854
  61. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20008902
  62. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12868253

Eucalyptus

Eucalyptus leaf & oil (Eucalyptus globulus)

Eucalyptus globulus, the Tasmanian bluegum, southern blue-gum or blue gum, is an evergreen tree, one of the most widely cultivated trees native to Australia. They typically grow from 30–55 m (98–180 ft) tall. The tallest currently known specimen in Tasmania is 90.7 m (298 ft) tall. There are historical claims of even taller trees, the tallest being 101 m (331 ft). The natural distribution of the species includes Tasmania and southern Victoria (particularly the Otway Ranges and southern Gippsland). There are also isolated occurrences on King Island and Flinders Island in Bass Strait and on the summit of the You Yangs near Geelong. There are naturalised non-native occurrences in Spain and Portugal, and other parts of southern Europe incl. Cyprus, southern Africa, New Zealand, western United States (California), Hawaii, Macaronesia, and the Caucasus (Western Georgia).

Mother Jai blends a wonderful Cold & Flu Tea with eucalyptus globulus leaves.

Advertisement

Other Names: Blue Gum, Blue Mallee, Blue Mallee Oil, Eucalipto, Eucalypti Folium, Eucalyptol, Eucalyptol Oil, Eucalyptus blatter, Eucalyptus bicostata, Eucalyptus Essential Oil, Eucalyptus Oil, Eucalyptus fructicetorum, Eucalyptus globulus, Eucalyptus Leaf, Eucalyptus odorata, Eucalyptus Oil, Eucalyptus polybractea, Eucalyptus smithii, Fever Tree, Fieberbaumblatter, Gully Gum, Gully Gum Oil, Gum Tree, Huile Essentielle d’Eucalyptus, Huile d’Eucalyptol, Huile d’Eucalyptus, Red Gum, Stringy Bark Tree, Sugandhapatra, Tailapatra, Tasmanian Blue Gum.

Eucalyptus globulus

History of Eucalyptus

The first to use eucalyptus tea to bring down a fever were the aboriginal people of Australia. This plant was only introduced to the rest of the world in the 18th century by a botanist on the Cook voyages to the Australian continent.

Eucalyptus was quickly adopted by traditional Chinese and Ayurveda medicines and, in the 19th century, it began being planted in Europe. By the beginning of the 20th century large plantations of eucalyptus would be found in many countries.

The rapid growth of these trees helped not only to reforest vast areas of land but feed into the growing industries from pulpwood and charcoal to hygiene and cosmetics. In swamp areas the eucalyptus trees helped to drain the soil and reduce cases of malaria.

Advertisement

Uses for Eucalyptus Today

Eucalyptus leaves are still appreciated for their value in teas, inhalations and even for making cough candy. The nectar produced by lovely eucalyptus flowers is made into high quality honey.

As potpourris or stored inside a drawer, leaves are used to scent both clothes and home. You will find many products using eucalyptus oil for its refreshing and antiseptic properties, such as detergents, mouthwash, toothpaste and much more.

Eucalyptus radiata

BENEFITS OF EUCALYPTUS

The therapeutic benefits of Eucalyptus Globulus and Eucalyptus Radiata are quite similar. Both oils are high in 1,8- cineole, with varying monoterpenes. For example, Eucalyptus Globulus is high in 1,8- cineole, with significant amounts limonene, whereas Eucalyptus Radiata is high in 1,8- cineole with significant amounts of terpineol. These constituents lend our Eucalyptus oils to being excellent at supporting respiratory issues. The 1,8- cineole leads Eucalyptus oil to act as an astringent, and an aid to oily skin and acne.

Benefits of Eucalyptus Tea

Eucalyptus leaves are rich in limonene, which is antiviral, eucalyptol, and pinene, which is antiseptic. Apart from the volatile oils, this tea also contains flavonoids and tannins. These elements account for some of the main benefits of this herbal tea.

Treat Respiratory Problems: The most important of all eucalyptus tea benefits is its ability to help speed up the treatment of cold, flus and sore throats. Its antibacterial properties may help treat the cause of your respiratory ailments.

  • Taking this tea may also help to break a fever, bringing high body temperature down. You may even use eucalyptus leaves to create an air purifier, helping to clear the room of microbes.
  • As an expectorant, this tea may help by relieving irritation and disinfecting the respiratory tract. Eucalyptus herbal tea may help to expel phlegm and mucus that is causing chest congestion and making it difficult for you to breathe.
  • This herbal tea may treat all sorts of respiratory ailments such as laryngitis, bronchitis, emphysema and other infections. Gargling with it may even help to heal and calm a bad cough, treating an inflamed sore throat.
  • It also helps with other breathing problems such as allergies, asthma, rhinitis and sinusitis. You may even try using eucalyptus tea to try to reduce snoring. It is worth a try.

Blood Sugar Regulator: Drinking eucalyptus may help to lower blood sugar levels and stimulate the production of insulin. This may help prevent the onset of diabetes. If you already have diabetes then you should speak to your doctor before drinking this tea. A cup of this herbal tea may also improve blood circulation, relieving blood pressure and thus possibly preventing heart disease and other health problems.

Digestive Aid: Eucalyptus tea may be used to improve your digestion by clearing away any bacteria or parasites that may be causing you digestive problems. This herbal tea may be used as a cleansing agent, clearing your intestines of toxins and harmful agents.

Advertisement

It is a refreshing and cooling tea that may begin helping you the moment you take your first sip, as it helps to treat mouth infections, gum disease and even preventing cavities and plaque. It is a great remedy to try when you have mouth sores or just simply bad breath that could have been caused by bacteria.

Infection Fighter: Eucalyptus tea may be used to treat an illness, but it may also be used to prevent the occurrence of future ailments. A cup of this tea may help to give your immune system a boost reducing the chances of you getting sick.

  • Drink daily to help clear up acne, as this is a minor bacterial infection that may be fought using this antibacterial herbal tea. Eucalyptus is said to help detoxify the liver and cleanse the kidneys, resulting in healthier and fresher skin.
  • A cup of eucalyptus tea may be what you need when you have bladder or urinary problems. It is said to help not only treat bladder disease but also clear away infections in the urinary tract. This antiseptic tea may also help fight cystitis.
  • This herbal tea may be able to treat other infections, such as strep throat, E. coli, or yeast infections.

External Uses: Make a cooled eucalyptus infusion to use as a topical treatment for skin infections or inflammation. Use this herbal tea to clear away bacteria or microbes that are causing your problems.

  • As a compress this herbal infusion may be used to help scar wounds and begin the healing process. It may be used on cuts, burns and other wounds that you need help cleaning.
  • When applied topically this tea is also said to make your skin look healthier and feel fresher. You may resort to this tea when you need to get rid of lice or just simply repel insects.
  • You may find relief from muscle pains or joint stiffness by using a warm compress made with eucalyptus tea. This may also apply when the ache is caused by rheumatism or arthritis. The herbal infusion may clear away the inflammation and soothe the area.
  • Tip: Try soaking in a bath infused with eucalyptus tea when your body is aching.

Eucalyptus essential oil is well-loved in the field of aromatherapy. There are around 500 different species of eucalyptus essential oil produced around the world, but these four are the most commonly used:

Eucalyptus globulus: This species is the top choice for creating eucalyptus essential oil, and is the ingredient used for various eucalyptus products as well.

Advertisement

Eucalyptus polybractea: Also known as “Blue Mallee,” it is high in cineole, which is a colorless liquid terpene with an odor similar to camphor.

Eucalyptus radiata: Also known as “narrow-leaved peppermint,” it is known for its refreshing aroma.

Eucalyptus citriodora: Nicknamed the “lemon-scented gum,” it is primarily used in perfume and industrial purposes.

CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=129596

Benefits and Uses of Eucalyptus Essential Oil

Colds and Flu: Basically, Eucalyptus can cleanse the body of micro-organisms and harmful toxins that make you feel unwell. One of the best ways to use eucalyptus oil is to add the essential oil to a diffuser and leave this on all night. You sleep sound as the healing benefits of eucalyptus works its magic. If your cold/flu is more severe then add between 5 to 10 drops of eucalyptus essential oil to a bowl of boiling water, cover your head with a towel and inhale for 5 minutes. This should certainly clear your breathing.

Alleviating Pain: Eucalyptus essential oil has been scientifically proven to be particularly effective in alleviating pain, especially joint and muscle pain when topically applied. This is due to the beneficial herbal remedy’s potent compounds with incredibly powerful analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties. Topical application of eucalyptus oil on the affected area is recommended to offer an almost immediate relief for arthritis, stiff muscles, fibrosis, nerve pain, ache, rheumatism, sprained tendons and ligaments, and lumbago among other types of body pains. Massaging the potent eucalyptus oil on the affected area in a circular motion is considered to be an even more effective treatment strategy.

Repelling Insects: You can now easily do away with irritating pests and insects thanks to the natural herbal remedy’s distinct smell that drives them off. The natural remedy is a potent natural insect repellant that can be used to effectively scare harmful and irritating pests. You can either use the eucalyptus essential oil as a mist in a vaporizer or mix it with your favorite skin care cosmetic cream before topically applying it on your body. This essential oil is mostly used as an effective natural insect repellant by individuals who are allergic to pharmaceutical aerosol products created for the same purpose.

Advertisement

Promoting Good Dental Health: Eucalyptus essential oil is a common natural ingredient used in various toothpaste and mouthwash dental products. This is mainly because of the herbal remedies increasingly potent germicidal and antibacterial properties that are combined with its minty yet quite camphoraceous taste. Apart from playing a major role in improving oral breath, the eucalyptus natural herbal remedy can also be used to treat a wide variety of dental disorders, fight tooth decay, alleviate toothaches and treat both cavities and dental plaque. All these beneficial properties make the essential eucalyptus oil a must-go-to drug for various if not all dental-related issues.

Boosting the Immune System: Various scientific studies show that eucalyptus oil contains potent natural properties and compounds that can be used to enhance the immune system. For instance, when topically applied to the human skin, the essential oil can easily strengthen and stimulate immune cells, thus providing a super protective barrier against common infections.

Macrophages are unique types of body cells that whose main role is to fight and kill infections. Apart from that, the published scientific study also revealed that the natural herbal remedy actively helped the body to strengthen its protective mechanism (immune system) even further.

Treating Respiratory Issues: Eucalyptus essential oil has been scientifically proven to be quite effective in treating a wide range of respiratory issues, especially coughs and colds. The herbal remedy can also be used to offer relief against various sinusitis, asthma and bronchitis symptoms.

Eucalyptus leaves contain potent expectorant compounds that help in removing excess mucus and phlegm from the respiratory tract and sinuses thus actively eliminating thus threatening the existence of pathogens like bacteria that thrive in such environments. The natural herbal remedy’s vasodilating, soothing and anti-inflammatory properties are particularly effective for treating multiple asthma symptoms. All these eucalyptus benefits for breathing are crucial for maintaining a healthy respiratory system.

Alleviating Fever: The eucalyptus plant is often referred to as the “fever” tree due to its amazing ability to reduce body temperature and manage fever. A more effective natural herbal fever remedy can be produced by combining the eucalyptus essential oil with peppermint oil and then spraying it on the sick person’s body. You can also dilute the potent mixture with either water or olive oil when using it on a patient with a sensitive skin.

Diabetes Management: The natural herbal remedy can be used to manage and even prevent diabetes. There are various scientific studies that are still being carried out to explain the eucalyptus essential oil’s significant role in lowering blood sugar levels. Various research findings also indicate that the eucalyptus tree’s leaves can be brewed into a highly potent herbal tea that can be used to prevent and even treat diabetes. Drinking particularly one to two cups of the herbal infusion daily is highly recommended.

It is important to consult your doctor or licensed health practitioner before consuming the herbal remedy or any other natural remedy for that matter to manage your diabetes condition. This is because the essential oil’s blood sugar lowering effect might be dangerous depending on your current diabetes condition. Eucalyptus oil’s vasodilating properties can also lead to an increase in overall blood circulation, which is a major diabetes symptom.

Treating Anxiety, Stress, Depression, and Fatigue: This essential health benefit is attributed to the natural herbal remedy’s potent soothing and sedative effects. Eucalyptus tea is a natural remedy commonly recommended, especially for individuals suffering from chronic stress and anxiety. Apart from that, the herbal remedy’s vasodilation and stimulant properties help to relax blood vessels thus increasing blood flow.

By increasing blood flow to the brain, the herbal remedy actively rejuvenates the entire body system, thus; promoting active behavior. Mental exhaustion can also be alleviated by consuming the eucalyptus natural herbal remedy. You are likely to become slightly sluggish when suffering from any major or minor medical condition. However, you can solve this issue simply by consuming the natural herbal remedy.

Eucalyptus Benefits for Skin: According to the “University of Maryland Medical Centre,” the eucalyptus essential oil has been used to reduce inflammation, treat various skin infections and heal wounds for centuries now. Cineole, citronellal, and citronellol are the main compounds that provide the herbal remedy with its potent antibacterial compounds that are beneficial to the skin.

Eucalyptus oil also contains antiseptic and antimicrobial properties that are particularly effective for treating sores, wounds, burns, abrasions, scrapes and cuts. The herbal remedy can also be made into a healing ointment or salve for treating insect bites and stings.

Wound Treatment: Eucalyptus oil has antimicrobial and antiseptic properties that are effective at treating wounds, burns, cuts, abrasions, sores and scrapes. It also can be made into a salve or healing ointment and put on bug bites and stings. Along with acting as a natural pain reliever to the area, it also keeps the area from getting infected, which speeds healing.

Odor Remover: Whether you’re battling smelly shoes or a stinky dog bed, topically wash items to remove odors with a wet rag soaked in eucalyptus oil-infused water, and place outside to dry in the sun. This can prevent odors as well as keep the shape intact! You may also mix it with lemon oil or tea tree oil for an anti-stink spray.

Air Cleanser: Try putting a few drops into your vacuum and clothes dryer filters to freshen them up and sanitize them a little. Also, it’s great for killing mold in your home, and you can mix eucalyptus with other oils like clove and tea tree oil to cleanse the air and maintain a mold-free home.

Spot Remover: Like lemon essential oil, eucalyptus oil is highly effective at removing spots on your carpet, clothes and basically every fabric you have in the house. It even works to get gum off your shoes! Make sure to “test” it on an inconspicuous place first just to make sure the oil doesn’t react strangely with the material you treat. You just don’t know what’s in the synthetic materials nowadays!

Eucalyptus Side Effects: Eucalyptus essential oil in its original state is extremely potent and can be actually poisonous when undiluted, especially for young children. It is important that you consume the herbal remedy in small quantities as it can be toxic when overused. The herbal remedy has also been reported to cause airborne contact dermatitis in individuals with certain levels of allergic sensitivities. Eucalyptus essential oil is also known to interfere with certain homeopathic remedies, hence; it will be wise for you to consult a licensed herbalist before deciding to use it.

By Arnaud Gaillard (arnaud () amarys.com) – Self. Photo de l’auteur., CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2411

Recipes with Eucalyptus

Eucalyptus Tea Recipe for Asthma and Bronchitis

Ingredients:

  • 1.5 ounces of dried eucalyptus leaves
  • 1 ounce of dried coltsfoot leaves
  • 1 ounce of dried thyme leaves
  • 1 cup of water

Procedure:

  • Mix all herbs together, and pour 1 teaspoon of the mixture into a cup of boiling water.
  • Cover and steep for 10 minutes, then strain. Serve and enjoy.

Eucalyptus Tea Recipe for Acne

Ingredients:

  • 1 ounce of dried eucalyptus leaves
  • 1 ounce of dried dandelion roots and leaves
  • 0.75 ounces of dried licorice root
  • 1 cup of water
  • 0.75 ounces of fennel seeds

Procedure

  • Mix all herbs together and pour 1 teaspoon of the mixture into a cup of boiling water.
  • Cover and steep for 10 minutes, then strain. Serve and enjoy.
  • Alternatively, you can use the tea as a facial wash. Simply let the tea cool to a comfortable temperature first before applying to your skin.

Eucalyptus Tea Recipe for Head Colds

Ingredients:

  • 0.5 ounces of dried eucalyptus leaves
  • 0.5 ounces of dried chamomile flowers
  • 1 ounce of dried peppermint leaves
  • 1 cup of water
  • Raw, organic honey to taste

Procedure:

  • Mix all herbs together, and pour 1 teaspoon of the mixture into a cup of boiling water.
  • Add honey to taste. Serve and enjoy.

Making Infused Eucalyptus Oil: The great thing about eucalyptus oil is that you can make it in your own home, especially if you have leftovers from making tea. Below are a few things you need to make infused eucalyptus oil:

Ingredients:

  • Kitchen weighing scale
  • 2 ounces of eucalyptus leaves
  • Olive oil or a different carrier oil
  • Crock pot
  • Small-gauge mesh strainer
  • Airtight jar made of dark glass

Procedure:

  • Gently crush the eucalyptus leaves with your fist to release the oil. You may use more or less depending on the size of your crock pot.
  • Place the eucalyptus leaves in the crock pot.
  • Add 1 cup of olive oil for every 1/4 ounce of leaves in the crock pot.
  • Place the lid on the crock pot and turn it on at low heat. Let the mixture steep for 6 hours.
  • Strain the eucalyptus oil through the mesh strainer and into the jar.
  • Seal the jar and date it.
  • Store the eucalyptus oil in a cool, dry spot, where it will remain viable for 6 months. If needed longer, store the oil in the vegetable crisper drawer in your refrigerator, where it will last for about a year.

References:

  1. https://www.edensgarden.com/blogs/news/this-or-that-whats-the-difference-between-our-eucalyptus-essential-oils
  2. http://www.experience-essential-oils.com/uses-of-eucalyptus.html
  3. https://www.therighttea.com/eucalyptus-tea.html
  4. http://www.experience-essential-oils.com/uses-of-eucalyptus.html
  5. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eucalyptus_globulus
  6. https://www.herbs-for-health.com/eucalyptus-benefits/
  7. https://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-700-EUCALYPTUS.aspx
  8. https://articles.mercola.com/herbs-spices/eucalyptus.aspx
  9. https://woman.thenest.com/eucalyptus-tea-good-for-3699.html
  10. https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/herbs-and-spices/eucalyptus.html
  11. https://www.livestrong.com/article/505179-benefits-of-eucalyptus-tea/
  12. https://draxe.com/eucalyptus-oil-uses-benefits/